I want a muzzleloader but

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by ARlover, Sep 7, 2013.

  1. ARlover

    ARlover New Member

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    I don't know a thing about them and never shoot one. All I know is its one more way to hunt
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Well, you sort of have 3 roads to pick from.

    Road 1 is the modern, in line muzzle loader. Probably uses a 209 shotshell primer, using saboted jacketed pistol bullets and Pyrodex pellets. Accurate, reliable. And a Big Mac is good food. :( Synthetic stock, stainless steel

    Second path is a modern version of a traditional caplock, like a Hawken. May have coil springs rather than leaf springs, but looks a lot like the rifle that an explorer would have bought in St. Louis on his way West. Sidehammer, #11 percussion cap, probably shoots a maxi ball and Triple 7 powder, many have double set triggers. Walnut, blued steel, pretty guns, as accurate as you are.

    3rd way is the Uber Traditional. Daniel Boone would feel right at home with your Pennsylvania long rifle. Flintlock. LONG barrel. Walnut, brass furniture, browned steel. Shoots a patched round ball with Goex ffG black powder. You probably slaughtered the steer and rendered the tallow to lube your bullets.

    And you know what? All 3 are fun. Pays your money, takes your pick.
     

  3. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Here are two of mine

    This one is a .45 cal Pennsylvania style rifle- caplock, long barrel, does best with patched ball.
    rifles 022.jpg

    This one is a .50 cal Thompson Center, similar to a Hawken. Set triggers, shoots maxi balls very well. Shorter barrel.
    rifles 023.jpg
     
  4. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    Many years ago I had a .58 black powder rifle. It was an 1863 Zouave and a hoot to shoot. At a hundred yards, I could actually see the bullet going down range. All that being said, they are still firearms and just as dangerous as anything you might be shooting right now. I have gotten back into bp shooting, as I have just purchased an 1858 Reminington Army revolver in .44. Can't wait to get this bad boy to the range. good luck
     
  5. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Main thing to keep in mind before buying black powder guns is......
    You Absolutely must be meticulous about cleaning. If you're not willing to take the time to properly clean the gun after every time you shoot it, don't bother buying one.

    Next thing, don't buy an off caliber gun. Also sure you can get a ball mould or bare minimum get your hands on round ball for it. If you're not willing to mould you're own ball, you're not a black powder shooter.

    Third thing to remember is.....
    Powder, patch, ball. Why is this third?
    Because I enjoy laughing at people that dry ball.
     
  6. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You spelled butt wrong. :p
    I know, I know. I'm drunk.
     
  7. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    The modern in lines are much closer to modern rifles. I wouldn't want to discourage anyone from going the traditional route, and it is fun, but if you just want more time hunting get an in line modern muzzle loader. Go with any of the reputable brands and I would suggest a .50 cal. You can then get .45 cal saboted hollow points to shoot in it and they will get the job done! For powder you can get Pyrodex pellets and just drop 2 or 3 down the barrel. The number of pellets will be determined by your muzzle loader. I have an older Knight that uses 2 but I think most of the new ones use three? After you drop in the pellets just push the bullet in and put the primer on.

    The new ones with scopes can shoot good groups at 100 yards + but keep in mind this is a primitive weapon so don't get hung up trying to shoot 1" groups. Get close and make the shot count.

    And like mountainman 13 said you have to clean it thoroughly each and every time you shoot it. I take mine apart and scrub it in the bath tub submerged in hot water. That's how thorough you need to be.

    They are more trouble but they will put meat in the freezer. I like to hunt normally crowded spots with muzzle loader because I can get in before the crowds and then fall back on my good spots during rifle season. :)

    Here is a decent doe I got last Oct. with my old Knight:
    Doe.jpg
     
  8. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    And as was indicated- there are 3 kinds of muzzle loading shooters-
    1. Those that HAVE failed to load powder before ball
    2. Those that WILL fail to load powder first
    3. Those that lie about it
     
  9. robertusa123

    robertusa123 New Member

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    Stay away from flint locks if you planing on hunting with it. Flint Isn't very reliable and you will also need real black power to at the least prim the pan with. Modern black power aka safer power is harder to set off. Good it you don't want the gun to go off shoal your loading it. Bad when you try to shoot it.
    So let's cap. Flint lock. Finicky fireing and hard to find power. Percusion cap reliability and easy to find loading supply
    however flint locks are still fun to shoot
     
  10. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    That is the truth. It's not that I've never dry balled, just that I've never been caught. Lmfao
     
  11. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I haven't forgot the powder yet, but I did leave the 2nd safety on when that doe walked out! Knights have a second safety on the bolt that screws down and prevents the bolt from striking the primer. I put the front bead on her at 15 yards, pulled the trigger, and "snap". I thought it was the primer so I pulled the bolt back and another "snap". I finally realized what was happening and took the safety off. By this time that doe had done figured something was up and it wasn't good. Keep in mind I was on the ground and in the open. Fortunately for me she stopped to take one last look back to see what all that commotion was. Everything I did on that hunt was absolutely flawless and then I almost blew it right at the last second! That's muzzle loader hunting. :)
     
  12. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Funny post. The flint lock is unreliable. This system was in use 400 years. The percussion cap was short lived. There are tons of original flinters around to this day. Many back country hunters would not change out the time proven ignition. A piece of chert can be found any where a cap was vulnerable to water and hard to find. The Flint lock shooters of today are at the top of the food chain today at wining matches. The design of a modern custom flinter is a work of art. Cleaning a black powder firearms are and was easy and remains easy to this day. Visit a serious black powder shoot and get some good information. ;)
     
  13. robertusa123

    robertusa123 New Member

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    The percussion cap dissent stick around long because a much better loading system came the modern mataliac cartridge. Which when you think about it still has a percussion cap in it. And when you think about it. The bolt action rifle is over 100 years old. Time fly's when your having fun
     
  14. ARlover

    ARlover New Member

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    Thank you so much you guys are awesome can you guys refer me to an "in line modern" 50cal brand or a few with ish prices
     
  15. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I took his post to draw more attention to the difficulty of using modern black powder substitutes in a flintlock. I've had a flintlock and percussion cap rifle each fail while hunting in misty conditions. Part of the additional challenge of traditional hunting. I do find a bit more reliable fast lock time with a percussion cap, and less tendency to shut my eye or turn away from the flash pan. I could just be a wimp though.

    I like a good Hawken in .50 cal.

    I recommend sticking with a .50 if choosing a side lock gun and a plan to shoot ball and Minnie Balls. If going with a modern inline gun then go with the most common callibers.
     
  16. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    Thompson is probably the best one out right now, but the CVA is good and probably has the best price? I would look at those two. :)

    And some time in the future you may want to check out a Hawkins with a side lock. They feel truly primitive and there is something special about hunting with one. They are also more than capable of getting the job done. They just aren't quite as easy to use as a modern in line.
     
  17. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    c3shooter said bout everthing ya needs ta no bout front stuffers................
     
  18. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't know if this the place for it but I have a discontinued 700 Rem muzzle loader that has never been fired. I bought it for the same reason you are buying one but never used it. I am considering selling it. If you are interested PM me.
    Thanks.:)