I need ideas for a reloading work area, what ya got?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Mack Bolan, Aug 9, 2010.

  1. Mack Bolan

    Mack Bolan New Member

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    i'm looking to start reloading however i have one question in regards to the designated work area.

    right now, the only area i have conducive to reloading to set up my equipment is a"temporary" one, meaning i couldn't leave everything out and set up- i would have to set up and breakdown everytime (like a reloading roadie) and being a total green horn, i'm wondering if thats even worth it.

    i mean in terms of set up and breakdown time vs actual reloading time- most likely i'll never have more than 4-6 hours to commit- if 3 of that is spent setting up and cleaning up, and in the other 3hrs i can only do 50-100 rounds....it may be worth just waiting til i have a better area set aside to reload in.

    i just dont know whats a typical production rate for the average noob/beginning reloader...?

    i would be starting in .40 S&W and 10mm with a RCBS supreme rock chucker kit- i dont want to buy any bullets, powder or primers until i have a more solid plan as to where and when i'm going to do this. Thanks.

    mack.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 3, 2010
  2. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Google "reloading benches" and it will take you to several other forums that I saw yesterday. Some really neat ideas and setups for reloading in cramped quarters. Sorry I don't have time to find some for you, but this is a start. :)
     

  3. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    At first I would go slow and triple check everything I do. That is just me. Don't look for speed in the beginning that is a sure way to end up with a KABOOM in your face.

    There are plenty of reloading bench set ups out there. If you are going to build a bench make it HEAVY duty. I am talking 6x6 Legs 2 sheets of 1 1/2 plywood with 2x6 bracing and if you can screw that sucker to the wall and bolt it to the floor. My current bench is built out of 2x4 and it even being screwed to the wall top and bottom with 3 1/2" deckmate screws it still wobbles. If you can build a bench then I would put in some metal track so that you can have plates and just move and remove items at will. I have also seen where they take 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood and make a cut out where the middle layer is bigger than the top and bottom (Like an Oreo cookie with the filling on the outside and the cookie in the middle). If you make the removable section large enough it will spread the force of reloading over a greater area. Then you can make a plug that is smooth and one for your press and one for a vice or anything else you need.

    It all depends on the space you have and the space you want.

    Here is the plans to a corner unit that folds up and locks so little fingers and eyes can't get into it. Corner Reloading Bench Plans

    Here is a sweet design from the NRA. http://www.americanrifleman.org/Webcontent/pdf/2009-7/200971592146-loadingbench.pdf

    Here is one with the removable press section. Reloading Bench Project

    I hate posting links to other forums. But here is a 51+ page thread with so many pictures it will take you a week to get through them all. If you don't have a log in sign up for one just for this thread. I am telling you so totally worth it.

    Show us a picture of your reloading bench - Page 2 - THR
     
  4. VitSports6

    VitSports6 New Member

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    Here is my meager reloading station.

    [​IMG]

    I have since moved this "Bullet-n-board" for a shelf, I moved this to the back of the door.

    [​IMG]

    Mine is in a storage room, I keep all the consumables in my safe, I managed to reload 40 7.62x54R bullets in less than an hour, They were already clean, But I did prime, powder and bullet them, I usually measure the loads every ten rounds, Just to be sure I'm getting the right amount.
    I don't see why you couldn't make a couple hundred rounds in a few hours, The smaller rounds do seem to go a little quicker.
    I haven't done any reloading for a few months, I've been busy out and about enjoying the weather.
    Good luck
     
  5. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I have an area that I can reload in but I have to set up and take down when I want to do anything. It can be a pain but I just make sure I have several hours before I get started so I can make it worth while.
    Go slow, ask questions and double check everything you do.
     
  6. opaww

    opaww New Member

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    I started with no bench I just took my ex-wifes step stool which had a wood top on it and drilled holes for the press and used that. I just never figured out why she was mad at me and she would not tell me.
     
  7. Troy Michalik

    Troy Michalik Is it Friday yet? Supporter

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    Mack, if a temporary set up is all you have to work with, then work with what you have. There is no rule that says you have to reload start to finish in one session. Break up the process into easy stopping points. For instance, clean and inspect all your brass one day, the next day de-cap and size, then prime. The final step would be a little longer with charging and seating, but breaking the process up into smaller steps might be more manageable with your space and time restraints.

    Like has been said before, check and recheck and then check it again. Take good notes to mark the progress of your batches if you break it up into steps, and then go over what you’ve done before starting the next session.

    Obviously there is no substitute for having a full time reloading area, but doing without isn’t impossible.

    Good luck and let us know how it goes.
     
  8. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Hey Vits... Where did you get the poster from ?? I love it!!
     
  9. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Hmm is that why she's your "ex" wife now?:rolleyes:
     
  10. VitSports6

    VitSports6 New Member

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    I got it from my dad along with all the reloading equipment, I remember the poster in my dads reloading area from when I was a kid back in the 70's.
    Its a Hornaday chart, I would imagine there are newer posters, But I have never looked.
     
  11. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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  12. Mack Bolan

    Mack Bolan New Member

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    thank you for the advice everyone, i will proceed accordingly in phases most likely how troy described until i can set up a permanent area for this new hobby.

    as usual all the posts and the pics have been informative and helpful-thumbs up!
     
  13. TXnorton

    TXnorton New Member

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    One of the many benefits of having the kids grow up and leave home is that you can take their old bedrooms and turn them into a loading and ammo storage room. I really need to paint the walls, but I hate to paint!

    Left to right are my 30+ year old RCBS Single Stage, my newer Dillion RL-550 set up for 9mm and .45 ACP, my 1980's old Dillion RL-450 B set up for .223.

    The white looking bullets on the far left are the hand-rolled paper cartridges for the .54 cal 1863 Sharps replica.
     

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  14. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    What's wrong with the "Toy Story" motif?

    Nice setup there!
     
  15. Silvertip 44

    Silvertip 44 New Member

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    Here's mine. I sort of took over the back of the pantry. since it's just me and my little dog here, I didn't have to go through a permission process. It sure is nice in the winter and when its hot to be able to load in comfort.
    The hard non porous top really makes it easy to collect spilled powder granules.
     

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  16. noylj

    noylj Member

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    Reloading space

    Besides the garage, I have a closet as a reloading room.
    If you don't have the room and need to take it down, you can use a Black&Decker "Workmate® 425 Portable Project Center and Vice" or a Frankford Arsenal "Portable Reloading Stand" for $64.99.
    Harbor Freight has a WorkMate knock-off ("Folding Clamping Workbench with Movable Pegs" for $19.99) and a small work table that you could move around ("Adjustable Height Heavy Duty Workstation" for $27.99).

    Or, a Lee Classic Reloader for each caliber and a good leather or plastic mallet.
     
  17. opaww

    opaww New Member

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    No I traded her for a cheep bottle of whisky and a pack of smokes, and I got a deal out of that trade.

    My re-loading bench is set up in my bed room sense the ex-wife is not here I can do what I want to.
     

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  18. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Here is mine, a work in progress that I can only work on a little bit at a time. I need more shelves, maybe this weekend. Then, of course, the window treatments......
     

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  19. budman46

    budman46 New Member

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    Mack Bolan,

    fwiw, when i first got married, i bolted my press to a 2x6...stored behind the couch until used...which i c-clamped to a coffee table covered with a towel. set up was minutes, take down was equally quick.

    my presses are now c-clamped to a sturdy 3x6 bench.

    budman

    ignorance is its oswn reward
     
  20. pmeisel

    pmeisel New Member

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    I have seen people do good work on a temporary basis with a black and decker workmate, and a press bolted to a board they could clamp into it.