I need a flintlock rifle expert

Discussion in 'Blackpowder & Musket' started by mattknoll, Mar 15, 2010.

  1. mattknoll

    mattknoll New Member

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    cant figure out much info on this particular gun I have acquired. if you think you are a master let me know and I will email you pics. there are no markings on this rifle and all I know is that it is a flintlock or percussion. its a barrell loader, probably a shotgun. and its action is completely unique to anything I can find info on. Maybe this can challenge even an expert, or maybe I need to feel dumb by having you figure this out quickly. anyway email me and I will send you pics. thanks matt
    mtk8_42@yahoo.com
     
  2. deth502

    deth502 New Member

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    why not just post pics here?
     

  3. mattknoll

    mattknoll New Member

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    hope these pics open up some answers

    I was mobile at the time I decided to start this thread and it wouldn't allow me to load them. lets see if you can view these attachments. please let me know if you could at least see the attachments. I'd appreciate any help you can give me. It weighs 3.75lbs, 49 inches long. so its really lite, and pretty small for a rifle. thanks again!
     

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  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Typically these were grouped as "boys" or "ladies" rifles. The unusual stock may have it more in the "ladies" class. Typically small caliber (light recoil). No markings at all on the lock? Hard to tell from pics, may be a damacus type steel on the barrel. Other than sitting with an inch thick copy of Flayderman's Guide to Antique Firearms, and flipping thru looking at pics, this one will require the services of a true expert in antique arms. There are a few that will do an on-line appraisal, given MANY detailed photos.

    And by the way- that is not a flintlock- it is a caplock.
     
  5. mattknoll

    mattknoll New Member

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    Thank you. There is some morkings on the top of the Barrell and there is a plate where there appeared to be writing back in the day, but with magnifying glasses and lots of light its all so warn that its impossible to read any of it. The barrel is almost an entire inch in diameter at the end, so I was figuring the light weight couldnt bare a large caliber so maybe a shotgun. whats the difference in caplock vs. flintlock? Do you know where I could find an online appraiser? perferably one that works for cheap. I am going to attempt to sell this, but would like to know more before I jump into that river. thanks again.
     
  6. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    It's a caplock and the rear sight groove marks it as a shotgun but beyond that I cant help you.
     
  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Matt- if you go to auctionarms.com, on their home page, there is a link to a "for fee" firearms appraisal company. Have NO diea what their fees are- you can ask.

    A flintlock flintlck.gif holds a bit of flint rock in the cock. When trigger is pulled, spring forces the flint down the frizzen, scraping sparks into the priming pan.

    A later and more reliable arm was the caplock. A small metal cup (the cap)holding priming compound was placed on the gun's nipple. The hammer strikes the cap, exploding it, send a jet of flame through the hollow center of the nipple, and into the powder charge.

    If the opening in the end of the barrel is nearly an inch in diameter, this would be more likely to be a shotgun, but the extreme light weight would make a shotgun VERY punishing.

    If you have not done so, please check and see if your arm is still loaded. Take the ramrod (or any gun cleaning rod long enough to reach from the muzzle ALL the way down the barrel to the nipple) lay it against the outside of the barrel, one end at the nipple, other end extending past the muzzle. mark the end at the muzzle (wrap of tape) and and then insert the rod into the barrel. It should be to within a half inch of your tape. If the rod presses against something an inch or two- or more- before it goes all the way down- you may still have powder and shot in there. It happens.

    If so, do not panic, but do not try to shoot it out- a gunsmith can safely pull the charge using a rod and a tool called a worm.
     
  8. Fisherking

    Fisherking New Member

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    It is a cap lock now but I think it has been converted from a flint lock. There apers to be a pan to hold the powder for a flint. and the spring on the out side looks like it could have been a frizzen spring and some one has added a larger spring to work the hammer.
    My 2 cents F.K.
     
  9. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    +1, I agree that it looks like it was a flint lock in it's early life.
     
  10. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    The lock is too small to house the workings internally. The nipple is screwed directly into the breech plug instead of using a drum setup like conversions did and the flash guard is part of the breech plug.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2010
  11. Tgeorge

    Tgeorge New Member

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    Weird lock design with the mechanism outside

    Reminds me of this kind of lock - Micqulet.

    The Miquelet Lock --Spanish Weaponry

    I read somewhere that these locks were used in Mediterranean countries as the climate there is rather dry and doesn't rust the guts out as easily as it would in England, France or America.