I have a problem: serious

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by bobbyb13, Feb 18, 2009.

  1. bobbyb13

    bobbyb13 New Member

    639
    0
    0
    A close friend of 30+ years that I hunted, fished, shot with, and worked on our old Hot Rods, took his life last year, after a terminal diagnosis with cancer.
    He shot himself with a S&W model 29. I saw this firearm (with case number on the bottom of the grip) at a police range several months later. I know the gun well. A Officer was firing the gun. Now, when my Friends Son, and Daughter requested the return of the firearm. The Dept. can't find it. I told them the Officer I saw with the weapon. He denies it violently. There are 3 other people who saw him with the firearm, who do NOT want to get involved. This is headed for a freaking mess. Should I have kept my mouth shut. I don't think so. I guess I'm to old, I just see things in B&W. I just brought it up here more or less to vent my feelings. Now, 99.9% of law enforcement are straight up people. But I just don't want or need a mess of them covering their own, with my A$$ in the middle. Opinions?
     
  2. JiroZero713

    JiroZero713 Active Member

    1,071
    0
    36
    Hell yes you should bring that up. That's some farking BS
     

  3. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

    9,624
    1
    0
    Do they really want it back? I'm personally not sure that I'd want the stigma attached to the gun in my safe.

    Maybe one of our LEO members could tell you who's next in the chain to be contacted.
     
  4. AsmelEduardo

    AsmelEduardo New Member

    2,443
    0
    0
    You made the correct. Is not the gun itself, is the officer doing the wrong thing... I would push it hard to emend the thing and find the responsible (and make him pay for it) :mad:
    That's a crime, there's not a misunderstood or a mistake; He took inappropriately the gun, period.:mad:
     
  5. iloveguns

    iloveguns New Member

    729
    0
    0

    I agree with Asmel!!!!:)
     
  6. user4

    user4 New Member

    3,414
    1
    0
    Way too generous a number considering Chicago, NY, Los Angeles, and Miami...

    Fight it, but fight it correctly. Always have people and witnesses for everything. Start at the top. Don't work your way up to the top. Be a straight shooter. "This is my gun. This is the serial number. I tried to get my gun back, but was told it was lost.This officer has my gun. Can I please have my gun back?"

    There's no need for accusations, just present the facts.
     
  7. hunter Joe

    hunter Joe New Member

    2,361
    1
    0
    I think that you are kind of between a rock and a hard place. Although, I am not in law enforcement, I do have a BA in criminal justice. You will probably come up against a "big blue wall". Often, but not always, there is an "us against them" mentality amongst law enforcement officers. You can't blame law enforcement officers for watching each others back. You may want to leave that sleeping dog lay. It your call though.
     
  8. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

    9,624
    1
    0
    Is this a small town department?
     
  9. bobbyb13

    bobbyb13 New Member

    639
    0
    0
    yes

    Small town with 6 officers. Well 7 counting the Chief.
     
  10. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

    19,847
    3
    0
    I really don't know what you should do. Of course, the right thing is to drive on and pursue this. But in a small town with six or seven cops, life could get very interesting in a bad way. Watch your six.
     
  11. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    If the family wants the gun back, they absolutely have the right to have it back. THEY should pursue the issue with the PD and you are a witness in this matter. If the officer misappropriated the firearm, he is wrong and should give it back. He or they can explain it away any way they want, but the property should be returned. They cannot find it? They do not know what happens to the guns in their custody? WTF is that about? We have very strict controls about access to weapons storage areas. Few can get in there much less get in there alone. I have access as I am an armorer and ballistician. I regularly examine firearms and even check them out to run tests on them. I guarantee my signature is on the proper paperwork.

    What is right is right and what is wrong is wrong.
     
  12. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

    9,624
    1
    0
    Yeah, kinda what I was thinking.

    Should the family wish to pursue this, I think an attorney is in order. If you're absolutely sure about this, kinda makes me wonder what else is missing from the evidence room.
     
  13. orangello

    orangello New Member

    19,156
    0
    0
    My uncle had to get pretty ugly with the local sheriff's dept to get his son's guns & other items from his gun safe returned after said son was almost killed by some kind of robbery at home situation. The uncle got stalled & stalled & stalled by the sheriff's dept, until he called on a lawyer to make a more "official" request. The guns were returned with what was probably everything else from the safe (the cousin lost some memory). I believe it was the idea of ending up in court over the guns & the potential for public embarassment that motivated the sheriff's office, in this case. Know any decent lawyers?

    I should point out this is a small town with a sheriff's department that doesn't have the cleanest record. If it matters, they didn't get much results from their "investigation" either (which was concluded before the request for the return of the safe contents). It was sad and quite a pathetic reflection on an already tarnished department.

    Do not quit until you straighten this out; the officer needs to be held accountable for his theft or to make a reasonable explanation for having the weapon. I don't suppose it could have been purchased at some kind of auction of seized items?

    edit* If the officer stole the gun from the evidence room, a little more than an apology is in order, theft charges IMO.
     
  14. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    The threat of going to the media is a powerful motivator.

    While it is easy to "jump to the conclusion" the gun was stolen, shoddy paperwork and parting out of guns prior to destruction also happens. When a gun is destroyed, only the serial numbered frame needs to go. Everything else is just parts. If the case number was on the grips and the grips were then put on another gun it would appear to be the same gun.

    I know, I am probably stretching a bit but weird things happen. More likely someone decided they "liked" it and lifted it. If the PD is serious about their own reputation, they should have it entered as stolen into NCIC. That will get some panties ruffled.

    Contacting an attorney is not a bad idea at all. It is funny how a demand letter on a lawyer's stationary gets some attention.

    It is likely that someone "assumed" that no one would want a suicide gun back and just helped themselves. It is fairly rare that suicide guns are even requested to be returned. Many people do not want the stigmatized gun anywhere near them, nor do they want the bad last reminder of a lost loved one.

    And, we all know what happens when you "assume", don't we?
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2009
  15. dnthmn2004

    dnthmn2004 New Member

    3,287
    0
    0
    Tricky situation. I'd take robocop's advice. Hes pretty much the reigning law enforcement opinion here.
     
  16. hillbilly68

    hillbilly68 New Member

    994
    0
    0
    Kinda makes you feel helpless seeing someone that is in a position of authority be corrupt. A liar. A thief. Not trustworthy.
    Yeah let the fam go after it and be a witness to it. To not say anything (you know the guy did wrong) is just as bad as committing the act in some ways.
     
  17. dragunovsks

    dragunovsks New Member

    2,310
    0
    0
    I would definately rattle some cages on this one. I would start with the sheriff or police chief, if that didn't work I'd go to his superior and rattle his cage. If you don't get anywhere then I'd go to the local news channel, maybe that'll get em' shook up a little bit. I know that most LEO's are honest hardworking individuals but something crooked is going on and at the expense of you and your family. I'm not sure if I would want that firearm back due to the suicide but that's not my decision.

    Rattle some cages and I hope you get somewhere with this problem.
     
  18. bobbyb13

    bobbyb13 New Member

    639
    0
    0
    Update, thankfully

    My Friend's Model 29, apparently wasn't the only thing missing. The COP appoligized to my old friend's childern. Returned the firearm, There is a audit of the office being done. Good,
     
  19. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    Good to hear. I hope the offending party at least learns his lesson.
     
  20. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

    21,833
    2
    0
    + 1 Asmel!

    [​IMG]

    THAT'S BULL$HIT!!
    .....BOOK 'EM DANO!