I have a 1911 question.

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by RustyShackleford101, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. RustyShackleford101

    RustyShackleford101 New Member

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    Okay, I usually carry a Glock, Occasionally I will use a 1911 or a selective Sa and DA auto ( m9 etc). With my m9, I carry with the hammer down and safety off. With the 1911 I carry with the hammer up and safety on. The gun doesn't have a hair trigger or anything. O was just wondering if it is safe to carry with the hammer up and safety off.
     
  2. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    In My Highly Opinionated mind, you should use all safeties available.
    The 1911 thumb safety blocks movement of the sear. Carrying it cocked and unlocked would allow movement of the sear and release of the hammer should it hit something.

    Carry it cocked and locked.
     

  3. bearrwe

    bearrwe New Member

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    Let me just say NO!!!!!! :eek:
     
  4. Donn

    Donn Active Member

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    This past weekend, an off-duty Detroit Police officer had a negligent discharge that killed a woman. His piece was holstered and allegedly went off when he hugged this woman. Point is, like others have said, utilize every safety available. Accidents happen.
     
  5. Wiebelhaus

    Wiebelhaus New Member

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    I know a guy who did this, bumped into a wall and shot himself in the ass, he deserved it.
     
  6. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Just one reasonable answer -----NO
    Cocked & Locked or no round in chamber---
     
  7. W. C. Quantrill

    W. C. Quantrill New Member

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  8. gearhead396

    gearhead396 New Member

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    I rarely carry with one in the chamber but if I do the weapon has a hammer and I will usually lay the hammer back against the stop so you have to pull the hammer back to fire like I said that is rare though I usually Carry with nothing in the chamber and never do I carry my glock with one in the chamber
     
  9. bearrwe

    bearrwe New Member

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    I know this has been argued forever, but the only safe way to carry a 1911 with a round in the chamber is Cocked and Locked! Hammer down leaves the safeties off allows for inertia to cause a discharge.
     
  10. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    I've been carrying various 1911s for 40 years. They are designed to be carried safely in condition one (cocked and locked). It is also the only proper way to carry it. I also use a paddle holster that has a thumb strap, that when snapped, lies between the hammer and slide. Anyone familiar enough with the 1911 to carry it properly, will never have an AD. In my opinion, the 1911 is probably the safest semi auto handgun ever designed.

    Jim...........
     
  11. Sourdough54

    Sourdough54 New Member

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    It depends on the conditions your in at the time. If you are expecting immediate trouble carry cocked and locked. If you carry out in the field cocked and locked or hammer down on a loaded chamber. Yes the 1911 has an inertia foreign pin but it is held back by a spring to keep it from going forward from its own inertia. It does take a lot of force to move that firing pin hard enough to fire a round when the hammers already down. You can always put in a titanium firing pin and a heavier firing pin spring and hammer spring.

    I did this on one of my 1911's and have never had a failure to fire due to a light hit.
     
  12. AIKIJUTSU

    AIKIJUTSU New Member

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    Was the negligent "discharge" done with his handgun, or was it done with his "member"? Poor lady!
     
  13. dragunovsks

    dragunovsks New Member

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    I also carry in condition one, never had an AD either. When i started carrying my dad and i went round and round about this. In my opinion its the only way to carry. What if someone grabs you and youve only one hand to draw your weapon? This happened to a buddy of mine and his dad. They were restoring a 1970 Chevelle and had most everything except some minor things done. They thought a sunday afternoon drive would be fun. While stopped at a light a bg reached through the window and grabbed SR (both are named Randall). With his right hand he drew his 1911 and placed it at the bg's chin and told him he had 3 seconds to release or he'd splatter his brain matter all over the headliner. Needlessness to say it didnt take him long to rethink his options.
     
  14. Wiebelhaus

    Wiebelhaus New Member

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    Correct me if I'm wrong but if you carry in condition two, this basically means the weapon is a double action pull?
     
  15. AIKIJUTSU

    AIKIJUTSU New Member

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    No, with a 1911 there is no such thing as a double action pull. In condition 2 you have to thumb-cock it before you fire.
     
  16. Wiebelhaus

    Wiebelhaus New Member

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    Oh ok, I did not realize that, I don't have much 1911 experience other than a few boxes on a range trip but that happens when you work the action to chamber a round?
     
  17. bearrwe

    bearrwe New Member

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    1911 is a SA it is meant to be carried in Condition One when loaded ( cocked and locked) with the hammer down it must be cocked manually.
     
  18. AIKIJUTSU

    AIKIJUTSU New Member

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    If you put in a loaded magzine when there is no round in the chamber, you rack the slide to load the chamber. This leaves the hammer cocked. If you then apply the manual safety, the gun will remain cocked with a round in the chamber. This is condition 1, the best way to carry a 1911. If you rack the slide to load a round, then carefully lower the hammer by holding the hammer with one hand while pulling the trigger with the other, then don't apply the safety, that's condition 2 - hammer down on a loaded chamber, safety off. So, since the 1911 won't fire double action, you have to cock the hammer with your thumb before you can fire. This is dangerous in two ways- when you pull the trigger and lower the hammer with your thumb and forefinger, you risk having the hammer slip out of your hand. The second risk is when thumb-cocking it before firing. If you do that be SURE you don't touch the trigger while cocking the hammer.
     
  19. Wiebelhaus

    Wiebelhaus New Member

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    So then, the 1911 was designed with a firing pin that's struck by a hammer, is that a testament to the technology at the time or to a mechanical system that just works well? I would assume mechanically it would have made sense to encase the hammer in a steal shroud. So then what reason is the hammer exposed? is it theoretical? or is it mechanical reason or just a sign of the times?