i dont speak motorcycle

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by gunguy1997, May 21, 2012.

  1. gunguy1997

    gunguy1997 New Member

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    http://garwoodcycles.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=listing&rid=1426&pageid=32&id=578665


    thats the link to a zx6r. since im going to be driving soon i thought i might as well start looking and saving and i've discussed it with my mom and dad they say a 600 would be best to learn on.(my dad has dealt with motorcycles his whole life) and they agree that if i show responsibility and save my money i can get a 600. now im torn between these 2(other link below) any advice? my dads asleep so cant get no advice from him.


    http://garwoodcycles.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=listing&rid=1506&pageid=32&id=578665
     
  2. 94browninghunt

    94browninghunt New Member

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    since jujst for learning you should go for the lesser priced one... learn it, upgrade a lil and then buy a different one in afew years!
     

  3. kytowboater

    kytowboater Active Member

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    Cheaper is better, it's not if but when you lay it down.
     
  4. fireguy

    fireguy New Member

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    Both of those bikes are old enough to probably have had some serious running done with them. The first one has a lot of add ons, mostly for performance. Are you already a rider? If not, you might want to get a tamer bike for the first one. How far are you needing to travel? If it is local there are some 250 street bikes that are a lot of fun to ride and won't get you in as much horsepower trouble as a 600. Seems like the prices are a little high on both of them too, maybe bikes go for more back east than they do here.
    Do some more research and enjoy. Riding is almost as good as shooting.
     
  5. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    I know one thing for sure about motorcycles.
    You will dump it.
    Always go cheap for your first bike. Chances are its gonna take a beating. I've seen guys go out and spend $7k on their first bike and put the kick stand down on a rock and have the bike fall over within a week. Expensive bike = expensive mistake.
     
  6. gunguy1997

    gunguy1997 New Member

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    well i have riden before i would say im experienced ive driven dirt bikes and a old 99 zx6r one time for about a city block other than that not much i have had quite a lot of experience with atv's though. if that counts for anything.
     
  7. BenLuby

    BenLuby New Member

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    Your first street bike and you've done dirt?

    http://www.suzukicycles.com/Product Lines/Cycles/Products/Boulevard S40/2012/S40.aspx

    That's about $5,500 brand new, so you're buying a bike under warranty, and it's a lot more similar to what you're used to.
    For your first bike, a crotch rocket isn't exactly what I'd recommend. Don't take this personally, but young people and crotch rockets tends to cause a severe case of thinking they can push it to it's limits.
     
  8. gunguy1997

    gunguy1997 New Member

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    well i understand that and i will by no means "push it to the limit" mainly because i would be riding straight to work and back along with my dad which is the main reason i want a "crotch rocket" anyway because he is going tomorrow to buy a zx 10r and when im of age we are going to make it a tradition to go ride once a year. and ive always liked the way they look.
     
  9. fupuk

    fupuk New Member

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    Ive been around bikes my whole life, i dont ride rockets i ride Harleys. But from people i know that do ride rockets the Gsxr is gonna be less of a problem for you. And they are cheaper to fix than a Kawasaki. And its the cheaper of the two. There will always be a market for older crotch rockets and if they are taken care of they will hold their value pretty good.
     
  10. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    If you have not ridden before and not attended a motorcycle training course, then attend one.

    Most first time riders want the "race" styled bike (looks cool, impractical as heck), get to the course and cannot handle the 250cc rebel without getting in trouble.

    Some 600cc bikes (like a Ninja) are designed for the experienced rider and are not fun to ride for more that three hours straight.

    Get some miles under your belt with a bike that you can afford to dump or have an accident with (and it is not a question of "if", but "when" it happens).
     
  11. wjnfirearms

    wjnfirearms New Member

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    Sorry, friend. I can not call you experienced. Riding dirt and pavement are two very different things. You may understand how a bike operates, but that's about all.

    Two points I agree with. First, don't go for the fastest or most expensive bike for your first streeter. I'd also consider keeping the cc size down for a while until you gain the street experience. Second, see where they teach the MSF Ridersafe course where you live. It's very much worth the investment of time to learn right and not develop bad habits right off like most of us that didn't take the course did. They didn't have it when I learned to ride. I never realized the things I did that needed improvement until I took motor officer training a few years back. The things I learned made me a better biker and improved my general driving skills. Take full advantage of what is available now.

    Where I see riders potentially getting themselves in trouble is when they lose respect for the power between their legs (I'm sure someone is going to find the joke in that statement). When you don't respect the bike, it will bite you and it will leave a mark. The biggest group of riders that I've seen over the years that fall into this category is crotch rocket riders. Not all by any means, but enough. Those are go-fast bikes by design and just because one can doesn't mean that one should always, much less weave in and out of traffic and the stunts that I've seen. I've seen way more cruiser and Harley riders drive safely than the rockets. You can't blame the old lady in the Buick when you are riding like an a#@hole to begin with.

    I'm sure, or at least hope so, that your family wants you to stick around for a while. Learn smart.
     
  12. fmj

    fmj New Member

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    good advice here.

    My buddy cam home from 2 tours in Iraq and decided to by a harley, dropped $12,000, rode over to show it off and when he hopped off didnt fully engage the kickstand......over she went!

    ATV's DO NOT COUNT!!!

    Since you say you have ridden a bike on dirt, i would suggest for your first bike a used dual sport or enduro. The Suzuki DRZ 400 for example. (its what i ride ;)) Agile enough to get out of tight spots you can get into on the streets. (I have been forced onto curbs and into medians more than once) and i would have bit it had i been on a street bike. Fast enough to keep up with highway traffic.
     
  13. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    If I were looking used for my first bike I would find a nice unmodified used suzuki bandit in a 650 . they are pretty tame stock yet will still run fast enough to get ya killed , crotch rocket look without all the cheap easily broken plastic . I have had my share of dirt and street bikes and this would be a great choice for a first bike

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2012
  14. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    +1
    IIRC (someone correct me if I'm wrong), a "standard" bike might be a little less painful to insure as well. As soon as someone classifies it a a "sport" bike, it sets off alarm bells with insurance companies. If you do your homework, you don't really have to give up on performance or fun. Plus you aren't going to be folded up on it as much. I prefer the "Naked hooligan" look anyway. For instance, I'd much rather have a Street Triple than a 675 Daytona just because of the look. Aside from the styling, there isn't really a lot of difference. YMMV.
     
  15. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sound advice from a seasoned rider. I took the same course WJN is recomending afted 26 years of riding (both dirt and street, ATV and cycle), and am a much better (and safer) rider than I was before the course.

    As far as bike recomendations...

    I ride cruisers, and have only riden a couple of rockets. The best recomendation that I can give you is to check out an older, less expensive cruiser model such as the Yamaha XS 650 made from 1978-1984, or the Yamaha Virago 750 from the late 80's. Both models have a low center of gravity, great handling, and a huge amount of aftermarket support when it comes to replacement parts. Both can also be bought for less than $3500, which means you could start riding even sooner. The one add-on I would suggest is a case guard (crash bar, frame mounted, that helps protect your motor) for that inevitable lay-down. It is a case of WHEN AND HOW BAD, not if it will happen. Any rider who says they have never laid down a bike is either lying, or VERY lucky. The older bikes are made of steel when it cones to the body work, not plastic or other materials. Metal dents, carbon-fiber breaks. just a couple things to consider.

    Go old and cheap for now. Buy a nicer bike in a few years (after age 25 when your insurance cost will automatically lower by almost 50%), after you have some time in on the road. Whatever bike you go for remember that you are invisble to other drivers, no one in a car\bike crash ever admits to seeing the bike, and keep it shiny side up. Ride safe and enjoy!:)
     
  16. wjnfirearms

    wjnfirearms New Member

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    Good call on the Yamaha XS series. I had an' 81 XS 850 dresser that I bought new. I loved that bike and wish I still had it. Made a big mistake selling it when I did. I had a '79 XS 400 also and if he could find one of those still in decent shape, that would be a perfect starter bike. I rode that bike to Toronto and back keeping up just fine with my buddy's 1100 Special.
     
  17. knfxda

    knfxda New Member

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    If you are set on a 600, I would highly recommend the Honda CBR600 line. That is what I learned on. They are like point-and-shoot cameras. It does everything you want and it has good manners throughout the entire power curve. Just as fast as the others but better handling and a more managable power curve.
     
  18. Shihan

    Shihan Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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  19. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Want to get the rice rocket pilots' attention? Get one of these;

    [​IMG]

    .................................Knucklehead
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    ...........................
     
  20. rifleman1

    rifleman1 New Member

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    now thats a bike...