I could use some help on my Yugo 24/47

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by CA357, Jun 12, 2011.

  1. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I got it disassembled and pretty much de-cosmolined. However, I'm having trouble disassembling the rear sight. I removed the pivot pin, but can't get it loose. There's a piece of spring steel in there like a Mosin's front sight, so I tried depressing it, but that doesn't work. Any suggestions from you Mauser experts?

    The stock and handguard are oozing cosmoline and will go back out into the Sun for another day or two. I also found a fair amount of surface rust and would appreciate any solutions for that as well.

    I figure some oil and fine steel wool should clean it up and since it's covered by the stock and forearm, I figured I could just give it a coat of Oxpho Blue that I have laying around. Or is there a better cold blue for matching the existing blue? The steel that is exposed could use a touch up as well, so I'd like a cold blue that will match the stock blue/black. I'd really appreciate some input on this as well.
     
  2. Snakedriver

    Snakedriver New Member

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    CA, I know many purists will recoil in shock & horror, but I've degunked and restored many an old cosmoline soaked stocks using Easy-Off oven cleaner and warm water. Two 20-minute soakings will usually do the job. A stiff nylon brush to scrub the goo off when you wash off the oven cleaner will also help. Murphy's Oil Soap is also a good product to use as a wash after the oven cleaner treatment.

    The secret is to not let the Easy-Off stay on the stock for more than 20 minutes. Do it outside in a well ventilated area, wear rubber gloves and let the stock hang dry in the sun for a day and make sure it's 100% dry before proceeding with the next step. I assume you'll probably want to use a boiled linseed oil finish?
     

  3. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I'm old school, I cleaned the steel with gasoline. ;)

    I'm just going to let the Sun leech the stuff out of the wood.
     
  4. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Never mind, I found the info for the sight. I was close, just not quite there. However, I could really still use some input on the cold blue question.
     
  5. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Oxpho is as decent as most cold blues. I use Van's, and Blue Wonder has good reports. Key is going to be prepping the metal surface- polishing, degreasing, warming the metal before attempting to blue. Do NOT try to apply cold blue with steel wool- it will blue the steel wool instead of your gun. Use a NEW toothbrush- 5 for a buck from the dollar store. For a quickie polish I have used 600 grit wet or dry paper with a light oil, degrease with alcohol, warm with a blow dryer. Your mileage may vary.
     
  6. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Glad to see someone else who's not afraid to use this product in restoration work... I got into a big pissing match on another forum talking about this product. In all the "years" I've used this process, I have never once had a stock get burnt or discolored. When used properly, Easy-Off is every bit as good as any other chemical stripper you can find.

    My process involves using hot .. hot water to remove the gunk then air dry or sun dry before moving on to the rest of the finishing process..

    Did not mean to steal this thread from the OP but this was and is a hot topic for me... ( sorry )
     
  7. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    It's all good Old Man. The free exchange of ideas and opinions is what this place is about. :cool:
     
  8. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Thank you sir.. Btw, I read a little on Van's cold blue. I've always used BC or Oxpho blue myself but thinking about giving Van's a try. Purely based on C3's posting. The Van's website mentions dunking the parts in whole as well as applying via cotton cloth. I've dunked small parts in like that in the past and the part seems to take the blue better and more even.
     
  9. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Thanks, I'll look into Van's. There isn't any deadline on this, I don't foresee having ammunition for it until next month. (Budget considerations, moving was expensive with the usual unexpected costs. :eek: )
     
  10. Snakedriver

    Snakedriver New Member

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    Using Easy-Off cleaner on the old cosmoline soaked stocks has worked perfectly for me every time. I think it got a bad rep. because people were using it incorrectly and leaving it on too long. The maximum time I'll leave it on is 20-minutes. It breaks down the gunk and washes right off with warm/hot water. Letting the stock dry properly and completely before moving on and working it is another secret. Waiting is never fun, but patience is critical in restoration work. :cool:
     
  11. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Amen brother !
     
  12. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I use the heat method. Wrap the stock in brown paper, toss it in you car trunk. It will be cooked out in short order, a short scrub w/ simple green finishes it. Give it a few coats of BLO and your set. Birchwood Casey cold blue does a good job matching, just takes a few applications.
     
  13. bigedp51

    bigedp51 New Member

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    A Conservator at a museum will clean antique firearms in this manor.

    All metal parts are cleaned by applying olive oil and allow the oil to soak and penetrate for one or more days. The metal parts are then brushed with a soft bristled tooth brush to remove any surface contaminates.

    The Conservator cleans wooden stocks and parts with a mixture of 50% raw linseed oil and 50% turpentine. A small section of the wood is cleaned at a time by applying the 50/50 mix of linseed oil with a soft lint free cotton cloth. A heat lamp is used to help bring surface contaminates to the surface and to be removed with a dry soft lint free cotton cloth.

    No sand paper, no steel wool, no wire brushes, no easy off oven cleaner, no toxic chemicals and god forbid no dish washers.

    After cleaning the metal parts have a special CONSERVATION WAX applied to protect the metal from air and moisture.
    (oil attracts dirt and dust, dirt and dust absorbs moisture which causes rust)

    CONSERVATION WAX | RENAISSANCE WAX POLISH

    NOTE: During the American Civil War the triple mix of 1/3 raw linseed oil, 1/3 bees wax and 1/3 turpentine was used as a pre petroleum age cosmoline.

    NOTE #2: The same mixture was used by the lady of the house to polish her wooden furniture.
    (Pledge wasn't invented yet) :D

    NOTE #3 The same mixture was rubbed on firearms by hunters to give them protection against the elements.
    (a raincoat for wood and metal);)

    And for internal preservation............................

    [​IMG]
     
  14. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Well said Ed.

    I've been spending most of my time in the yard, not on the rifle. :eek:

    The stock is almost as purged of cosmoline as it will ever be. I'm giving it one more day in the Sun and I think that will do it. The steel is done. I removed the last of the cosmoline and scrubbed the chamber out today.

    There is some surface rust and some pitting that showed up today on the exterior of the wood covered portion of the barrel. Steel wool and oil is next.

    Then I will use actual gun cleaning products to get it properly cleaned. Then, I'll wipe it down with acetone and hit it with some cold blue. I'm going to go ahead and use the OxphoBlue since I already have it. Hopefully it will take well.

    The rifling looks really strong, but I'll know more after a thorough cleaning.

    The morning will be yard work with the afternoon spent on the rifle.

    Off the subject, but still on rifles, the Interarms Mark X is slated to be at the gunsmith's late tomorrow. :D
     
  15. bigedp51

    bigedp51 New Member

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    CA357

    I don't work in a museum so here are some other tips.

    Kroil eats rust and cleans barrels. (I soak all my metal parts in it because I'm not Italian) :rolleyes:

    A hair drier works better than a heat lamp for removing cosmoline and making raw linseed oil soak into the wood.
     
  16. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I have a full can of Kroil that I've never had occasion to use yet. I was thinking of running some Sweet's down the barrel today, then just using some Hoppe's Elite to finish up. The barrel looks really good, so I'd like to see what it really looks like.

    I've come down with some kind of head cold, so I don't know if I'll do much of anything today. :(
     
  17. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Must be the Whine country thing! Be careful, Nancy may buy you a man purse! Next you'll be shaving yourself. Please don't try and fly!!
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2011
  18. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I only shave if I have to, which isn't very often. :D

    And if Nancy tries to give me a "Murse" I will fill it with all the guns and ammunition that will fit. Then, I'll use it as an undercover Urban Assault pack. ;)