I am not an alarmist but.... about the outbreak

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by bluez, Jan 25, 2020.


  1. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Toilet paper. What's in your wallet?
     
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  2. Rentacop

    Rentacop Well-Known Member

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    From Sen. Doug Mastriano , Pennsylvania Update ( excerpt ) :

    ....Totals as of 3/25/2020 12:00 PM for COVID-19

    There are 1,127 confirmed positive in Pennsylvania; 276 new cases since yesterday, 11 confirmed deaths reported and 11,193 negative tests.

    The Governor is still listening to our requests for essential and life-sustaining businesses to be open. Here are the most recent changes

    Lumber and other construction materials merchants wholesalers - Yes.
    Sporting goods still NO, except for firearm dealers (see article below).
    Direct selling establishment is still NO, except for sellers of bottled water.
    Telecommunication resellers – Yes.
    Engineered wood products manufacturing – Yes.
    Other wood product manufacturing – Yes.
    Educational Services – Refer to Dept. of Ed.
    Excavating OK (considered landscaping).
    Roofing OK (it is considered home repair).

    Gov. Wolf allows gun shops to reopen on a limited basis during coronavirus pandemic after several PA Supreme Court justices urged him to do so....
     
  3. Rentacop

    Rentacop Well-Known Member

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    The following message may help us cope with it :


    By Scott Kelly
    Mr. Kelly is a retired NASA astronaut who spent nearly a year on the International Space Station.

    March 21, 2020

    Being stuck at home can be challenging. When I lived on the International Space Station for nearly a year, it wasn’t easy. When I went to sleep, I was at work. When I woke up, I was still at work. Flying in space is probably the only job you absolutely cannot quit.

    But I learned some things during my time up there that I’d like to share — because they are about to come in handy again, as we all confine ourselves at home to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. Here are a few tips on living in isolation, from someone who has been there.

    Follow a schedule

    On the space station, my time was scheduled tightly, from the moment I woke up to when I went to sleep. Sometimes this involved a spacewalk that could last up to eight hours; other times, it involved a five-minute task, like checking on the experimental flowers I was growing in space. You will find maintaining a plan will help you and your family adjust to a different work and home life environment. When I returned to Earth, I missed the structure it provided and found it hard to live without.

    But pace yourself

    When you are living and working in the same place for days on end, work can have a way of taking over everything if you let it. Living in space, I deliberately paced myself because I knew I was in it for the long haul — just like we all are today. Take time for fun activities: I met up with crewmates for movie nights, complete with snacks, and binge-watched all of “Game of Thrones” — twice.

    And don’t forget to include in your schedule a consistent bedtime. NASA scientists closely study astronauts’ sleep when we are in space, and they have found that quality of sleep relates to cognition, mood, and interpersonal relations — all essential to getting through a mission in space or a quarantine at home.

    Go outside

    One of the things I missed most while living in space was being able to go outside and experience nature. After being confined to a small space for months, I actually started to crave nature — the color green, the smell of fresh dirt, and the feel of warm sun on my face. That flower experiment became more important to me than I could have ever imagined. My colleagues liked to play a recording of Earth sounds, like birds and rustling trees, and even mosquitoes, over and over. It brought me back to earth. (Although occasionally I found myself swatting my ears at the mosquitoes. )

    For an astronaut, going outside is a dangerous undertaking that requires days of preparation, so I appreciate that in our current predicament, I can step outside any time I want for a walk or a hike — no spacesuit needed. Research has shown that spending time in nature is beneficial for our mental and physical health, as is exercise. You don’t need to work out two and a half hours a day, as astronauts on the space station do, but getting moving once a day should be part of your quarantine schedule (just stay at least six feet away from others).

    You need a hobby

    When you are confined in a small space you need an outlet that isn’t work or maintaining your environment.

    Some people are surprised to learn I brought books with me to space. The quiet and absorption you can find in a physical book — one that doesn’t ping you with notifications or tempt you to open a new tab — is priceless. Many small bookstores are currently offering curbside pickup or home delivery service, which means you can support a local business while also cultivating some much-needed unplugged time.

    You can also practice an instrument (I just bought a digital guitar trainer online), try a craft, or make some art. Astronauts take time for all of these while in space. (Remember Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield’s famous cover of David Bowie’s Space Oddity?)

    Keep a journal

    NASA has been studying the effects of isolation on humans for decades, and one surprising finding they have made is the value of keeping a journal. Throughout my yearlong mission, I took the time to write about my experiences almost every day. If you find yourself just chronicling the days’ events (which, under the circumstances, might get repetitive) instead try describing what you are experiencing through your five senses or write about memories. Even if you don’t wind up writing a book based on your journal like I did, writing about your days will help put your experiences in perspective and let you look back later on what this unique time in history has meant.

    Take time to connect

    Even with all the responsibilities of serving as commander of a space station, I never missed the chance to have a videoconference with family and friends. Scientists have found that isolation is damaging not only to our mental health, but to our physical health as well, especially our immune systems. Technology makes it easier than ever to keep in touch, so it’s worth making time to connect with someone every day — it might actually help you fight off viruses.

    Listen to experts

    I’ve found that most problems aren’t rocket science, but when they are rocket science, you should ask a rocket scientist. Living in space taught me a lot about the importance of trusting the advice of people who knew more than I did about their subjects, whether it was science, engineering, medicine, or the design of the incredibly complex space station that was keeping me alive.

    Especially in a challenging moment like the one we are living through now, we have to seek out knowledge from those who know the most about it and listen to them. Social media and other poorly vetted sources can be transmitters of misinformation just as handshakes transmit viruses, so we have to make a point of seeking out reputable sources of facts, like the World Health Organization and the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center.

    We are all connected

    Seen from space, the Earth has no borders. The spread of the coronavirus is showing us that what we share is much more powerful than what keeps us apart, for better or for worse. All people are inescapably interconnected, and the more we can come together to solve our problems, the better off we will all be.

    One of the side effects of seeing Earth from the perspective of space, at least for me, is feeling more compassion for others. As helpless as we may feel stuck inside our homes, there are always things we can do — I’ve seen people reading to children via videoconference, donating their time and dollars to charities online, and running errands for elderly or immuno-compromised neighbors. The benefits for the volunteer are just as great as for those helped.
     
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  4. Ghost1958

    Ghost1958 Well-Known Member

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    M O O N. That spells panicked overreaction.
     
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  5. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Well-Known Member Supporter

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  6. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What would they know, we have out own experts on the forum. :rolleyes:
     
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  7. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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  8. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Are the masks we were getting made in China? I know the hand sanitizer I’m using is. That might explain a lot.
    Avoid contact with the outside world helps a lot.
    Or we’re going to die of cancer absorbing all these chemicals.
     
  9. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    I sew and I’m going to make Balota and I masks with furnace filter HEPA material as a liner. That’s the best we can do. I have Cavi wipes and hand sanitizer. Also Lysol spray.
     
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  10. F4U

    F4U Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Winds have you researched this, just asking because the only thing I know about those filters is my vacuum cleaner has one! It sounds like a good idea in theory.

    Wonder how many rolls of tp I would have to trade for one?:p:p
     
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  11. Mister Dave

    Mister Dave Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Protects people from you. Worn by hospital workers, especially during surgeries.

    Very fashionable lately.

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    Does not protect people from you but is far better at protecting you from them.

    Not at all fashionable. Might make you look like a crazy person.

    Last time I checked they're still available on Amazon (edit: only in 4-packs of the small size 3M mask at $400 for the set - clearly price gouging. I got mine for a third of that price.).
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2020
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  12. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    Don’t worry about masks. No mask will protect you, short of a sealed hazmat suit with ventilation. Look at the Asians, they have worn masks in public for a decade now, still doing it, and looking like dorks, because they are. And guess where this outbreak started.

    But it’s their money. What you should know is that all mask testing focuses on particle and droplet retention. Disease spread is a complex process with many more variables. A true prospective controlled study of contagion, mask vs no mask vs something else would require a massive cohort of volunteers in the midst of an epidemic. This has not been done.

    What you can control is your hands. Even then getting covid may be unavoidable. I expect to get it. You should too. Most people recover, and more people probably don’t even notice.
     
  13. leadcounsel

    leadcounsel Active Member

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    Yup. Discovering his video series was the most important event I had this year. It saved me from 30+% market losses and allowed me to get way ahead of the curve on this and start sheltering in place many weeks ago.
     
  14. leadcounsel

    leadcounsel Active Member

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    At what point to people who are WOEFULLY UNEDUCATED on this topic just sit down and SHUT UP with bad info?

    Prevention like masks do, in fact, work. Japan and S. Korea are examples. These people are highly intelligent and versed in this and they immediately start self isolation, practice social distancing, and don masks. The result is far lower outbreaks and spread.

    ANY face covering will work to some degree, but obviously there are more effective coverings. A t-shirt tied across your mouth and nose offers some protection. For the really slow kids in class who still don't understand this, here is how the virus is transmitted and how masks help stop it. It's aerosolized in small particles, it's airborne on big particles, and it is on surfaces where people touch an infected surface and then touch mouth/nose/eyes. OBVIOUSLY to anyone with an IQ greater than a grapefruit, masks will at least mitigate some of these transmissions.

    1. An infected person releases less big particles when coughing or sneezing and is prevented from touching mouth/nose and then touching surfaces (railings, door knobs, handles, etc.) with the virus. Add ANY eye covering from glass or sealed goggles to improve results. Duh.

    2. A healthy person prevents at least some airborne transmission from being coughed on or sneezed on and breathing virus in, or breathing it in from the air. The degree is going to vary and is debatable, but it mitigates transmission in significance and %. Your body has a better chance of fighting off a small viral infection, than a huge dose of it. Further, healthy people are prevented from touching nose and mouth after touching an infected surface. Add glasses or sealed goggles to further reduce transmission. Duh.

    It's tragic that the education system has so badly failed modern humans. Where did your education fail you? People 100 years ago knew this stuff.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    The mask mostly protects others from the person wearing it. Not the other way around. There may be some benefit up close, but the studies are inconclusive. I have an advanced degree gained by a lot of schooling, which the quality of your writing tells me you don’t.
     
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  16. leadcounsel

    leadcounsel Active Member

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    My writing? Hahahahaha. I'm not the person who thinks masks don't reduce the spread. I'd rather be a inadequate writer on a interweb forum, than someone who failed elementary school and understands less about virology than people did in the early 1900s.
     
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  17. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    The mask works BOTH WAYS. in the hospital setting there is isolation and reverse isolation.
    In isolation, we need to keep from getting infected by the sick person. In highly contagious rooms, there is negative air flow pulling air away from the door, towards the back of the hospital room and is filtered and vented out.
    In REVERSE isolation, the patient is immunocompromised in some fashion, often due to cancer and chemotherapy. It is then OUR job to keep from giving this patient any illnesses that could very likely kill them.
    The masks work both ways, folks. Google it.
     
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