Hunting German Roe Deer

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by Jagermeister, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    My friends and I had an early morning hunt for Roe deer and Boar. I did not see boar, but I shot a two year old Roe Buck. He came into view from the left in picture five along the far tree line. First two females walked by, then he came into view. He sprinted right when I shot, so I was about an inch off the heart chamber. Three more doe and a buck arrived shortly, but they were moving to fast for a clean shot on the buck. We are in buck season until fall, then doe and under a year season starts until summer. There is a second set of pictures following this set that shows the meat processing area of our local hunters' butcher.
     

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  2. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    I removed the head for a skull and antler trophy to place on my desk at work. The buck weighed 13.7 kilos minus head and innards. The antlers are not massive like a Red Deer, in fact they are quite small. The most points I have ever seen on a Roe is eight. In the cooler there was a boar and another Roe. Mine is the one on the left. I found a pile of antlers on a table, but I am guessing the butcher is going to sell them. For my trophy, we first cut slits along the head, then we boil it for half an hour. Next we remove as much meat as possible. Then we allow flies to place eggs in the skull so that the maggots can eat the rest of the meat. Then we bleach the skull with paroxide. Well anyways, what a great morning!!!!!!
     

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  3. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    My friend took this picture of me before field dressing the Roe buck. You can see how small Roe deer are, but they are very fast on the run. I hunt with a CZ-550 chambered in .308. I only lost the liver and a small amount of meat on the entrance hole. I hunt Roe year round, so I always have deer meat in the freezer.
     

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  4. thatonespot

    thatonespot New Member

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    Very nice!
    It sounds like Roe would be a little more challenging than most of the deer we have in the states.
    Are Roe deer more skittish? I know they're smaller so a slightly smaller target, but how do they "act" in relation to say a whitetail deer?
     
  5. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    Roe are very skittish with unfamiliar noises and situations. For example, you can drive your car daily through the hunting revier, and they will ignore you. If you stop the car to look at them, they will jet. Hunters normally talk normally while hiking and working on the revier so the Roe get use to them. The Roe buck bark to warn other deer of danger. Yes, they bark like a dog. My beagle was shocked when a buck started barking back at him. It was very funny. Roe are very quite and you will not know they are there unless you eye them. I did not know the the two doe and buck were there until I looked behind and left of my high seat. I shot my buck right when he was jetting from the sound of my safety. I have shot Roe at full speed at over a hundred meters away in the heart or neck during drive hunts. The boar are also very fast!
     
  6. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    We hunt two more type of deer in the area. Fallow deer (damswild) which are larger deer with elk type antlers. Red deer (Rotwild) which are large with huge trophies. Roe deer are called Rehwild. Here are pictures of a female Fallow deer. Sorry, no pictures of a male.
     

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  7. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Active Member

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    Your Roe Deer look very similar in size to our Hog Deer.
    It looks like a .222 or similar would probably suffice to take 1 of them out as they're a very skinned animal.

    Well done on the shot and they are a very pretty looking deer.
     
  8. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    Thank you. You are right about the smaller cartridge. A little bigger, the .223 is the most common cartridge a hunter uses in his/her dedicated Roe rifle. I would like to hunt a roe with my new AR in the near future. Do you have any pics of the hog deer?
     
  9. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the pics.:cool:
    Your shoot house and hunting area don't look any different than the ones here in Alabama!!!!:D
    But the cleaning area looks a whole lot different than the inside of my barn where I gut and skin my deer and hogs!!!;)
     
  10. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Arizona dear................................................
     

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  11. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can find those 'dear' everywhere! No bag limit, no licence need.
    And some of them are truly 'wild meat'!!!!:eek:
     
  12. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Active Member

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    They're roughly about the size of a Labrador dog and stand approximately 28" at the shoulder.
     

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  13. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    My friend also recently shot a younger Roe Buck.....

    In Germany a branch is placed on an animal as a sign of respect to animal, and communication to other hunters. A sharpened point of the branch towards head means male. The other side towards head means female. A branch is also torn off a tree (not cut) and placed in the right side of the mouth. This is called the last bite (the animals final meal).

    Hunters also communicate warnings, direction of animals, place where an animal ran off after being shot...etc. The branches are shaped and placed in such a way as to communicate various things. Non-hunters would have no idea that they passed a means of communication, nor what it means.
     

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