howa 1500 204 ruger break in procedure

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by luke1999, Nov 30, 2012.

  1. luke1999

    luke1999 New Member

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    I have just bought a howa 1500 in 204 ruger and it tells me about a break in procedure to harden the steel and to maintain accuracy by firing cleaning and letting the barrel cool and repeating and basically shooting a box of shells. Can anyone tell me if this is really needed.
     
  2. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    Different strokes for different folks....

    Some industry experts say yes, some no. I know that benchrest shooters swear by it.

    My precision guns get broken in, one shot, clean, repeat ... for at least 10 rounds. But by clean, I mean NOTHING on the patch for the final swab.
    Hunting guns just get shot.
     

  3. luke1999

    luke1999 New Member

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    Hey thanks for the info
     
  4. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    100 percent agree. I clean with Sweet's 7.62 between shots. and I do mean CLEAN! Down to the bare metal.

    Then clean every two shots for the next 10. Fred Sinclair's system is good enough for me!:)
     
  5. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    if the manufacturer suggests using a particular method for breaking in the barrel, then do it. i follow a break in method on every new rifle i purchase. reason is, if it works fine, but at the very least if it doesn't, cleaning the bore properly isn't going to hurt anything.

    when i buy a used rifle, one of the first things i do is a proper bore cleaning. you would be suprised at how dirty some can be! many gunsmithing books will tell you to start with a proper bore cleaning in the search for accuracy problems.
     
  6. kytowboater

    kytowboater Active Member

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    Dad cleans after every shot for 20 rounds. I've not owned a rifle nice enough.
     
  7. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Several years ago, a good friend bought me his Sako 7MM Remington magnum to sell at a gun show.

    I knew he loved this rifle, so I asked why he wanted to sell it. He told me the bore was shot out.

    I took the rifle to my workbench, and looked through it with a bore light. It looked almost like a smooth bore.

    I cleaned it with Sweet's 7.62 several times. when it looked clean, I used the Outer's Foul Out to get the last traces of copper out.

    I brought the rifle back to Ralph, and asked him to shot it before deciding to sell.

    A couple of weeks later, he called me, very excited, and told me that the Sako shot better groups that it had when it was new.
    No way would he sell it.

    I asked him how he cleaned the bore. He said that his father had taught him that with modern ammo there was no need to clean the bore.:eek:

    I took Ralph to the LGS and got him to buy a large bottle of Sweet's, a steel one piece cleaning rod and an Outer's Foul Out.

    10 years later, his beloved 7mm Sako still shoots 3/4 MOA.:):)
     
  8. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Darn near all serious BR and varmint shooters use one piece steel rods. Grit doesn't embed into the steel and scratch the bore. Coated one piece rods are also good.

    But aluminum and all jointed rods should be avoided.
    (occasional use in the field is okay)
     
  9. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    I use the hoppes coated one piece rods. Steel might be good for the military, but it won't go in my bores.
     
  10. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I like the Dewey coated rods as well. But bare steel is perfectly safe. I vuse both coatred and bare steel regularly.:)
     
  11. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Same here. I have a steel rod that was made by my old buddy, a smith, and the customer never picked it up. It gets used on really bad bores. 99.9% of the time I use an Otis system. But there is always a nasty bore that needs a good ridged rod to scrub it clean. I also have used outers foaming. The Otis cable system just is not practical as the foam needs to be pushed out.
     
  12. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I have seen a number of ruined military rifles that were cleaned with a steel rod. The rifling was gone near the bore from cleaning with a steel rod. This was the most common fault with SKS and AK rifles that flooded gun shops in the 80's. You could buy em for $50 each but you had to go check them carefully to leave with a functioning and accurate rifle.
     
  13. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They weren't ruined by STEEL rods, they were ruined by JOINTED rods.

    Read Fred Sinclair's information on bore cleaning. (Fred is one of the foremost bench rest authorities)