how young is to young?

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by Ray_Ray, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. Ray_Ray

    Ray_Ray New Member

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    At what age did you start teaching your kids about guns? At what age did you let them shoot, and what did you start them out with?
     
  2. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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    At what age did you start teaching your kids about guns?- The day they started moving around the house via their own arms and legs

    At what age did you let them shoot,- Only when I knew for a fact they understood what they were going to do

    and what did you start them out with?- Toy Gun, if they cant learn to respect it, they cant have a real one
     

  3. rifleman1

    rifleman1 Active Member

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    this sums it up.
     
  4. Ray_Ray

    Ray_Ray New Member

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    Yeah we are past those parts. Just was trying to get other dads input. I have a 14 yo girl and 7 yo boy. Both love shooting and both know not to touch my guns unless I am with them.
     
  5. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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    If they are ready and so are you, a nice midsized 22 single shot or bolt action is a great starter for your daughter and a BB gun for your son. Store them with your weapons and make them care for them just like dad does. I would have your Daughter take the Hunter safety course even if she doesnt want to hunt. She will learn some things but also get a chance to meet others her age that enjoy safe firearm usage. Get your son to the course before he gets his first real gun.
     
  6. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You teach them about guns as soon as they notice that they exist in the home. You teach them to stay the hell away from them. When they are old enough to have a full understanding of the concept of sudden, violent death, and are physically capable of handling a gun without assistance, then you might want to begin to teach them to shoot. What age? It depends on the kid. Some may be ready by age 12 others are not ready at the age of 35.
     
  7. jebsca

    jebsca New Member

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    I think you are right for the most part. At this time, we have three bb guns in my safe, even though space is getting short in the safe. I also get the idea that the OP's kids may be a bit farther along than the first post lead on to.

    Age is not how you will know. My son is 12, and by most peoples standard, should be able to shoot a single shot 22 with minimal supervision. The probkem with that is he is also autistic, and we are only at the let him hold a gun and learn to respect it stage. I have a coworker that has a son of 6 or 7 that has been shooting for about two years now. If you think that is too young, I was 7 wheni fired my first semi auto pistol. Learned then that you can have troo hight of a grip. I don't remember when I started shooting, but I remember that I was the oldest grandkid shooting, and the only one shooting a semi auto that day.
     
  8. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    16 is the minimal age at all the ranges in my area. Still, My 13 daughter enjoys all my "water guns", and she looks 16;) My 16 yo son learned around that age too.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2013
  9. Ray_Ray

    Ray_Ray New Member

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    Yeah I have started both of them out on bb guns. I have a simi-auto 22 and bolt action 22. My daughter doesn't like shooting them that much, and I have let my son shoot it a few times and loves them. We are going out shooting them today. My daughter talks about going hunting all the time but really doesn't show much intrest in shooting. I'm not going to force her to but I do want her to know how to use and respect one. My son on the other hand, well lets just say he is allllll boy! THANK GOD! But I was wanting to know what would be the next level? I would like to get a small 22 pistol, to get them familiar with the feel of a pistol. Good or bad idea?
     
  10. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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    God Bless you Jeb, the challenges are many for those without DD's, my 7 yo Grandson is also Autistic and his life can never be that which he deserves but we will do what we can to make it as good as it can be. I dont see a day coming when he will ever inherit any of my weapons and thats a bit sad. He is a real whiz at so many things, but connecting mono e mono with the real world just isnt one of them.

    I got my first bb gun when I was 8 and my first 22 when I was 12. I was allowed to go shooting and hunting alone at 14 but could only shoot with friends if an adult was present until I was 16. Age is a government thing not reality, each child develops differently but teaching them as young as possible will instill it into their brains. Teach them young and often!
     
  11. Ray_Ray

    Ray_Ray New Member

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    Yes my nephew is autistic, and (his dad) my brother-in-law is an avid outdoorsman and hunter. They can't allow him to fire guns. I think, although my broinlaw has never said, that kinda upsets him. Because he isn't able to spend that time with his son. But I think that's where my son gets it from. He has ways bought my son toy guns.
     
  12. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I get this question A LOT from my students who are parents! Here is how I answer.
    You start when a child starts asking questions about guns (sex or drugs). This can be very young, or never, in this case you need to intervene and educate them when you see fit. As to when they shoot the first time, that is strictly a judgement call by the parents. There can be no 'one size fits all' on this one. Size, strength, coordination, attitude, and knowledge are some of the considerations but not all.
    BUT you MUST educate people, especially young people, about firearms, sex, and drugs. I call it the 'forbidden fruit syndrome'! The more you tell a human being 'thou shalt not', and do not show/explain in a realistic manner why, the more they are inclined to try it to see why they are not supposed to, especially a YOUNG human being!!
    So start when they ask and proceed according to your judgment, but for God sake do not approach this with the statement "They are bad just stay away from them", it will not work!!! :(
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2013
  13. readygirl

    readygirl New Member

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    We have kids of all ages come thru our First Shots Safety class. Age limit on the ranges is 12. And the have to share a lane with an adult member until age 16. I agree with the others, its not so much about age, as it is maturity. As an RSO, i have had to ask people of all ages to leave the range due to unsafe attitude/actions. Growing up in the Tenn. mountains, i had my own Marlin 60 when i was 11yrs old, kept it in my room (loaded most of the time) the same for my brothers. I cant think of any time i didn't have access to a firearm if i needed it. We had snakes on, and under the porch. As soon as we could walk we were out setting up targets for Dad/gramps/uncles. Guns were just an everyday part of life. We were watched closely for a while, but guns were everywhere. Dad was a Scott Co. Deputy, so all his cop buddies would come out to shoot at our place....Im getting homesick...so thats it.
     
  14. QueenGlamis

    QueenGlamis New Member

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    We started our kids pretty young. Our son shot AR when he was about 6 or 7 from a sitting position and all the kids are hooked. We have a Beretta Neos 22LR pistol that they LOVE. it is accurate as hell, cheap and fun to shoot. He loves it, is hyper-aware of safety and reloads his own mags. It is crazy how accurate the kids are with pistol and rifles, maybe it is all those video games that help lol.
     

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  15. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    My Dad was career Military & Career Federal LEO. He made me very aware early one that Dad's Guns were for Enforcing the law, and he fired Giant guns In the Army while at war (Howitzers) by the time i was 10 he had taught me enough that when he said "do your homework, or off to Germany to dig trenches for NATO!" he was serious BTW....
     
  16. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    It really depends on the maturity of the parents. Parents who approach life in general in a mature manner pass this on to their children. It is not just about firearms. Teaching responsibility in all things makes a more understanding adult. Teach by example at any age.:)
     
  17. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    I started shooting a .410 when I was 8 or 9. My first day on my own in a dove shoot with my Uncle's 20 ga Remington Sportsman was when I was 11. Got my very own Rem. 1100 for Christmas at 12. We did not have a gun safe, my Daddy had a belt, I left the guns alone.

    But a safe might have kept my 1100 from getting stolen. :(
     
  18. RaySendero

    RaySendero Member

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    My son started getting interested in guns and hunting at age 5. He would sit and watch while I cleaned a rifle or was reloading. As we talked he learn respect and to never touch a gun unless I was present and he had my permission. I took him dove hunting with me. He didn't shoot but was the best retrevier I've ever had. He also learned to the clean doves and latter that year - ducks.

    When he was 8, I bought him a pellet rifle (very safe - As he could not pump it himself). We would spend time target shooting together. At age 9, I got him a shotgun. Cut two 3/4" slices off the butt and added a lace up leather recoil pad with that space age silly putty suff. Had to reload very light loads for him. But he learned to shoot skeet with it - In a little over 2 years he could shoot and hold his own with any team of shooters at the range.

    We would also target practice with a 22LR at the range. He caught the eye of the shooting coach and was asked to be a youth member. He did well in his first match. Afterward, He and I were watching the 22 adult class shoot. I was talking him through what they were doing and why. Made a comment that "I could do that well" and the coach over heard me. So he set me up to shoot in the second group out. I got 3rd place overall and was also asked to be on the team, too. We had a great time together going to these rifle shoots.

    We continued to shoot skeet and he was dove hunting with me at age 11. For the first year he had to stay right beside me after that he could set-up by himself but close enough so he could hear me and I could see him. At age 13 he began to duck hunt with me and at age 15 we began to deer hunt together.
     
  19. TheDesertFox

    TheDesertFox New Member

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    I recieved a BB gun at 5 and a single shot bolt action .22 at 6 or 7. I am now 15 and understand firearms and how to safely operate them better than some adults I know. I think this is mostly due to my interest in firearms and the military, but my parents definitely contributed to it. Study or review all firearms safety rules before teaching them anything. Get them hearing and eye protection if they dont already have it. Keep it fun for them by using reactive targets such as cans and clay pigeons. Always keep an eye on them so they don't do anything unsafe. I'm sure I could ramble on, but I won't. Be safe and have fun.
     
  20. Garadex

    Garadex New Member

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    I didn't get my first gun till I was 15 a and only shot a bb gun when I was 8. I didn't shoot a .22 till I was 14. Although we had a handgun in the house my dad literally never took it out. He didn't gain interest in firearms until I started to ask about 'em. After that his enjoyment of them cam back after not shooting for more than 10 years. Now it has become the bonding thing between the 3 males in the house. Although we have taken my mom and sister they didn't enjoy it as much as we do. I would never trade anything for the time I get to spend with my dad and brother. My dad works 12 hours a day sometime 6 days a week and to add to that he works the nightshift. Guns brought me, him and my brother closer and i'm going to enjoy the time I have with him no matter what. I will also never stop fighting to keep my firearm rights so I can share similar memories with my kids one day.