How to

Discussion in 'California Gun Forum' started by wiliardo123, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. wiliardo123

    wiliardo123 New Member

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    Went to the range and asked the range master to help zero my red dot sight. the gun was firing up, I told him if you are adjusting the rear sight you have to move up as well because your view from the back indicates that you are looking from a lower level that's why the muzzle was pointing up so you adjust the rear sight up as well to level it...
    Anyways long story short He couldn't do it and I couldn't do it either. what the heck?
    What is the proper way to zero the sights and do I have to adjust every single time if advancing from 25 to 50 yards??
     
  2. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    The rear sight is adjusted to the same direction you want to adjust bullet impact. Rear sight up to move POI up, rear sight down to move POI down, right = right, left = left.

    On scopes and red dots, there should be an arrow on the adjustment knob, these are almost always indicating the direction you will be moving the bullet strike during adjustment.

    For instance, if the arrow says "up" and is pointing counter clockwise, then you turn the knob counter clockwise to move the bullet impact up. Opposite for the other direction, and windage adjustments are accomplished the same way.
     

  3. wiliardo123

    wiliardo123 New Member

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    Thanks a lot
     
  4. Fixer

    Fixer New Member

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    To zero a RDS, the best way would be to zero the Iron Sights first at 25 or 50 yards depending on what cross zero you want. Then just adjust the dot to sit right on the tip top of the front post as seen through the rear peep sight.

    zero at 50 yards will have a flat trajectory out to about 200 yards, then will drop off quite fast.
    zero at 25 yards will have a 10" rise at 200 yards, then a cross zero at like 375 yards.

    10" at 200 yards is nothing when dealing with an RDS. A 2MOA dot is 4" wide at 200 yards. A 4MOA dot is 8" wide at 200 yards. So if you are using a 4MOA Dot your point of impact will be just above your point of aim if your target is 200 yards away.

    The benefit to a 25 yard zero is the 375 yard cross zero which allows you to aim directly at an object nearly 400 yards away and hit where you aim. With a 50 yard zero you must aim above the target and drop your shots into it.

    The advantage of a 50 yard zero over the 25 yard zero is a 50 yard zero is point of aim = point of impact out to 200 yards.

    This is also 55gr .223 FMJ which reacts close to these figures, while you will need to play with the math for your type of ammo. Rifle twist also plays a big role too.