How to remove stains from a vintage pistol

Discussion in 'Cleaning and Maintenance' started by VolcanosGoBoom, Dec 28, 2017.

  1. VolcanosGoBoom

    VolcanosGoBoom Member

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    Chainfire, sorry for the late reply. I really appreciate the tip about acetone, I didn't even know you could use that stuff on guns. As much as I hate to admit it, you're probably right about the blood permanently etching the finish. It's a real shame considering the finish was much nicer and uniform before this whole tragedy happened.

    And hey, no worries about that personal question, I completely understand. It's sad to know that there are gun enthusiasts who've gone through the same thing I have, and while I know some go out of their way to reclaim their firearms and restore them, I know many out there either sell them or have them destroyed, and those are perfectly reasonable decisions. I honestly agree with you, in general even just the thought of keeping a firearm used in a suicide, especially if you knew the person or were close them, can be quite disturbing and even downright scary. When I learned I could get our 1911 back, I questioned myself for a bit, wondering if I was so desensitized by the violence in our society and my thoughts were so clouded with my love of guns that I'd overlook this terrible, traumatic incident with my father and what he did with it, just so I could keep this old collectible 1911. I've even thought about selling it since it's still worth quite a bit, even in the state it's in now, and put that money towards another collectible firearm that I could enjoy just as much if not more. But as weird as this sounds, this is one gun I never planned to let go, even after what my dad with it. I feel such a strong connection with it since it's got a lot of family history, and I feel that in spite of what it's been through, a part of my dad's soul will remain with me as long as I keep it. I know that sounds weird, but hopefully I worded it in a way that you understand.
     
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  2. VolcanosGoBoom

    VolcanosGoBoom Member

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    Again, completely understandable. As morbid as it may seem, there is a certain curiosity and interest for mil surp guns knowing that they were actually used in combat. But like you said, the main difference is that you don't know those people and could never imagine how the weapon had been used, but for something so personal like what my dad did, I completely understand where you're coming from.

    In regards to maintaining and cleaning this 1911, thank you so much for your support, Chainfire!
     
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  3. VolcanosGoBoom

    VolcanosGoBoom Member

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    C3, sorry for the late reply, but wow, thank you so much for your condolences and this wonderful advice! I've always been interested in the bluing process and how it works once I really got into guns, but wow these past several weeks I've learned so much about it what with doing lots of research to get a better idea of what happened to our poor 1911. Of course, your explanation pretty much sums up the articles I've read, and as much as I hate to admit, you're absolutely right about the finish being worn off. The closer you look near the cocking serrations, there's a pretty noticeable contrast with the bluing. I definitely don't want to have it refinished in the off chance I ever do choose to sell it or a future child of mine decided to sell it.

    I really appreciate your acknowledgement of my local gunsmith and priest! (Love the beer comment, haha!) They've definitely helped give me peace of mind over this whole ordeal, as you guys have too here on this forum.

    Sincerely, thank you so much for this heartfelt and inspiring comment, C3. You're absolutely right, as the weeks have gone by since I got our 1911 back, I've been getting used to the way it looks now. I even take it out occasionally to admire it still, in spite of the worn finish. At this point I'm just extremely grateful for having the opportunity to enjoy this firearm when my dad was still with me. When I was old enough, he'd let me take it out, take it apart, and even take it to the range a few times to put a few rounds through. Once I got out of college, I'd bring it with me to the range once in a while to share with my friends before my Peace Corps service started. Definitely precious memories I'll carry with me for the rest of my life. Even now I cherish this old warhorse for serving our country for so long, and most of all serving by the hands of loved ones in my family.

    "Let it be"- good mantra to live by.
     
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