How to remove bolt from Mosin-Nagant

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by RufusTFirefly, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. RufusTFirefly

    RufusTFirefly New Member

    127
    0
    0
    Just picked up a Russian 1891 Mosin-Nagant today at a gunshow (totally impulse buy- $100)

    Prior to today, I had zero knowledge/experience with these rifles. My initial two questions are:

    1. How does one remove the bolt?

    2. Is there any type of safety mechanism?

    Thanks for any help...

    Rufus
     
  2. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    Very simple to get the bolt out.

    As always, first step is to clear the rifle and ensure that all rounds are cleared from the chamber AND the magazine. There is a thumb latch on the bottom of the magazine near the trigger guard. Open it and let any rounds drop out the bottom, do not cycle any rounds through the action with the bolt until you have determined the condition of the gun...a damaged or incorrectly assembled bolt or firing pin could "slam fire" the gun.

    Once the gun is cleared and safe simply open the action, hold back the trigger and slide the bolt back and out of the receiver. Reassemble by reversing these steps.

    There is a rudimentary safety on the MN, the rear of the bolt pulls out, rotate about 15 degrees and sit into notch on bolt at about the 10:00 o'clock position. Not very useful when you are being shot at but works for transport I guess. :)

    http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinDisassembly.htm
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2011

  3. RufusTFirefly

    RufusTFirefly New Member

    127
    0
    0
    Jpyle: Thank you so much for the info. Yes, the bolt came right out! As for the "safety", I really don't like it (it's cumbersome) I will pretend that this gun doesn't have one. And thank you also for the link. Good stuff. THANK YOU!

    Rufus
     
  4. RufusTFirefly

    RufusTFirefly New Member

    127
    0
    0
    Thank you Tom.. mine has the "Tula" star- 1939. I would like to imagine it had seen combat service against the Germans (nothing against the members from Germany :) )

    Rufus
     
  5. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    Given the state of the Russian military during the war that's not too hard to imagine. These rifles weren't produced from scarce resources to sit in a warehouse, they went straight to the front lines. With that in mind, check the bore at the muzzle for signs of counterboring. Most of the cleaning was done muzzle to chamber and the rifling was invariably damaged at the muzzle on a good number of the in-service guns. The ones that survived the war were counterbored to return them to usable accuracy.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. RufusTFirefly

    RufusTFirefly New Member

    127
    0
    0
    Jpyle: This is what I'm getting with mine on some Chezc 7.62x54 surplus. What do you think? (pic out of focus, but red band is where bullet meets case)

    Rufus
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    Looks like it could be counterbored but the bullet test is not 100% since a worn barrel will also allow the bullet to drop in. Shine a light down the barrel, the counterbore will be clearly visible, there will be a ridge or shoulder where the counterbore ends, about 1/2" or so, and the bored section will not have any visible rifling. A counterbored rifle is perfectly servicable and will be more accurate than an original rifle with a damaged crown so there is really no downside to having one, it's just one way to determine if the rifle was issued and used; although no actual determination can be made unless it's a captured rifle.
     
  8. RufusTFirefly

    RufusTFirefly New Member

    127
    0
    0
    I don't have a way to capture a pic, but just by eyesight, I can see rifling throughout the entire length of the barrel...

    Rufus
     
  9. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    Ok, well that seals the deal...not counterbored. You've got yourself a nice rifle there, a '39 Tula is something most would drool over, I've got a '38 Izhevsk that I just got cleaned up and range ready.

    http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f37/mosin-clean-up-50737/
     
  10. RufusTFirefly

    RufusTFirefly New Member

    127
    0
    0
    Jpyle, that nice to hear- can't wait to get 'er out and see what she's capable of...

    Rufus
     
  11. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    What condition is the rifle in, was it previously owned and cleaned up or is it a recent import. Reason I ask is that a new import will generally require a thorough cleaning before you can safely shoot it. At a minimum check the firing pin protrusion (>=.075" and <.095") and have the headspace checked.

    [​IMG]


    Also be sure and clean the barrel and chamber immediately upon returning home from the range, at the range if possible...hot water or Windex is all you really need. The Mil-Surp commie ammo is corrosive and will rust up the barrel really fast but it's a salt based substance and water soluble.
     
  12. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

    5,339
    318
    83

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 6, 2011
  13. RufusTFirefly

    RufusTFirefly New Member

    127
    0
    0
    Tom, that is a cool chart! Like a family tree. I would like to see that in poster size.

    jpyle, I bought it from a private party who said he's had it for a few years. I don't know anything about it's history beyond that. The stock looks very good, with very minimal dings, if any. The barrel looks pretty shiny with hardly any pitting that I can see. The two barrel clamps seem to fit a little loose, but other than that it seems like a gem.

    Rufus
     
  14. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    Sounds like you're good to go. Many Mosin's are purchased straight out of storage so there is some clean up to do...the previous owner has already done that job for you. Best of luck...post up a range report when you get some trigger time.
     
  15. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

    5,506
    901
    113
    You will have to be dang careful with that Mosin. I bought my first one two years ago, now I am working of filling my second case of the nasty things. Mosinitis will strike without warning and has been known to empty bank accounts and end marriages.

    Your 91/30 is a fine gun, and you will enjoy it, then you can look for a M-1944.
     
  16. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    Rufus, another way to check for counter boring is to simply run a toothpick or bic pen down the muzzle and feel for a defined ledge inside the muzzle. Good luck, I'll bet your gonna love it. My '38 Tula is awesome. I overpaid a little bit I think, but that's really a matter of opinion, as I'm extremely happy with it.
     
  17. RufusTFirefly

    RufusTFirefly New Member

    127
    0
    0
    Just double checked for counterboring- she's intact!
     
  18. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

    8,409
    4
    0
    I got into Mosins M44 first.

    I started with a Polish 1955 model which needed a complete

    Cosmoline de-gunking, and I liked it so much, I snapped up

    a Russian M44 I found shortly later.

    Then I happened upon this 1933 Tula 91-30 with a hex barrel,

    and all matching serial #s, oh my.

    I'm finding the M44s to be insane fun, and also great truck and

    Boar guns...
     
  19. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

    1,014
    0
    0
    Chainfire is absulutely correct.. Mosin's seem to breed in my safe as well.. I simply cannot pass by one if I see them at my local shop. Hard to pass up a perfectly fine shooter for $100.. Or even worse if you've got your C&R license like me and can get them for $80..