How to load my own ammo?

Discussion in 'DIY Projects' started by zmanstrong, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. zmanstrong

    zmanstrong New Member

    5
    0
    0
    I live in central Wisconsin and can't seem to find a place to learn how to load my own ammo, even some of the places that sell the equipment to load have no idea where I can go to learn how to use the equipment they want to sell me....any ideas?
     
  2. fupuk

    fupuk New Member

    1,672
    0
    0
    Pretty much all of the things ive learned about reloading has either been from reading or online. I bought a prees and all the other items I needed a few months ago and I just this past week made my first rounds. Get the ABC's of reloading and start reading. It will show you how to set up and what to do and what to look for. Im not the best reloader but I was in the same boat as you are. No one I know reloads and really didnt know where to start. Hope this helps.
     

  3. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

    4,282
    52
    48
    there are many great books on reloading. a reloaders first purchase should be a book on reloading.
     
  4. Colby

    Colby New Member

    461
    0
    0
    Lots of books out there.
    And lots of youtube videos to backup the books.
    Youtube's got videos on just about anything you want to know how to do.
     
  5. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

    4,992
    51
    48
    +1 on the book. You can learn everything you need from a good book. When you start reloadiing use starting load data. Then work up to max if you like. But max is max. Dont go beyond it.
     
  6. srtolly1

    srtolly1 New Member

    206
    0
    0
    There is a guy in Oceola that offers a service that sounds like what you want. If you PM me your email address and I'll pass it on to him.
     
  7. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    the book, The ABC's Of Reloading is an excellent book to learm many of the basics of reloading. it will walk through the process step by step. pay very close attention to all the safety guidelines and procedures, as they are there for very good reason, your safety.

    reloading can be a very safe hobby or addition to shooting if done properly and safely. if not, there is the potential to do great harm to yourself and others. again and i can not stress this enough, follow he procedures and work safely.

    buy and read several load data books. one of my favorites is Lee's Modern Reloading data load book. it's a load data book along with it goes into much detail about the reloading process. lots of good information in that book.

    first thing, get the ABC's of Reloading and read it then reread it several more times. then if you have any questions come back here and ask them.
     
  8. 7.62 Man

    7.62 Man New Member

    904
    0
    0
  9. zmanstrong

    zmanstrong New Member

    5
    0
    0
    Wow thanks for all the information and advice, pretty cool how you all jump in there to help a guy out!!! thanks :)
     
  10. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    we are more than happy to share our knowledge so that others may share in our addictions, errrrrr mean, ..... hobbies!:eek::D
     
  11. srtolly1

    srtolly1 New Member

    206
    0
    0
    You had it right axxe, its an addiction. I really like tuning a load till I get the best groups then I change something and keep working it.
     
  12. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    no, no, no, ....... you have to keep telling yourself it's a hobby!:D

    but in all seriosness, i enjoy reloading as an addition to my shooting and also as well, like working up a load and trying for the most accuracy out of it.
     
  13. Colby

    Colby New Member

    461
    0
    0
    I'm not a reloader ............... yet........ Never really considered it.
    But..
    Seems like I read on another thread that reloads for something like .357 costs only about $.07 per cartridge. Is that true??
    Is that a typical cost for most reloads?
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  14. fupuk

    fupuk New Member

    1,672
    0
    0
    It depends on what type of bullet you use. If your buying bullets that number is low for what I just bought. Now if you get lead and cast your own bullets that is very plausible. If you get your lead from a very cheap source, like a mom and pop tire shop It will onky cost you time to make bullets.
     
  15. Colby

    Colby New Member

    461
    0
    0
    fupuk

    Thanks, man. I appreciate.
     
  16. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member Supporter

    3,595
    361
    83
    Appx .18 cents each for 357 with gold dots on top. According to the last batch(500) i loaded. Lead self cast would have run me about .11 each. This is not counting my time, about 6 hrs the way they were loaded. 10-12 if i had cast , sized and lubed this many bullets.

    Ive been reloading for 20 years and have a lee loadmaster as my high speed press. Paid for itself years ago...
     
  17. Jstrong

    Jstrong New Member

    984
    0
    0
    Quick question? Are there significant savings to be gained fin rolling your own .45 auto? I've heard certain main stream calibers aren't worth the effort such as x39 and 9mm and such
     
  18. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    a lot of it depends on how many rounds you shoot, the amount of bulk components and what type of reloading equipment you use, and your time in relation to reloading. yes it can be.

    i reload 44 Mag., 44 SPL. and 45 ACP. i reload with the same type bullets that i can get in factory ammo, and use my reloads for practice of what i use for SD. i can reload practice ammo cheaper than using factory ammo for practice.