How to break in a barrel properly?

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by vito77, Nov 27, 2011.

  1. vito77

    vito77 New Member

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    whats the proper way to break you barrel in how many rounds should i shhot before cleaning it and so forth..any suggestions.
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    i just do a thorough cleaning to get the shipping gunk out and go shoot. i dont follow any magic rituals ;)
     

  3. EagleSix

    EagleSix New Member

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    vito,

    What make, model, and caliber is your rifle....that will help get a more specific answer.

    .
     
  4. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Well for some, like this:D....

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRRahHX9Zkg]Proper Barrel Break-in Procedure - YouTube[/ame]

    But for others, something like this...

    Break-In & Cleaning
     
  5. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    I usually shoot 1rd & clean the first 10 shots,then shoot 3rds and clean for 5 sets.Always let the barrel cool between shots during a break in.If it's too hot to hold,it's too hot to shoot.
     
  6. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    It might depend to a point on the firearm. Lever action,, clean lube and shoot it. High end bolt rifle I will follow kreigers breakend instrutions. Bargan rifle or used ,clean well lube and shot a bit and clean again and go from there.
     
  7. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    I think this is a good way to do it if you don't have the manufacturers' barrel break-in recommendations.
     
  8. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    My Process

    There are a lot of opinions on breaking in a barrel and different opinions on whether or not it is even needed. I personally believe it is an important process for getting the most accuracy out of your gun. My breakin process is based on an interview with Kenny Jarret that I read many years ago. I believe the article was in Field and Stream but I haven’t been able to find it since. If anyone out there has the article please chime in. This is my current break in process, which originated with that article. I know it is not the “exact” process recommended by Jarret, but very close.

    New Barrel Break in:

    1. Clean the barrel with wire brush and solvent – always from the muzzle. Then clean with a wet patch and solvent. Finally clean with a dry patch. All ways finish cleaning with a dry patch and make sure the patch is spotless and dry (if patch is wet then get another clean dry patch and repeat).
    2. Fire one shot and clean (repeat 3 times)
    3. After 3rd shot wrap a patch around a brush (a well-used brush) and JB bore cleaner to the patch (use just enough to coat the patch). Run the rod thru the barrel three times. Remove the cloth and do normal cleaning (step 1).
    4. Fire two shots and clean
    5. Fire three shots and clean with JB bore cleaner again (Step 3)
    6. Fire three shots and clean
    7. Fire three shots and clean
    8. Fire three shots and clean with JB (Step 3)
    9. Finish with oil soaked patch and then another dry patch.

    That was for a new barrel break in. For a used barrel:

    Step 3 then fire five shots and repeat Step 3
    Clean with JB every 300 rounds or so, or if you see your groups getting worse after a lot of shooting. Use JB very sparingly though.

    It’s impossible to know if all that actually makes a difference on a new gun. The theory is that copper doesn’t build up evenly where the lands start (where the bullet first makes contact with the lands when the rifling engages the bullet). This process removes excess copper and allows it to build up evenly. Over time copper will build up regardless and needs to be removed. Again it’s impossible to know if it actually makes a difference on a new gun, but I used the above advice on a very old gun: 1944 No4 Mk 1* Lee Enfield Long Brach .303 British. That gun shot 3 ½ ” groups at 100yds before using JB and it shot 0.75” groups at 100yds with factory ammo after. That was an extreme case on an old gun that obviously had a ton of copper fouling, but it made me a believer. I’ve used that process to break in all of my new guns since and I’ve had some real tack drivers. I personal believe that process makes a difference, and I know it made a difference on that particular old gun.

    Note: There are a lot of things that can affect the accuracy of a rifle and this cleaning process is not a magic cure all. I used the same process a 1943 No1 MK III* Lee Enfield and it had no affect at all that I could see, but the No1 is a very different animal than a No4. The No1 had other things that also needed to be tuned before I could see any improvement. It now shoots very very well with the tuning and this cleaning process. Most guns have to be individually tuned to get them to shoot their best. For me this cleaning process and break in is the first step in tuning all guns. :)
     
  9. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 27, 2011
  10. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

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    Your post is rife with misinformation, but I'll just tackle this aspect.
    Of course you can. A barrel break-in will reduce copper fouling. Each patch run through during the process is an indicator of whether it is working or not. If you don't see a reduction in the amount of copper on the patches as you go, you are either doing it wrong, or your barrel had already been lapped.
     
  11. Marlinman

    Marlinman New Member

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  12. Muliemaster

    Muliemaster New Member

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    yes he does
     
  13. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    After the *** whuppin' he needs a hard kick to the groin. That is just the wrong way to try to get a laugh. As far as the barrel break-in thing goes, I think this debate will go on forever.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2011
  14. TCH2FLY

    TCH2FLY New Member

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    Explain how cleaning between rounds will reduce longterm fouling.
    It appears you are saying that the copper left during the first few rounds can never be removed unless it is removed immediately after the round is shot. NOTHING during the cleaning process will change the roughness in the bore, PERIOD. Only lapping or shooting will smooth the bore, removing the fouling immediately is a placebo. I will admit that it may be easier to get a clean patch after each round but that doesn't mean you can't completely remove the build up after 40-50 rounds.

    Sent from my iPhone using FirearmsTalk
     
  15. 207driver

    207driver New Member

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    It would take too long to explain the process completely here. I have personally seen the improvement of the Krieder method even on pistol barrels.

    Of course there are those that will argue the usefulness of any of this just because. Also please remember flat earthers abound. :rolleyes:
     
  16. TCH2FLY

    TCH2FLY New Member

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    I wasn't directing the question to you but I am very familiar with the Kreiger method, not sure what you are refering too :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2011
  17. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    The way it was explained to me is that the inside of the barrel will not break-in or smooth out consistently if the rough metal edges are coated with copper fouling. The metal surface has rough edges in places and supposedly needs to be consistently clean to allow bullets making contact with it to smooth it evenly. I don't know if this information is completely accurate; it is just what I was told. I did not use a formal break-in method for my new match grade M1A and I feel good about putting rounds through it and keeping it clean. It keeps shooting pretty good.
     
  18. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    Copper fouling can be removed at anytime with JB Bore cleaner and improve the accuracy of a rifle. That's why I included the part for used barrels, and it's something I highly recommend to all of the Mosin, Mauser, and Endfield fans out there (or any well used rifle). The cleaning with the brush, patch, and solvent between rounds on a new barrel removes some fouling but also debris such as slivers and metal particles that result from the bullet contacting burrs and tool marks during the previous shot. By "debris" I mean very small particles but stuff that you still don't want in your barrel when a new bullet is propelled down the barrel. The JB cleaning removes almost all copper fouling and allows for direct contact between the next bullet and the barrel (especially the start of the lands) rather than the bullet contacting the copper fouling that is there from the previous shots. I have to believe that is a good thing.

    You can wait 50 rounds or a 1000 rounds to clean the fouling? You could also wait 50 or a 1000 rounds before you tighten your scope mounts, but why would you? You could also wait 50 or a 1000 rounds before removing any debris in you barrel, but again why would you?

    This might not be an issue on hand lapped barrels? Those barrels should be free of tool marks and burrs from the manufacturing process? But how many new guns come with hand lapped barrels?

    Now as for why you can never know if it makes a difference. You can take a rifle right of the box, shoot it normally, and it will either shoot good groups or not. You can't know if that break in process would have made a difference because you didn't do it. Similarly, you could go through all of that and it will still either shoot good groups or not. You can't know if it improved your accuracy any because you can't know how it shot without the break in process. It's a catch 22. However, I do know that it made a world of difference on a very used gun.

    I'm also guessing that the man this information came from knows a lot more about accuracy than I could ever hope to. The day I bought my first can of JB to try on that old Enfield I told a local gunsmith (who I bought the JB from) about that article and what I intended to do. He went on to say that Kenny Jarret was over rated and that the whole thing was a bunch of B.S. A couple of hours later I had a 1944 Lee Enfield with factory ammo out shooting every gun at the range. I know for certain that his advice made a difference on that gun, and I truly believe that it made a difference on all my new guns as well. :)
     
  19. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Are those rhetorical questions or should we just get back to you?
     
  20. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    Yes. :D





    Those questions were specifically for TCH2FLY's comment "removing the fouling immediately is a placebo", and it might be? But I think it's important to remove it immediately so that the bullet is contacting the barrel and not fouling, and the normal cleaning is important between shots to remove debris. I hope those rhetorical questions help drive home my point as to why one would clean between shots during the break in rather than not doing it or waiting to do it. Of course all of that is just my .02.