How serious are you about prepping and why?

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by Jimmy, Sep 24, 2011.

  1. Jimmy

    Jimmy New Member

    134
    0
    0
    Just curious how many take their preps serious and what are you generally planning for?

    Jimmy
     
  2. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

    8,411
    3
    0
    I live in Tsunami Central on the Oregon Coast. The active fault is 10 miles off shore, I'll have 15 minutes to load the Jeep and get to higher ground; witch will take 30 minutes.

    My hope is that I have a good enough plan that I can beat the water by a couple of minutes!!

    I have food, shelter, clothes, fuel, propane, dry fire starting materials, lanterns, guns and ammo for that.

    I am planning a shelter at the house for the SHTF societal implosion if it happens. There will be food, heat, sleeping quarters and a small cook stove, some refrigeration, battery array and inverter to run everything and a 20 amp electrical drop from the house. Water is provided by a 200 gallon plastic cistern that is connected to the down spouts from the roof.

    That's it so far!!
     

  3. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    Self sufficiency. I do not prep myself. What I'm counting on in a SHTF situation is trying to make it about 2 hours south of here, and hoping that place is still on the map. If I can make it down the road to the rest of my family, I'll be set-because they DO prep, and are serious about it. We're talking underground shipping containers kind of prep.

    I have BOBs and that's about it. One for me, wife, son, and putting one together for a neighbor who is elderly and disabled, he'll be going with us.
     
  4. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

    19,847
    3
    0
    I am deadly serious. I prepare because life is uncertain, nature is uncertain and man is a destructive animal.
     
  5. bkt

    bkt New Member

    6,964
    0
    0
    What he said.

    For me, it's mostly the "life is uncertain" part. I could lose my job, get hit with some unforeseen expense, etc. and the prepper mentality helps get you through stuff like that.

    Also, the food quality of home-grown stuff tends to be higher and cheaper than store-bought produce. Don't even get me started on the quality of venison over most beef. So even if nothing ever happens, my lifestyle lets me save money and eat better.
     
  6. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

    3,937
    0
    0
    I'll Bite

    I think everyone’s got a different attitude about preps. For me it’s just something I enjoy doing. I don’t think of it as “taking it seriously” or “not taking it seriously”. I enjoy acquiring new skills and becoming more self-sufficient. I also enjoy a connection to and understanding of the past. Many of those “new” skills are only new to me and have actually been around for hundreds if not thousands of years.

    As for “what I’m preparing for”, I’m not really preparing for anything. I have an appreciation for how bad things could become as a result of any number of events. Being more self-sufficient will hopefully make those events easier to weather. Like some have stated on this site, you don’t plan on anything bad happening but you still buy insurance. But I don’t think of being more self-sufficient as preparing for something bad. I think of it as acquiring new skills which are at the very least useful, and could potentially be indispensable. That’s more than you’ll get from a video game or watching T.V.
     
  7. Jimmy

    Jimmy New Member

    134
    0
    0
    Thanks for some great replies so far.

    I was still a young man, working for Standard Oil Of CA, when the Oil embargo hit us in '73. After going thru that, I decided then things would change for me. I would try to be ready for anything that came along. So I've been a prepper of sorts for about 35+ years.

    For the last 12 yrs I've managed to make myself as close as I can to self-sufficient. Growing more than enough food. Very large garden, fruit trees, chickens, turkeys, 2 goats, feeding out wild caught hogs, 2 ponds that I eat out of regular :D. Three sources of water, with one being 2200 gallons. Minor solar and just got my first wind genset. It's just 400 watts at peak but adds to the battery charge....Experimenting with low electric use refrigeration for food as we speak.

    And of course a "tool set" of weapons. I've tried to keep it simple and only 4 calibers/gauges to procure and load for. .22, .40, 12 ga, .308.

    And I'm surrounded by self-sufficient types. We all have each others back. It's nearly like a prepper communitiy.

    Jimmy
     
  8. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

    4,269
    22
    48
    I guess I'm not a prepper. I live in an area where an act of nature causing a SHTF situation is very unlikely. For acts of man, if it is nuclear everyone is screwed anyway. For economic collapse(the most likely) I feel I would have at least a weeks notice(most likely longer) and that would be plenty of time to finish my preps. I do keep a couple weeks of food,water filters,keep all vehicles full of fuel, and of coarse I have guns/ammo. For me this seems like enough prep for my wife and my situation. Just have to stay aware national/world events as they unfold. As troubles appear to get worse then add to your preps as you see fit.
     
  9. IGETEVEN

    IGETEVEN New Member

    8,358
    4
    0
    Spot on. :cool:
     
  10. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

    3,937
    0
    0
    Nice

    Jimmy, it sounds like you're right about where I hope to be. I've got a few years left before I'll be able to buy a nice piece of land in the country. Until then, I'm learning as much as I can and preparing what I can. I'm pretty well set on the basics, and electricity and home design are what I'll be working on over the next couple of years. I'm already becoming more and more fascinated with historical architecture. I'm slowly figuring out how to use that along with modern conveniences like solar panels to create a really nice and sustainable home.

    Hopefully you'll post some of the things you've learned about generating power and conserving it.
     
  11. Jimmy

    Jimmy New Member

    134
    0
    0
    This is the way I've built my out buildings and my small cabin. I built mine with R-21 walls, R-21 floors and R-30 ceilings. Only 768 sf heated and cooled. My solar is only 180 watts, but with the new wind gen adding 400 watts most of the time, it keeps my small bank of 6 volt golf cart batteries. Hoping to add some more solar in the next couple of years. It only runs my lighting, small LCD tv and a small fan. Lighting is 75% LED, working towards 100%.

    PoleHouses.com: construction plans, hurricane and flood resistant housing concepts, ecological living concepts

    Anyway a brief explanation.

    Still learning everyday.

    Jimmy
     
  12. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

    19,847
    3
    0
    Jimmy, you have a lot to offer with your experience. How about doing a thread for us on your buildings and energy sources?
     
  13. Scratchammo

    Scratchammo New Member

    1,490
    0
    0
    I'm always prepping. Ammo, first aid kits, etc. I live packed. Like most people I have a lot of stuff but my saddlebags have all the necessities. I'm set up to leave in a moment's notice.
     
  14. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

    19,847
    3
    0
    FWIW, even though our plan is to remain in place, my BOB is at the door and there's a first aid kit as well as rations and water in the car.
     
  15. widowmaker

    widowmaker New Member

    624
    0
    0
    I never thought about a SHTF happening until recently. If it is an economic collapse then I will stay right where I am. I have land, water and power covered. I also have almost enough ammo stored up but am always shooting and replacing it.
    If it is a natural disaster then I will still stay here unless fire runs me out. If that happens I have a place to go with a good friend.
    EMP scares the bejeeses out of me. Without power in the cities it is going to get real ugly real fast.
    As to how serious I take prepping,::: about as serious as a heart attack.
    Oh by the way, thanks for all the great info and insight from all the people on here.
     
  16. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    It would really suck in an economic collapse if suddenly the gubmint tried to force us all to pay/receive electric service, even you guys that have solar and wind. Sound similar to Obamacare anyone? Don't even try to think it would be impossible, the government unfortunately do whatever they want until we stop them.
     
  17. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

    12,360
    31
    48
    I've been hit by a couple of hurricanes. There is normally no help available for at least the first three days afterwards, but one still has to live and breath.

    Am I prepared? Yes.
     
  18. TacticalPrecision

    TacticalPrecision New Member

    131
    0
    0
    I'm with most of these guys in being prepared..maybe overly so. I have a bug out location already selected in which there is a crate buried that houses a rifle and ammunition for hunting, so I don't need to lug around a bolt action if I'm in a hurry. Inside this kit are also several MREs, Spool of Paracord, Emergency blankets or "space" blankets as some call them, Matches, Flares, filter cartridges for my water filter and numerous other things, mostly supplies for extended stays.

    My bags I have ready to go contain the emergency stuff because you don't know when you're going to need a medkit, and while I have extra stuff in the crate, I may need something on the way there so I want to have everything with me, but then extras of common use items at the site like disinfectant and bandaids and such because without readily available medicines you need to be more careful than most people are now to avoid infections and the like.

    To some it may seem a bit crazy to have already gone out and buried supplies like some kind of insane human squirrel. However! I am a father of 4 and have to consider plans to taking care of them aswell so I can't just pile my Jeep to the brim with crap and be waiting and ready, I have to bring 4 kids along with me..no X wife though she gets left behind. Having hunting and emergency supplies at the location already gives me some freedom in what I need to pack out with me. I can bring my AR instead of a hunting rifle for one, I don't need to bring extra filters for water or a bunch of other things like that. The biggest thing is having ammo already there, I keep some stuff here and ready to go, but having a couple of ammo cans there of 5.56 and some 308 and a can of 7.62x54r for the mosin is a big relief because I don't have to carry it out with me. As the times go on and things change I might add a second crate, I don't know. But It is a nice comforting thought to know I have supplies for..well possibly years of survival. Assuming I don't miss a lot and can one shot stuff I'd say I've easily got enough ammunition to hunt for my family for over 2 years if I break down into the 5.56

    I've thought about adding in some .22 items for smaller game and such plus I can store rediculous amounts of ammo for it in a very small space. but I think i'd need a second crate and I'm not ready to make that kind of commitment..plus when I told my friends about it they look at me like i'm crazy..one of em voted for Obama and he thinks i'm the crazy one.
     
  19. ArizonaLawman

    ArizonaLawman New Member

    463
    0
    0
    I have been seriously preparing for about ten years.

    See...I believe, as the man of the house, and head of the family it is my responsibility to protect my family, and always take care of them. Though I am married to a very strong and capable woman, it is MY job to be the rock. Being a "man" means a whole lot more to me than just the accident of being born with a penis. Men take care of their family, no matter what it takes...PERIOD. I don't mean "man" in the machismo dripping, chest thumping sense either. I mean in the stonng, gentle, caring way that my Grandfather was a man. He was strong, gentle, honest, and ALWAYS took care of us, and taught us by example what a real man was. We ALWAYS knew he'd fight a grizzly bear with his bare hands to protect us, and he always made us feel safe. There are a lot of "males" and "baby daddys" out there, who haven't a clue about what it means to be a man.

    So, with that in mind, I have been seriously preparing for about a decade. I calculate we have enough food for 2500 calories per person for just over two years stored now. Rice, dry beans, canned goods, jerked meat, flour, salt, you name it. I have cases of MRE's and dehydrated food. Every time we go to Sam's or Costco, I buy a few more long-term and bulk items for the basement. Hell, I even have five gallons of Trappey's Red Devil Louisiana Hot Sauce....you might as well be comfortable in a SHTF situation!

    I have a lot of the stuff stored around the property in 55-gallon polymer barrels...so we'd never lose all of it.

    There is solar on my house and pole barn, 2 generators, and an extra propane pig that I NEVER use.

    I have bought one, and built one solar oven. I even experimented in baking bread and cookies in both...and it works. Never underestimante the value of a fresh hot cookie when things are otherwise falling apart around you.

    When we go to Wally World, or ANY gun store...I buy one or two more bricks of .22lr ammo. I am pretty well set in centerfire, and have my Dillons for any cf I may need to re-manufacture. My goal is to have 250k rounds of lr. When I reach that goal (it won't be too long), then I will probably keep on buying it. I believe .22lr will be a currency in a SHTF world. I would NEVER swap centerfire ammo unless it is some of the old Blazer aluminum case 38Spl I have stored. Trade NOTHING reloadable! I even have several pairs of cap & ball revolvers, and three black powder rifles. Not ideal for SD...but think about it....how many years did Hickok, Cody, and the ones who went before them use black powder to deadly effect? If I am out of ammo, powder and primers...I still have the charcoal burners. One of the rifles is a flintlock!

    I have spent a LOT of money over the years, but if you look at how it has been spread out over those years...it has been pretty economically done. A little here and there, with a plan in mind, and BOOM, you're set. But be sure you HAVE A PLAN. If you don't...you won't have what you need when you NEED it now.

    And...even if the world doesn't end, and the zombies don't attack...we can weather out any natural disaster. We don't have floods and hurricanes, or tornadoes here in AZ. Our biggest natural disaster is heat. I have a basement, trees around my house for shade, and along with the central air...I have the old style swamp coolers that work pretty darned well at cooling the house when the humidity is not soaring.

    We have friends who are of the same mindset, and some LDS neighbors, who though I am not of their religious persuasion, we cooperate pretty well, and would continue to do so. One of the advantages to living out in the country is we have space and time to batten down the hatches once the cities fall apart. We will have warning, and by God will be ready to repel boarders.

    Fail to plan, plan to fail. Don't get caught with your weenie in the wind. And do NOT show up and MY house with nothing to offer to make you worth the calories you will consume (unless you're a hot blonde).
     
  20. Jimmy

    Jimmy New Member

    134
    0
    0
    You might be correct, but it would cost the guberment plenty. Some folks, not me, have no other choice for power, than solar. It's miles to their home from the nearest power lines. Would cost 10's of thousands of $$ to build those lines in. I have a friend in WYO that is 27 miles from the nearest power line. They told him when he came up with $90K they'd be happy to help him out. He spent $27K and is fully energy independent.

    Jimmy