How Often......

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by Polygon, Mar 25, 2011.

  1. Polygon

    Polygon New Member

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    Do you cycle out your defensive rounds?
     
  2. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    Never have, but they are only a year old or so, I'd say every couple years, Ive got ammo from 1954 that has never failed to go bang, I wouldn't worry too much.
     

  3. Hollander

    Hollander New Member

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    After each one has been chambered twice. I mark them with a marker and if they have been chambered twice they move to the "shootem up pile". I am one of those who has a little concern from rechambering shells too many times and potentially uping the pressure.
     
  4. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Twice a year. I shoot the old box as I rotate through to make sure I know where the rounds impact.

    It's important to shoot your self defense rounds like you shoot your gun. You have to know how it performs with them in the chamber the same way your gun performs when you draw it from your holster.

    JD
     
  5. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    Most ammo will last long than you or I if stored properly. All the same you should should shoot PD rounds on a regular basis. I run a mag through each time I go to the range to get the feel for the ammo vrs ball ammo. It cost a bit more but in the time of need I want to know that my pistol will eat the ammo I'm feeding it.
     
  6. M14sRock

    M14sRock Active Member

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    I rotate mine out either yearly, when they start to get chewed up, or if the bullet gets pushed in from chambering too many times.

    I still have cans full of old "rotated out" duty ammo and have never had a round misfire.
     
  7. wmille01

    wmille01 New Member

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    I do it about every two or three months, I also clean out my magazines on a regular basis because of all the crap that gets into them.
     
  8. mesinge2

    mesinge2 New Member

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    What he said
     
  9. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I shoot it up and replenish as I go along. I always keep 500 rounds of rifle ammo and 300 rounds of handgun ammo "in stock" for every firearm.
     
  10. Polygon

    Polygon New Member

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    Thanks for the info everyone. Now I just need to go stock up on some 9mm.
     
  11. M14sRock

    M14sRock Active Member

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    Ammoman had 124gr +P Gold Dot for $499 per 1,000, delivered.
     
  12. Lindenwood

    Lindenwood New Member

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    You can also manually put the rounds into the chamber and then you'll never have to worry about it. That's what I've always done.


    For the GF's p22, since ammo is already pretty inexpensive (500 rounds for $50 for what we actually keep loaded in it), we just take the loaded mags to the range and run through them before loading up practice ammo (so, 21 rounds total).

    For centerfire, though, I never really bothered shooting more than was necessary to check function, recoil, POI, etc. With the .44, my handloads are the same weight and velocity of my defensive loads and feel / shoot almost identical, so that isn't a huge deal.
     
  13. dogwalk

    dogwalk New Member

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    Would like to know how chambering ammo several time runs the risk of over preasure? I'm 72 yrs. young and have been reloading, shooting and hunting a good many years and sure hear some tales. The auto pistols I keep here in the house get their mags rotated every month. Dogwalk
     
  14. Lindenwood

    Lindenwood New Member

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    Every now and then, when the nose of the bullet is shoved into the feedramp, it can cause the bullet to seat deeper into the case ever so slightly. The primary factor that would affect this is how firmly the case is crimped around the bullet. Other factors would include the profile of the bullet combined with how aggressive the angle of the feed ramp is.


    One way to check is simply measuring the OAL with a micrometer if you are concerned. As long as it hasn't changed, the round isn't a problem. As I mentioned above, though, simply loading the chambered round by hand, rather than from the magazine, will eliminate the issue altogether.