How much?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by fins59, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. fins59

    fins59 New Member

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    Noob question.
    How much ammo does one have to be shooting before reloading becomes a worthwhile endeavor? I imagine initial expense isn't cheap. And probably isn't a place you wanna cut corners on.
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    you can get everything you need in a basic setup single stage for under 300$. less if you buy used.

    how much you save depends on what cartridge your shooting. for 458 winmag i typically save about 70$ per 20 rounds if im loading 500 grain bullets.

    box of 50 500grain bullets is 39$ to buy 50 loaded rounds it would cost me $200+ so im saving roughly 150$ per 50 once you factor in primer, powder, and occasional case replacement.

    for some rounds like using 350 grain round nose its priceless since loaded ammo in that bullet isnt available.

    savings on the 458socom is in the similar range

    for things like 9mm the savings are smaller but still there.

    it just depends.

    dont forget when your compairing reloading costs dont compare high quality match grade bthp bullets to those cheap @ss tula steel cased russian junk. thats where a lot of people get confused. the whole "i can buy wolf ammo for x ammount" thing being compaired to cranking out match quality handloads isnt a good comparison. kinda like comparing a hand tuned sports car to a nissan leaf...

    one other thing reloading your own is like buying your first mosin 91/30. its ADDICTIVE!!
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2011

  3. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    There's these little Lee classics sets that run about 30 bucks or so, I'm thinking of getting one. They seem to be just for people like me, cheapskates that don't really shoot enough. Do a search on cabela's or midwayusa.

    Like I pointed out, I don't shoot enough to justify a top of the line reloading set up, and only need a set for one caliber. It sounds like you and I may be in the same boat? At least for the moment anyway, I'm sure you'll surpass me on range time, it's not hard to do.

    It's a personal decision really. I do one type of reloading, I make my own smokes. You can't beat 80 cents for a pack of smokes, ammo reloaders generally seem to feel much the same way, and some like to make specialty match ammo.
     
  4. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    It all depends on what you start with.If you buy used reloading equipment,you can get into reloading pretty cheap-$100-200.
    If you buy new,it can get expensive depending on just how much,and what brands you buy.
    Reloading any larger caliber pistol or rifle cartridges,you will see the cost savings and return on your initial investment pretty fast when you compare what it cost you to produce ammo,and what a Premium box of factory ammo cost.
    The main thing you want to do before trying to reload ammo is READ & LEARN about reloading.There are several books that any beginner should buy and read before trying to load.

    http://www.amazon.com/ABCs-Reloading-Bill-Chevalier/dp/0873498518

    I have reloaded for 30+ years and I'm still learning!
     
  5. ANGRYcanary

    ANGRYcanary New Member

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    Whoa you guys covered that quick... Leave some for us...:)
     
  6. fins59

    fins59 New Member

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    Well I've got a ., not horribly expensive to feed but not cheap either. Also looking at a AR15, that seems like it could get kinda expensive to feed (if for no other reason than it's a hungry beast). Then I really want an SKS or an AK. So I see reloading in my future somewhere.
     
  7. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    For plinking ammo,you really won't save too much for the AR,but if you are seeking precision varmint/target loads you can find out the perfect match for your particular rifle.Same goes for ammo for an AK or SKS.

    Full Metal Jacket-FMJ ammo will always be cheaper than a Soft Point/Ballistic Tip/or Partition bullet ammo.But there are a lot of public ranges that do not allow FMJ ammo to be shot there.
     
  8. fins59

    fins59 New Member

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    That was supposed to say" .45acp. "Don't know where it went.
     
  9. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I have been reloading metallic cartridges since the early 80's, shotshells since the 70's. To me it is less about cost savings and more about self sufficiency and self reliance. I don't have to trust someone else's loading. I don't have to trust that a particular caliber is in stock at the local Wallyworld. I don't have to worry about the feds controlling how much ammo I buy. I cast my own bullets from .380 to .45-70 as well as shotgun slugs and buckshot. As long as I have a decent stockpile of primers and powder, I can stay in the game.
     
  10. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    These days I think most people load to develop good custom ammo that shoots well in their guns, not necessarily just to save money. For more than one of my guns I can buy factory ammo cheaper than what it costs me to make my loads. I shoot the factory rounds and keep the brass for loading. I know of a few people who are totally cost driven when it comes to reloading and they tend to cut corners in the process because they are always looking for a cheaper way to do it. They do some things that I consider to be careless and irresponsible. They take chances to save pennies. I can't understand some of these people because they are very willing to spend big bucks on expensive guns then get so cheap about what ammo they shoot. To each his own I guess.
     
  11. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    For me it was what I was shooting, not how much.... I was tired of getting blank stares when I tried to buy ammo... Ever look for 7.7 Jap or .30 US? :p
     
  12. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    Understood. I had this problem once trying to find ammo for the 7.5 Swiss and it has got to be a lot easier to find than what you are looking for. Good luck.
     
  13. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Fins,

    You have heard most of the good answers and the advantage of not only cutting cost and developing ammunition that perfectly matches the weapon it is to be shot out of regarding performance for hunting or precision accuracy. Great responses from Jon, Tex and the others. But I have one other reason for reloading you might want to keep in mind. That is since they have so much problem in their attempt to control our weapons it is possible that in the future they might attempt to put unrealistic tax on ammunition in an all out attempt to control the shooting sport. I have planned ahead and have dies, bullets and powder put back for most of the weapons that I shoot frequently. And as money allows I add to my reserve. Just food for thought that also justifies the need to reload and the cost of setting it up for yourself. In addition to all mentioned the fact of self satisfaction of loading super accurate rounds yourself is a great feeling. And for me it is relaxing to spend time in solitude while loading and thinking out the operations performed.

    03
     
  14. fins59

    fins59 New Member

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    Thanks for all the responses guys.
    Lots of food for thought.
     
  15. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    +1 on that
     
  16. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    another good reason O3. as long as you have bullets, primers and powder, you will always have ammo. also stock up on brass, it's cheaper if bought in bulk.
     
  17. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    It doesn't matter to me if I shoot it 5 times a year or 5 million times a year. I own QUALITY firearms so I only shoot QUALITY reloads in my guns. I wouldn't dream of putting any steel cased ammo or any of that cheap tulammo crap in anything I own.