How much oil?

Discussion in 'Cleaning and Maintenance' started by 12fretter, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. 12fretter

    12fretter New Member

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    I hear conflicting stories. When I took my CCW class, the instructor said to use very little oil. Dry brush the powder off all the pieces you can, oil the slides, wipe it down, done.

    I just received a couple guns from a friend who is a big gun nut and they're drenched in oil.

    I wouldn't want a dripping gun to carry every day.

    So how much oil do you really need?
     
  2. Pasquanel

    Pasquanel Proud to be an American Supporter

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    I personally use very little, if you were going to shoot a thousand or more rounds in one session you might want to run your gun "wet" but for normal use and carry a very light film of your preferred lubricant is more than sufficient. Those of us who cc are more concerned about rust and corrosion rather than actual wear. Realistically any good lubricant will do but should you ask what "do you guys use?" the replies will be almost countless and each will proclaim "their's" is the worlds best! So in answer to the original question if your piece is leaving a stain on your clothing you're using too much! ;)
     

  3. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Just enuff to lub the moving parts- anymore will just run off-
     
  4. shouldazagged

    shouldazagged New Member

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    And it can be worse: I was in an LGS some years ago and a new part-time employee (I'm not even sure he was being paid), middle-aged guy, wanted to show me his carry gun. It was a two-inch .44 Magnum, which in itself made me wonder just a little about his judgment, but it was literally dripping oil. The OWB holster was saturated and staining his pants. I had to wash the oil off my hands after handling the piece. He was proud of how well it was protected, and well lubed so it would be dependable.

    I had to tell the silly schmuck that oiling the chambers was NOT a good idea, and that the lubricant played hell with ammo. And would collect powder residue. And in his case, would just make the gun hard to hold onto with .44 Mag recoil--it was that slippery.

    Come to think of it, I don't think I saw him in the store after that.
     
  5. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    You kant fix stoopid :(
     
  6. MattShlock

    MattShlock New Member

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    I think as little oil as possible is necessary. If you can see it it may be too much.

    I went to Remington teflon oil decades ago. You can buy the spray in automotive stores for 1/3rd less than the gun-labelled oil! It lubricates even after the oil has evaporated, and I've been swithching to silicone lubricant in most recent years. It doesn't dry, doesn't attract dust, and for carry guns and knives nothing gets stained.
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I get my oil for free these days. I begun to scrub my gun down while spraying it with scalding hot water, then completely and totally soak it in oil, I mean DRENCH IT, then I wipe off all excess with a clean rag. Wasteful, but mine's free. And I clean with hot water, so I feel it's necessary to get into every little nook and cranny I can.
     
  8. shouldazagged

    shouldazagged New Member

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    Well, you can, but the fix so often turns out to be fatal. I hope that chump wised up and never had to use that .44 to save his derriere.
     
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    How much does the average handgun need? 2-3 drops.
     
  10. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Use half as much as what you think you need. The excess will just pool up and collect dirt and grime. A gun is not like a machine part or a lathe that needs to be bathed in oil, it just requires a thin coat to prevent rust and reduce friction between moving parts.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2013
  11. eatmydust

    eatmydust New Member

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    Oil metal parts as liberally as you want, and then wipe them clean, so that you can't really see any oil.

    You have still left a film of lube and protectant on the metal.

    The only time I'd recommend a heavier coating of oil is either in a very wet/humid, corrosive environment or for long term storage.
     
  12. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    If I'm not storing the gun for a good bit and know ill have it back out of the safe for shooting in less then a month or so I put a bit of oil in a cloth, wipe down all metal parts and then run a patch through the barrel with a bit of oil on it. If its going in the safe for a longer, I'll go a little heavier on the oil or pull it out and rewipe it every not and again.
     
  13. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Your advice is sound but why pour it on then wipe it off :confused:
    Like the old brylcream (?) commercial--"A little dab will do ya" ;)
     
  14. Dearhunter

    Dearhunter Supporting Member Supporter

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    I was lucky a few years ago, a friend of mine that is a diabetic, gave me a carton of 50 syringes with needles. I fill one with a little gun oil and place the needle right were I want a tad of oil. I use oil where it is needed, but sparingly. Put the cap back over the needle and use it whenever needed.
     
  15. eatmydust

    eatmydust New Member

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    Hey Hoss, if you read back a bit, I said that I was too tight to pour it on like sauce. I was just sayin' that you CAN use as much as you want as long as you wipe it down well!

    Momma didn't raise no fool, atleast not my brothers and sister anyways!!:D

    I guess the "I'm too tight" must have been on another thread.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  16. langenc

    langenc New Member

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    Sounds like you want to prevent rust/corrosion.

    Get some RIG grease and just wipe with a little on a piece of cotton Tshirt. No OIL.

    NO OIL for sure in gun barrels as it all ends up un the stock when guns are stored standing. Ever see the part of a stock near the action that looks all black. That is oil that has drained out of the barrel and into the stock, little bit everytime the gun is cleaned. Twenty yrs, or less, and stock is soaked and there is NO way to get it out.

    I dont store any gun in a soft/hard case. That corrodes em for sure.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2013