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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Gotcha! Thanks for all the info. I shot about 60 or so rounds through the gun should I be worried about it having damaged anything? My dad swears he got them from a LGS but can't remember where. I wonder if they could have been selling reloads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 · (Edited)
Yep, seen that. But in this case this is a badly reloaded .50 cal sabot round definitely not the same intense level of failure and injury you'd likely see in a .223. None the less not gonna be shooting that ammo any more. No more shoe box ammo for me lol!
 

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Gotcha! Thanks for all the info. I shot about 60 or so rounds through the gun should I be worried about it having damaged anything? My dad swears he got them from a LGS but can't remember where. I wonder if they could have been selling reloads.
As long as you cleaned out any crud from the loose primers i wouldnt even worry about it. Maybe check the bolt face make sure it still is smooth and no obvious issues. But really should not have hurt the gun. The LGS could have been selling reloads, but they also may not have known it. They may have been in a Winchester box.
Most of the LGS around here just will not buy any ammo from a private seller for this reason. Well, except this past year that is.
 

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Not Winchester. Federal mil spec 5.56 cases. Looks like reloads. In one of the pics looks like the primer pockets were reamed. Maybe too much... might explain the priners popping.
"LC 14" is Lake City plant made in 2014.
I wonder if someone used improvised tooling to ream the pockets. Looks as though they were reamed to the point of being an outward slight bevel. If this was thought to be WWB and is revealed as LC brass it is quite likely reloads as evident by the look of the primer pocket and the gap around the primer on the unaired round. The case looks as though it may have been sized while still dirty because their are faint lines still visible even with the heavy tarnish/ corrosion. My guess is somebody was turning out ammo as quickly as possible without much regard for quality. If this is in fact what was happening, I suspect powder charges might be less than stellar as well. It would be interesting to pull a few bullets and compare powder charges…
 

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I wonder if someone used improvised tooling to ream the pockets. Looks as though they were reamed to the point of being an outward slight bevel. If this was thought to be WWB and is revealed as LC brass it is quite likely reloads as evident by the look of the primer pocket and the gap around the primer on the unaired round. The case looks as though it may have been sized while still dirty because their are faint lines still visible even with the heavy tarnish/ corrosion. My guess is somebody was turning out ammo as quickly as possible without much regard for quality. If this is in fact what was happening, I suspect powder charges might be less than stellar as well. It would be interesting to pull a few bullets and compare powder charges…
Yeah, you are spot on. I pick up a lot of 5.56 cases that have been handloaded. A lot of people remove the primer crimp with a chamfer/deburr tool and get a little over zealous with it. I can usually spot them when i pick them up and just toss them.
 

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Yeah, you are spot on. I pick up a lot of 5.56 cases that have been handloaded. A lot of people remove the primer crimp with a chamfer/deburr tool and get a little over zealous with it. I can usually spot them when i pick them up and just toss them.
Yes, I do likewise.
 

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Yes
Thanks for the Pictures!
Looking at the pictures, you have a mixture of Lake City Factory Loaded rounds and Reloaded Rounds.
All Lake City Military Ammunition has "Crimped Primers" Like your last Picture. and the picture Cliff shows. For example Picture 1-4 have had the Primer Pockets Swaged Out. Otherwise removing all the metal that was there when new. If you look at your last picture it still has the LC Factory Crimped Primer Pocket I would not shoot anything else than those since I stated have an assortment. The ones without the Crimp I would absolutely not fire. Bottom line you could easily have what in the industry we call a Catastrophic Event! Commonly known as a Blow Up. As far as the rounds that you show that have tarnish on them I see nothing dangerous with those if they are Factory Lake City Rounds, since the ones shown are not to the point of issues of case integrity.
What I did if anyone wants to do it I copied a pasted each Picture onto my Picture File on my Laptop. Which allowed me to blow the Pictures up to see closer details. In fact the one case seems to show signs of excessive pressure.
But on 1-4 you can easily see the Crimp had previously been removed on those and a couple of them were the ones the Primer was blown out of. Which could also have been also caused by over pressure reloads?

03
 

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Your rifle should not have suffered any damage. If it still functions OK you are fine!
They are pretty resilient to abuse! These are two that I personally saw!
Unless you have a Bore Obstruction! :p
Tool Font Bicycle part Hand tool Auto part

Or Bad Reloads!
Air gun Tool Trigger Gun accessory Nickel


03
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
47
Yes
Thanks for the Pictures!
Looking at the pictures, you have a mixture of Lake City Factory Loaded rounds and Reloaded Rounds.
All Lake City Military Ammunition has "Crimped Primers" Like your last Picture. and the picture Cliff shows. For example Picture 1-4 have had the Primer Pockets Swaged Out. Otherwise removing all the metal that was there when new. If you look at your last picture it still has the LC Factory Crimped Primer Pocket I would not shoot anything else than those since I stated have an assortment. The ones without the Crimp I would absolutely not fire. Bottom line you could easily have what in the industry we call a Catastrophic Event! Commonly known as a Blow Up. As far as the rounds that you show that have tarnish on them I see nothing dangerous with those if they are Factory Lake City Rounds, since the ones shown are not to the point of issues of case integrity.
What I did if anyone wants to do it I copied a pasted each Picture onto my Picture File on my Laptop. Which allowed me to blow the Pictures up to see closer details. In fact the one case seems to show signs of excessive pressure.
But on 1-4 you can easily see the Crimp had previously been removed on those and a couple of them were the ones the Primer was blown out of. Which could also have been also caused by over pressure reloads?

03
So to clarify. The one with the blown primer has the factory crimp but the one thst is unfired shows no factory crimp? Also what could cause the excessive pressure ?
 

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NO the ones with the Blown Primers are the Reloads and someone took a tool that can be purchased and Removed the LC Primer Crimp Ledge! In your Pictures 2-3 &4. So they could remove the fired Primers and put new Primers in the Case for reloading. If you will notice they do not have the LC Crimping Ledge remaining on the base of the Cases.

And the ones that look like these two in the below pictures are the
Good Ones that are OK!
Notice the extra Crimp Ledge next to the Primer. The Crimp Ledge has Red Sealer on it which is required by the Military and in the bottom picture that you can see very well. Hope that makes it more clearer to you. If not just let us know!
Wood Household hardware Font Metal Copper

GOOD ROUND!
Human body Material property Button Circle Natural material

GOOD ROUND

As far as your question about what could cause excessive pressure three reasons come to mind.
#1 Your Rifle is New so Headspace should be correct if it was checked by the factory. So very rarely does that happen.
#2 The once fired Cases that were reloaded had stretched after being fired the first time and the person reloading them did not check them for "Over All Length of the Case" Which if stretched, would need trimmed to the correct OAL specifications and did simply reloaded them.
#3 Improper powder load above that specified in a Reloading Manual or the wrong Powder!

03
 
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