How long can I store rimfires in a mag?

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by hitrecordjoe, Apr 30, 2014.

  1. hitrecordjoe

    hitrecordjoe New Member

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    these mags have some tension and im trying to break them in how long can i leave rimfire bullets in them, it seems that the tension could one day dent the primer
     
  2. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Forever. Or a long long long time.
     

  3. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    If you mean box (pistol) mag, no limit, except the spring may get tired some day. Tubular mag - don't know, never tried.
     
  4. Missouribound

    Missouribound Well-Known Member

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    You want the tension. Tension is good.:D
     
  5. robertusa123

    robertusa123 New Member

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    Modern gun. No limit. If your worreyed about the spring. Don't load it all the way.... or you can do what I did. Get a relover
     
  6. deg

    deg Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I think you already ruined them. I have an ammo disposal bin... better send them to me quickly!! ;)
     
  7. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Springs wear out from repetitive compression and expansion. We call this "use". They do not wear out from remaining compressed or expanded.

    Their is no risk of mag spring igniting a primer.
     
  8. Franklin1995

    Franklin1995 New Member

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    I don't think you're correct. I've read in multiple places that it's good to downstack a magazine by 2 rounds, that way the spring isn't full compressed all of the time. If you have a spring that is fully compressed all of the time, it will wear out.
     
  9. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    This has been gone over a hundred times. Many many coil springs (same as most mag springs) are under max tension in your guns all the time. If your gun is hammerless then it has the mainspring under full tension all the time (ok a few exceptions). On many guns they are under tension from the day they are manufactured until forever. Tube mags also use coil springs so leave 'em loaded if you want.
    To the OP the mag spring will never ever make the ammo 'go off'.
     
  10. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    That's because the internet is full of "gun experts" and to many people pop off trying to sound smart while lacking any engineering or relevant experience.

    ...and even more folks simply need non issues to worry about.

    I personally fired mags that been left loaded for years without any problems.

    Inherited a loaded .45 ACP MAG that I know had been loaded for 12 years, it fired flawlessly.

    Skip the you tube commandos and look up spring degradation info. Google is your friend. ;)

    Tack
     
  11. flybuddy

    flybuddy New Member

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    Is a relover when you get involved with your ex-wife?:)--guess that's only if you get "loaded" all the way.
     
  12. robertusa123

    robertusa123 New Member

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    Damyou autocorrect.......... p.s. one and only one wife pulse 3 kids
     
  13. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Leaving a few shells out of the magazine is not an internet rumor. Vietnam vets came home by the thousands telling people not to fill their magazines all the way and leave the magazine under full tension. At one point the M16 magazine would not function properly if left under full compression for an extended period of time.

    Todays magazines degrade too. Our magazines in better guns have a very tight spring. Some people never manage to fil a Glock magazine. But if you get the magazine full, just leave it alone for a few weeks. After a few weeks the magazine breaks in or degrades.

    To the OP you don't have to worry about your magazines. The wax type lubricant used 22 LR ammo will dry out long before the magazine spring degrades.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2014
  14. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    This subject has always bothered me, mainly because all of the answers seemed too simplistic. One manufacturer makes springs "softer" so they are easier to use, but then they have to be replaced more often. Another makes springs "stiff" so they last longer, but you can break your fingers loading it. So I went looking for answers. Here's what I found:

    To which there was this response:

    This accurately addressed the points that I had been ruminating about and answered a few that I hadn't thought about yet. As with any product, design, materials, treatments and type of use makes a difference. This also brought up the fact that design of the magazine itself and its follower also play a part. I have had magazines that had a long "stopper" under the follower and the magazine was a bit longer, making more room to store the compressed spring. These magazines didn't allow one extra round and lasted forever, either stored or used. I have had magazines in which one could stuff three extra rounds and there was no stopper, causing maximum spring compression which caused occasional failures. Counting rounds and stopping at the stated capacity left the appropriate space that allowed the spring to function properly.

    As usual, there are more factors at play that must be considered. For your carry gun, the one on which you bet your LIFE, it would seem to be smart to spend a little extra on quality springs which work consistent to the way you wish to use them, or constantly monitor the provided springs to make sure you aren't over-stressing them. In this day and age of advanced heat treating, metallurgy, and CNC machining, it would seem irresponsible for a manufacturer to provide springs that would fail were a magazine loaded to stated capacity. A call to the manufacturer might further shed light on how the provided springs should be used. If they are not designed for your use, a quality replacement might be in order.

    Springs in modern day magazines should be designed quite differently than those from the Vietnam War or World War II eras. It isn't fair to apply old concepts to newly-designed equipment and vice-versa. Make your own tests and evaluations and avoid passing on old wive's tales that may no longer be true.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2014
  15. robertusa123

    robertusa123 New Member

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    Its all about cost. It cost more money to put in spring made from high quality steel. Vs cheep springs. That 95% of fire arms owners will not where out. You can all ways find high quality after market parts for most guns. And up grade it your self
     
  16. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    The basic design of the semi auto magazine hasn't changed in 100 years. Metals suffered from fatigue in 1911 and they still wear out today. If you think magazine springs last forever you run them in your gun. Don't try to get the rest of the world confused. After all we are talking about a part that costs less than $10. Magazine springs should be changed when they are noticeably softer than a new spring.

    My brother is a very good mechanic. He was convinced that you can't wear out the magazine spring on a pump shotgun. He left his eight shot Maverick 88 loaded with nine shells in it for years. Luckily he was just target shooting when he discovered that the magazine spring in his maverick 88 would only push some of the shells out of the magazine. He replaced the magazine spring and the Maverick 88 shoots nine 2 3/4" shells just as fast as one can pump it.
     
  17. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Well... I don't claim to be an expert but I've been shooting for a the better part of 3 decades to include 6 years of infantry service using issue mags that were god know how old.

    Fired several calibers out of fully loaded mags that had been loaded for extended periods of time... IE years... The longest being a colt 8 round .45 ACP that I had personally loaded 12 year earlier.

    No hick ups so personally, I think it's an urban legend.

    Tack

     
  18. Pasquanel

    Pasquanel Proud to be an American Supporter

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    I have a High Standard Field King pistol with two 10 round mags that have been loaded continuously for over 50 years and work flawlessly.
     
  19. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla Active Member

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    All the Vietnam Vets gave the same advice, never fully load your mag which grew into the urban legend of leaving your mag one round shy. I am not an engineer and at this point, I am not sure who to believe.

    I keep my gun loaded and the mag one shy. (JIC)
     
  20. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    I can just see this huge, buried, AR500 reinforced box in your backyard full of bad ammo...