How is exit pupil determined?

Discussion in 'Optics & Mounts' started by locutus, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The pupil of the human eye can dilate to 7mm. If the exit pupil of the scope is 7MM, your eye can use all of the light transmitted. If the exit pupil is less than 7MM, the scope is not illuminating the eye to the full extent.

    A 7MM exit pupil is the holy grail.

    Exit pupil is calculated by dividing the diameter of the objective bell (front lens) by the magnification Thus a 4x28 scope has a 7MM exit pupil. The same for a 6X42.

    A 3-9X42 will only achieve 7MM at 6 power.

    Some big variables have 56MM bells. This gives a 7MM exit pupil all the way to 8 power.

    On a sunny day, this isn't very important, but in low light situations, the larger the objective bell, the better you will see the target.

    This is only one of several considerations when choosing a scope. But it cam be a very important one.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013
  2. treehugger49

    treehugger49 New Member

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    I remember reading that as one ages, their maximum exit pupil becomes smaller, approximating less than 5 by the time one is 50.

    Therefore, seeking to achieve an exit pupil of ones optic above that number would gain nothing for that particular individual. In other words, going to a larger objective diameter for a given magnification might actually be a waste of money and space, more weight, etc.

    BTW, I think you meant the exit pupil is calculated by dividing the diameter of the objective lens by the magnification.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013

  3. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    OOOOPPS! you're absolutely correct! Pulled my head out of my *** and went back and fixed it! Thanks for the heads up!:D