How do you do that?

Discussion in 'Competition Shooting' started by B4Sunrise, Mar 12, 2012.

  1. B4Sunrise

    B4Sunrise New Member

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    My questions is how exactly does someone get a 1" group at 100 yds? I have a browning X-bolt in 7mm mag, a 4.5x14-44 Zeiss Scope and in general at the range I am able to get 100 yd groups at 3" if I really concentrate, but it is very easy to let a shot go astray. My best technique is to use sandbags to support my forearm, hold the rifle tight against my shoulder and squeeze the trigger with the tip of my finger. At 100yds it is very difficult for me to say that I am even aiming at a point within a 1/2" radius each time, so it seems to me without some device that actually holds the aim true for each shot, it would nearly physically impossible to place 3 shots within a 1" diameter.
    So I'm just wondering, I see a lost of posts from guys claiming sub moa groups, especially with a rifle like a 7mm mag or larger are they using some sort of aid?
     
  2. dks7895

    dks7895 New Member

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    I sighted my 308 in using a Caldwell Lead Sled. Holds the rifle very steady and absorbs a lot of recoil. I can shoot sub MOA at 100y using this setup. In the field, this rifle is crazy accurate. Your 7mag should do much better than 3" at 100y. Lots of variables come into play. Could be the gun, ammo, or shooter.
     

  3. Snakedriver

    Snakedriver New Member

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    7mm Rem. Mag's. excel at long ranges like 400, 500 and even 600 yards. It's a very flat shooting round. At close ranges like 100 yards, my old Savage 116 with the factory Burris 3-9X40 scope on it, off of a Harris Bipod prints little cloverleaf shaped groups all touching each other using 160 grain bullets. I don't really have to do anything special, the gun does it all. I will say that the Savage has a crisp 3 lb. trigger pull that breaks like glass with no overtravel. I didn't do anything to it, it just came that way. I will agree with you, it has a healthy recoil on it, but it is amazingly accuarate despite that. Even at 200 yards, it is around 1" in its grouping. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2012
  4. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    practice practice practice is what I say . However you might try different ammo also , different weights and different manufacturers all shoot differently
    I shoot sub 1" @ 100yd groups with my savage .223 with cheapo remington UMCs.
    Set up a video camera while your shooting and make sure your not flinching , or pulling the trigger instead of squeezing . 7mm has alot of kick and some tend to tense up on the squeeze . Control your breathing . I dont squeeze the trigger until Im calm and my heart rate is low , I try to shoot at the end of my exhale and in between heartbeats but I dont always accomplish that , its tough to do that without alot of practice, and I try to practice it with a snap cap in dry firing on the bipod in my garage on my shooting table . I dont know if you can see it or not with a 14X but at 24X you can see your heart beat making the scope move .
    Buy a couple snap caps and practice alot
     
  5. dks7895

    dks7895 New Member

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    Like others stated....practice and practice some more. Try a 22lr at 50y to sharpen your skills. Easier on the shoulder and the wallet.
     
  6. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Most rifles are not capable of 1" groups at 100 yards. Look at rifles tests many shoot larger than 1" and that is with VERY experienced shooters. Yes many rifles can shoot good but many can not. Also shooting small groups often means a lot of practice. Don't blame the gun until you have an experienced shooter try it first. Some guns are particular about what ammo they shoot. So try different ammo. Scopes/mounts can cause larger groups. There are many many variables in precision shooting. Shooter, ammo, gun, sights, and range conditions play a role in putting the hole in the right place.
     
  7. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Here are some things to try:

    Different ammunition to determine if there is something your rifle ‘likes’ better.
    If so, it’s the ammo.

    Different shooter to determine if there is someone your rifle ‘likes’ better.
    If so, it’s you.

    Different rifle to determine if there is another rifle you like better.
    If so, it’s the rifle.
     
  8. fireguy

    fireguy New Member

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    One thing stands out on what you said about aiming.
    Quote: At 100yds it is very difficult for me to say that I am even aiming at a point within a 1/2" radius each time

    With the magnification you have available on your scope you should be able to pick out any particular spot on the target you want. Make sure you shoot to that spot for each shot. You may be changint point of aim to bullet hole from a previous shot and shooting at the point of impact as opposed to the point of aim you are trying to achieve.

    If shooting from a rest you should achieve at least close to 1 moa. 1.5 isn't bad, but a 3" group is pretty large if you are aiming and firing correctly.

    Make sure the stock is on the front rest you are using. Do not rest the barrel on anything. use your firing hand to only keep the cheek weld where you want it and to press the trigger. Use your off side hand to keep the rifle against your shoulder and to make elevation and windage movements to get the reticle on target. Breathe normally, and exhale slowly when making the shot. Only take the shot when you have the reticle exactly where you want it. You cannot make adjustments or assumptions as to problems unless you are doing that. Good luck.
     
  9. jamesb

    jamesb New Member

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    Practice...I just shot a 5 shot .308 group at 100 yards that is probably around a .8". I haven't measured with a caliper. First time out with any bolt gun I shot a .684" 5 shot group with my previous Remington in .223.

    I've only shot a bolt action 4 times in my life so i'm still new to this. I find any little bit of anticpation, breathing, etc. can really throw the shot off.

    I shot these groups off the bench with the bipod extended, no bags or rests.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2012
  10. B4Sunrise

    B4Sunrise New Member

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    First of all thanks for the feedback, I would say that the biggest factor is most likely the shooter in my case. I say that because at 50 yds I am easily able to get 1" group, so you'd think if I were consistent I would be able to get 2" at 100. I am now planning to buy a another rifle such as a 22 to simply practice shooting, as somewhere between 30 and 40 rounds with the 7mm RM, I generally have had enough. I have tried a few different types of ammo, it seems that Hornady boat tails shoot the best, either 154 gr or 162 gr - BTs.

    I go to the range about once a month, so I'll update the post and let you know.
     
  11. 7mmstw

    7mmstw New Member

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    image-1395761662.jpg

    300 win mag group, it just takes lots of practice and a good rifle platform
     
  12. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

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    buy yourself a .22 and let the 7mm set for now after about a 1000 rds of .22 practising not just blazing away(call your shots) try the big gun and check the easy stuff what kind of sights?hate to sound like a smart azz but you did not say if your scoped or iron sights need glasses?
     
  13. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

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    yes you did sorry go with the .22 and let someone else look over your setup just cause it just came from basspro ect dont mean its right
     
  14. Durangokid

    Durangokid New Member

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    Make sure you time your shots. Keep the barrel temperture down. A hot barrel will often cause flyers.:)
     
  15. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    get comfortable also , I find that I shoot better prone " laying on my belly " w/ bipod than shooting off of a bench with a bipod , dont ask me why thats just how I shoot better and its comfortable for me . If your shooting off of a bench make sure your seat isnt too high or too low . I find my steadiest position prone , toes out , on elbows , left arm under stock resting on my right bicep. Different strokes for different folks though
     
  16. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Get a book on proper shooting technique. There might be some good videos on Utube. Breathing and trigger control are critical.
     
  17. Bidah

    Bidah New Member

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    I have a .22 setup like my high power rifle., and shoot 4x the rounds through it. .22lr is a great practice medium, cuts costs, and lots of walking too. :)
     
  18. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

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    Sounds to me that it is a combination of bad technique and too much rifle for you to learn from.

    The best way to learn is having a good teacher teach you. When i had no one to teach me, I watched videos on YouTube.

    This guy knows what he is talking about.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNoq5KMnZXE"]Holland Long Range Shooting School-The Prone Position[/ame]

    Watch all the videos of his that you can, then try to imitate it.
     
  19. Longrange

    Longrange New Member

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    I use my .22lr (Savage) with a cheap Bushnell to train for long range shooting. It will shoot 1/2" groups at 100 yards all day with good wind and me doing what I need to do. Proper breathing technique and trigger pull are essential. I agree with you getting a .22lr to learn the fundamentals. Mine is zeroed at 100 yards and is a great practice tool. All of the techniques you learn on the .22 will transfer to any other rifle, it will cost less to learn too.
     
  20. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Sunrise, the 7mm Mag, in a bolt action, from a benchrest, is going to have a LOT of recoil. Frankly, you may be dreading that firing pin dropping, and flinching.

    Have someone coach you- load your rifle with an empty mixed in with live amm at random spacing. If you flinch it will be apparent when the empty CLICKS and you jerk.

    A good recoil pad will help. Also try something that does not cause PAIN when it goes bang. I shoot a moderate amount of heavy rifles- but use a Lead Sled when zeroing a scope from the bench.