How Deadly are Firearms.

Discussion in 'Legal and Activism' started by Shade, Oct 15, 2011.

  1. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    I was just wondering how many people are kill by firearms in the US
    every year. The rate for 2007, is 10.2 per every 100,000 people.
    This is all death, suicide, murder, accidental discharge, etc.

    So what then is the death rate for Motor Vehicles? 14.4 so maybe we
    should out law cars and keep guns...

    BTW the death rate for all causes is 760 per 100,000.
    Cancer death rate is 178 per 100,000

    References

    Firearms Death Rate per 100,000 - Kaiser State Health Facts

    Motor Vehicle Death Rate per 100,000 - Kaiser State Health Facts
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2011
  2. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Far as I can tell a firearm has never killed nor injured anyone. Now the person pulling the trigger is another matter...:rolleyes:

    On a serious note, be careful with the stats on firearms. Unlike a vehicle, a gun can be used for defense, for hunting, and to commit a crime. Anti-gunners like to combine all the stats together and publish "facts" that support their positions. In their eyes, a self defense shoot, an accidental shooting and a murder are all equal.
     

  3. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There was a study that found you are 9 times more likely to be killed by a doctor than a firearm.
     
  4. vincent

    vincent New Member

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    I'm too technologically challenged to post the actual links...

    Gunfacts.com...free download, lots of good...VERIFIED stats

    Justfacts.com/gun control, more good reading
     
  5. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Make no mistake. Firearms are deadly.

    Unlike automobiles, or the practice of medicine, firearms are designed to be "deadly". You see, on this forum, daily questions related to which firearm/ammo is the most lethal, usually with the questioner searching for the most "deadly" firearm/ammo combination for his or her use.

    The ability to destroy life, of either animals or humans, is the primary reason for the existance of firearms. Certainly they are also used by dedicated target shooters with non-lethal intent, but they can still become deadly if improperly used. Three situations come to mind that demonstrate the
    usual ways in which firearms are "deadly".


    1. Agressive or evil intent
    2. Self protection from evil intent
    3. Negligence or ignorance

    Of the three, responsible gun owners strive to make sure their firearms are only deadly for number two above. While there are still people that will not believe that use of lethal force is warranted for the protection of the life of the potential victim, those folks are in the minority. Most people are reasonably rational. (politicans excepted)

    Evil intent is not the intention of a great majority of gun owners, though there is a significant number of the other type to paint us all with the "evil" brush. It is easy for "non-gun" people to associate all gun owners with the "evil or nutty" element; that is why we see the anti-gun laws on the books.

    Self protection is accepted by most of society as a reasonable extention to the concept of the "right to life, liberty and the persuit of happiness", although non-gun people would like to see us protect ourselfs with "kinder and gentler" non-leathal methods. Many times that attitude changes when a non-gun person's friends, family, or self becomes a victim of violence.

    Negligence is in some ways is as bad, or worse than evil intent, as it is 100% preventable. Anyone who takes posession of a firearm should have enough respect for the "deadliness" of the tool to learn, understand and follow the nesessary safety precautions to prevent negligent/accidental injuries to people or property. There is no excuse, ever, for the negligent/accidental discharges to cause of injury to people or property. Every time some ignorant person "accidently" shoots someone, it is fuel for the fire of the antis.

    There was a case, at the university that I work at, last fall, where a young man, who had been drinking all day, was showing off his AR to his girlfriend, when he "accidently" shot her in the chest, in his frat room, where she proceeded to die in her twin sister's arms. The young man was: 1. Handling the firearm while intoxicated, 2. He did not unload or clear the chamber, 3. He pointed it at her chest, and 4. He put his finger on the trigger. Crap like that is what we should all, as gun owners strive to prevent. When you see your fellow gunowners being unsafe, call them out on it and do it every time.

    Reducing negligent deaths and injuries is one of the things we can and should do. When we do, it reduces the heat on the lawmakers to pass laws to "protect" the population.
     
  6. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    I went to a "new" doctor about 10 years ago and the new patient question form had 1 question I took exception too. It asked "do you have firearms in your home".

    I left it blank and the DR actually had the balls to ask me why I did not answer that question.

    I responded with JTJ's reference above about how I was more likely to be killed by the DR than a gun, walked out of the appointment, stopped payment from my insurance carrier and documented the whole incident in a letter to the organization.

    I don't know if that organization "Kaizer" droped that particular question but I've not seen it again on anyone's forms since.

    TACK
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    @tack, there are actually some pediatrician's who are refusing service to children whose parents own guns.

    Just another scheme to disarm the public. I'll see if I can find some references again, and post some links.

    Yeah, it's enough to piss me off, and I would have done the same thing, have done the same thing although for different reasons.
     
  8. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The usual reason Doctors want to know if there is a firearm in the home is so he will know how to treat folks with potential mental illness; it might make a difference in the way he treated someone who was depressed or might become suicidal. The other reason is to try to educate those who have firearms and children as to the need to protect one from the other. Judging by the number of kids who die by accidential/negligent wounds in the home, some folks never got the word. I just don't believe in some conspiricy by doctors to disarm the public, under the radar.

    You do not have to tell the doctor anything you don't want to. I just don't understand folks who don't mind posting on the internet about their firearm ownership, for the whole world to see, but are uncomfortable with their Doctor knowing. If I didn't trust my doctor, I would just find another doctor, and not get all excited about it. I don't/didn't select my doctor, nor my children's doctors based on their politics. There are some damn good doctors who are liberal as hell.

    As it happens my family doctor and I have bought, sold and traded firearms over the last 35 years.
     
  9. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you have a doctor that anti gun, do not let him know you own firearms or find a doctor that is not anti gun. All he has to do is send in a form that states you as mentally unstable and you no longer have any gun rights. You will lose your ccw and may have your firearms confiscated.
    I went into the ER about 5 months ago and they asked me if I felt like harming anyone. If I had said yes I would have been turned into the government as unstable.
     
  10. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    For me, my healthcare is taken care of by the VA. For my wife and son, She was asked once (not at a doctor's office, but some kind of public survey) if she owns a gun. She answered honestly "no", and she doesn't, all guns in the house (a whopping total of 2) belong to me.

    Our doctors around here are not quite so anti gun, and if they were, she would answer the questions the same way. If the question were "in the house?" she'd either lie or walk out.

    Personally I see nothing wrong with lying to protect yourself from persecution.
     
  11. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    And the number I used was all combined deaths involving a fire, I would
    guess that 10.1 are due to murders...

    But I could not find what I would have considered good numbers on murders
    vs suicides vs. defensive shooting vs. accidental shooting.

    You chancing of be killed in a car crash are ~50% higher than being killed by
    someone shooting you.

    So we better outlaw cars and trucks.

    I wish I had the money in guns my Dentist spends on guns.
     
  12. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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  13. jebsca

    jebsca New Member

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    With stats like that, makes me glad I'm not working in DC anymore.
     
  14. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    that isnt why doctors put that on the form. its put there at the recomendation of the ama in an attempt to remove gun ownership. they collect this data then use it in propaganda.

    more kids drown in the home in sinks toilets and bathtubs than are injured by firearms in the home. you dont see a question on any form asking if you own a toilet bathtub or sink...

    children that are taught at an early age what firearms are and basic gun safety are not going to hurt themselves or others with a firearm. those children for whom firearms are kept under lock and key and never learn of them are the ones that get hurt.

    gun injuries of children spiked drastically with the advent of gunlocks and the ridiculous idea children shouldnt be exposed to guns.
     
  15. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member

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    your chances of being killed in a car crash are 68 times (several hundred %) greater than being killed by someone shooting you.

    2007 motor vehicle deaths 42,000

    2007 accidental deaths 600
     
  16. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    My adverse reaction was not due to any concern about a Doctor knowing I own guns. I was the combination of this question landing between questions like, "have you ever suffered from a mental illness", and, "have you ever used illicit drugs, and, "how many sexual partners have you had".

    It was very clear by both the questionaire and the attitude that THIS office saw gun ownership as a dangerous vice.

    I've neither the time nor patience to explain myself to people who look down there noses at my heritage.

    TACK.
     
  17. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Guns are deadly in the wrong hands, but be safely used in the hands of a resposible gun owner. They have started wars, and ended them. Innocent people have been killed by bad guys with them, and bad guys have been killed by innocent people with them.
    There are very few gun related deaths in America. Especially when compared to other causes of deaths.
    As for the Dr. knowing, that is none of his business. He may have a right to ask, but I have a right to not tell him. Luckily, I live in a very conservative area so most of the Dr. offices have hunting/gun magazines in the waiting room. :D One family doctor not too far from here is a big fan of ducks unlimited so he has an awesome waiting room full of posters, mags, and I think he had a few mounts too. :D
     
  18. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    Sweet! where did you find that number? the 600?