Hot water heaters

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by 12fretter, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. 12fretter

    12fretter New Member

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    Are tankless heaters worth the hype? My original tank unit is going after 8 years. I really don't want to spend any more than I have to unless it is really compelling to buy a tankless. Opinions anyone?
     
  2. UrbanNinja

    UrbanNinja New Member

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    I have one, love it. Never ending hot water. Your shower experience will never be the same. :D
     

  3. neilage66

    neilage66 New Member

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    Why does hot water need heating? ;)







    Apologies...couldn't resist. :D
     
  4. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    In the long run tankless are supposed to pay for themselves. They have been around a long time but have not caught on. I have never seen a tankless in a commercial building. Tanks have the benefit of giving you that many gallons of potable water if your power/water supply ever conks out.
     
  5. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    How much more are they from the normal ones?
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Electric Tankless- will take additional electrical service beyond what an ordinary electric water heater uses- typical 40 amps at 220v. Natural gas/ propane you need venting (stack) Check the delivered amounts of water, and the temperature rise. Some are good for a shower, but play hell filling a tub. Advantage- they only use energy when you are using hot water. Also check if you are on a well to see life expectancy with well water (hardness)
     
  7. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    Water hardness is a problem for tankless heaters. Scale builds up inside and limits the life of the unit. Have your water tested for hardness.

    They are worth all the hype depending on your water hardness. And maybe even then.
     
  8. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Couldn't one cycle the water through a water softener before running it through the 'on demand' water heaters? My sister has an 'on demand' water heater and she LOVES it. She is on septic and well but I believe she runs the water through a softener, first.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2012
  9. fmj

    fmj New Member

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    Havent heard a lot of good on the longevity or maintenance/reliability side of this equation.
     
  10. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member

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    Looked at it several times. Lot of you get what you pay for with tankless water heaters. They are unlimited within the output capacity, i.e. cheapest one will provide for one tap at a time.

    They avoid storage costs and wasteful reheating
    generally more expensive to install
    those with teenage daughters may want to reconsider ;) Mine judged herself clean when the tank ran out of hot water.

    If I were replacing my tank tomorrow, I'd take another really hard look at one.
     
  11. 12fretter

    12fretter New Member

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    I actually have a water softener on city water so that would not be a problem. I'm replacing a gas unit with another gas unit so all the right hookups are there. I'm just having a hard time spending long term money on a house I don't want to live in. If I could calculate how much savings I could get over say 5 years I might give it some more serious thought.
     
  12. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Check to see if there are any rebates or tax breaks. Some power companies are giving energy rebates.
     
  13. roscoguy

    roscoguy New Member

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    ^^^ All of that. Plus, with an electric unit you may get flickering lights when all heaters are 'firing'. If using one in an area with hard water, the scale buildup can also break loose from the heater, travel through your plumbing & plug up nearly everything.

    I'd also ask the manufacturer specifically about using one with a softener. They may not like salty water any more than hard water...
     
  14. BullseyePrecision

    BullseyePrecision New Member

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    I doubt you would get flickering lights unless said lights are on same circuit as water heater which they shouldnt be.
     
  15. roscoguy

    roscoguy New Member

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    I guess this is a moot point now that I see that the OP is interested in a gas-fired unit, but there were no lights or anything else on the same circuit. The water heater had it's own 125 amp breaker & the lights definitely flickered.

    I use a propane-fired, tankless water heater to heat my workshop via in-floor, radiant heat. It works great & has been 100% reliable for over 5 years. It is a closed loop system using boiler antifreeze, so water hardness is not an issue though.
     
  16. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    From what I understand, the gas units put off a LOT of heat. They require double wall vent pipe and all kinds of fire code stuff. Retro fit is costly because of the huge expense of the proper vent pipe. Installation can easily double the cost. If your existing heater is on an outside wall, it may be worth it as the vent pipe will not be too bad.
     
  17. BullseyePrecision

    BullseyePrecision New Member

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    I dont think it had a 125 amp breaker lol. And there may be something wrong with it if it pulls enough current on start up to make the lights flicker.
     
  18. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    "They require double wall vent pipe and all kinds of fire code stuff."

    Same as all gas appliances.
     
  19. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If this is more than just a noticeable flicker you should notify the power company. In my house the A/C coming on would cause dimming of the lights. The power company replaced the 15KW power transformer with a 25KW and fixed the problem. Just a thought.
     
  20. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    If you have all of the clearances as specified by the stove manufacturer screw the fire code. A single wall stove pipe is more efficient for heating the house than a double wall. Less heat is lost up the pipe.

    I just recently installed a new chimney for m pellet stove when I replaced my roof with a steel roof. Code calls for the chimney to rise 10 feet from the nearest part of the roof. Problem is that caused shading issues with my solar panels in the morning. As soon as I got signed off I pulled off 7 feet of chimney. Like I say, screw the county inspectors. Effing Nazis.