Hot under the collar at the gun store!!

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by Dearhunter, Nov 25, 2013.

  1. Dearhunter

    Dearhunter Supporting Member Supporter

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    I was shopping at a local gun store here in Charleston, SC and ended up walking out really pissed! I had pick up several pieces of merchandise to purchase and placed them on the counter at the cash register and told the guy I was going to look at some guns. I walked over to the glass case which is about 20 feet long and full of hands guns, new and used. There was a customer about two feet to my right talking to an employee behind the glass casing. I went on looking at guns, I then noticed the guy behind the counter take out a hand gun from the case and hand it to the guy to my right, and the same time the guy took the gun and instantly muzzle swept me and continued to hold the gun sideways pointing the gun at me, I said "whoa" and backed up. neither of them noticed me. He handed the gun back to the employee and they talked. I stepped back up to the counter and when I did, the same thing happed again. At this time I got pissed!! In order to control my temper, I walked off and told the guy at the register that I was leaving, because of the two dip ****s handling the guns and me getting muzzle swept twice. I said the first rule of gun safety is to treat all guns as if they were loaded. Neither of these two dip ****s checked the guns before handling. I told the guy that he could keep the merchandise and I would not be back until someone learns proper gun handling safety.

    Maybe I should not have let it get to me, but hell fire, Its my life.
     
  2. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I like your attitude.
    That is the kind of shop that does provide a poor image of a firearms dealer and owner.

    I think a better way would be to ask to see a user's guide with the salesperson and ask them what that statement means.

    A little guidance could be remembered better than a quick display of anger. Ask any kid what they remember better; when they were taught something by someone or when they had their backside chewed out.
     

  3. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Watch where you point that thing very loud the 1st time. If it happens again get the manager and tell him what is going on. The guy at the register cant do anything and the guy behind the counter needs to trained or fired.
     
  4. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    I agree that would've upset me. Can't really blame you for getting angry.

    I probably would've tried to keep my cool and explain things to both the customer and salesperson, but I can't guarantee I wouldn't have gotten mad too.
     
  5. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    I don't blame you. A couple of months ago I was working a gun show. I was the guy safety checking firearms brought in by the public for trade or sale (you know the famous "gun show loophole"). I enjoy it because I get to handle some really nice firearms. Fellow comes in with a Ruger Bearcat. He is with his daughter, lovely little girl about 10 or 12. I asked to inspect his gun and he assured me the gun was unloaded. I explained I had to tag it before he could take it in. As I was checking it....guess what happened? That's right, a live 22lr fell out of the cylinder. I didn't know a person's eyes could get so big. He looked at his little girl, and I knew what was going through his mind. Empty guns kill people everyday, you had every right to be upset.
     
  6. AR10

    AR10 New Member

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    Anger no, teacher yes. I would have gotten in their faces the first time it happened, explained NRA gun safety rules to them both, and asked them to do it again, properly.

    Education is what is needed to increase public awareness of gun safety.

    Anger does what? Is the gun store any smarter now because you got angry?

    Get a gun safety poster, and take it back to the store, ask them to display it somewhere in plain sight.

    We all need to teach gun safety every chance we get.
     
  7. Baxter

    Baxter New Member

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    I would be mad at the salesperson, but not necessarily the customer. Not all customers are familiar with firearms and firearm safety. For all we know he could very well have been looking at a new handgun to bring to a firearm safety course. With that said the salesperson should have immediately corrected the customer and of course checked the chamber. If the salesperson doesn't know the correct way to handle a firearm, then he probably doesn't have much knowledge either. I'd expect in a LGS to have qualified salespersons. Walmart or big box stores maybe not so much. I probably would have made my purchase and left. Probably wouldn't return with the impression the staff is not knowledgable and not even qualifies for the job
     
  8. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    I would have talked to everyone involved if it was just me. I know the gun would be unloaded anyways. Plus, this is not my first rodeo.;) Now, if a family member was with me, I would not be a happy camper. Probably handle things a bit different.
     
  9. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    As has been pointed out, losing your temper is the wrong way to go about the situation. Simply stepping up as saying something like "Do you realize you're pointing that gun at me?" Or "I'd appreciate it if you watch the muzzle of that gun."

    No matter the situation, failure to control your temper can lead to an unpleasant escalation of the situation, maybe even result in drawing and fireing?

    Bob Wright
     
  10. mikemc

    mikemc New Member

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    Similar situation for me just yesterday but the employee handled it much better. Was showing a customer a Glock (couldn't tell exactly what it was) and the customer started waving it around and even "sighting it in". The employee explained, very politely, the proper etiquette for handling the firearm, to which the wizard customer replied..."don't worry, it ain't loaded". He was told that regardless of considered condition he should treat all firearms as if they are loaded and if he didn't want to do that then maybe he should either; take a safety course and/or take his business elsewhere.

    Customer left to some mild applause and head nodding. I then spoke to the employee for a few minutes and he described this type of thing happening more than what many might expect. He said he always handled it in the same manner.

    Good Job!
     
  11. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I hate that situation, even moreso at the gun show. There is a fine line between staying safe and over-reacting, and i'm not one fit to judge somebody else on that. Me, I have put a pistol down and taken a LARGE step back to avoid a nearby careless customer, and I have explained to the clerk why in a clear and not quiet voice.

    I have also had to tell a redneck buddy to holster his pistol or walk on the other side of the road with his swinging arm of death and 5 foot beer breath.

    I don't feel like it is my job to educate everybody in sight on safety (glass house and such), but i'll not be accidentally shot for being too polite.
     
  12. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Once upon a time I thought, "no biggie. They're ALL unloaded..."

    And then a gun store employee told me story about a neat little piece of decor in the store. It was a story about a used gun that had somehow been handled multiple times during the course of the gun store buying it, multiple times when different customers had looked at it to buy it as a used gun, and had even received a cursory glance over by a gun Smith.

    Then one day a customer dry fired it. Only they didn't, really. They put a hole in the wall.

    The store owner wrote a note on the wall, "treat EVERY weapon as if it were loaded." Right above the hole, and hung a picture frame around it With the back taken out, so that the hole and note were visible to everyone.

    They tried and tried to determine when it had been loaded, and the only thing they could figure is that the gun must've came into the store loaded, and no one ever unloaded it.

    Because manufacturers test fire their guns, this kind of thing could theoretically happen even with factory new guns.

    The only gun that this rule doesn't apply to, IMO, is one that's completely taken apart. And that's only because it's impossible to treat PARTS like they're a loaded gun. At that point, they are only bits and pieces of a gun.
     
  13. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    Do gun stores allow you to pull back the slide, try trigger pull, take the gun apart, etc. when looking for a new gun in the US. Or, is this frowned upon at most LGS? All the LGS over here welcome it.
     
  14. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    It really depends on the store. I am always up-front with the store as to whether or not I am buying that particular day. I always ask if I can dry-fire it once or twice, and have never been told "no."

    I think its all about being polite and respectful and demonstrating a basic understanding of how the thing operates. I think if I were a complete douche and walked into a store, flagging everyone with every pistol I picked up, and just started snapping the trigger without asking, I would be asked to leave at the very least.
     
  15. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I don't trade with a gun shop near my home over a similar situation. The showroom is very small. If you pick up a gun you are pointing it at someone. I was going to buy a SA XD. While I was examining the gun the shop owner said watch where you are pointing that gun in a very rude fashion. He was intentionally trying to embarrass me. I have never heard him say a word to anyone else. I haven't been in that shop in over two years and I have no intentions of ever returning to that shop.

    Not buying the XD was a blessing in disguise. A couple months later I traded a Glock I didn't like for a nicer XD than the XD I was planning on buying.
     
  16. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Usually no one takes issue with examining a gun before you purchase it. I am going to to examine a gun before I purchase it. If the shop doesn't allow examination of the merchandise I don't trade there.
     
  17. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    Thanks for the feedback. I was really curious. :D
     
  18. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    ^^THIS^^

    Tack
     
  19. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I have disassembled a 1911 in a store before. They could see that I knew what I was doing. They were fine with it. I once bought a compact double stack 1911. It was a Para-Ordinance P10-45. It was used. When I got home I realized that one of the internals was damaged. It would have easily been seen if I had disassembled it first. I don't worry about new guns. But I will not buy another used gun without checking it first.

    I would never be silent about someone sweeping me with a muzzle. I would immediately say "Hey, point that in a safe direction!"
     
  20. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I know a guy that used to work in a gun store. He was working on a trigger for a rifle. He was the third employee to handle the rifle. When he pulled the new trigger he shot a man standing at the counter. He was criminally charged. He stood trial and was found not guilty. But it was a life changing experience. EVERY GUN IS LOADED!!!!