Hopkins & Allen Mfg Co

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by HDTOOLMAN1960, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. HDTOOLMAN1960

    HDTOOLMAN1960 New Member

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    I'm new to this sight, so bear with me on this. I have, in my family, a Hopkins & Allen Mfg Co, double action revolver, which is nickle plated. Here is the information on the gun.
    Hopkins & Allen M'F'G' Co
    XL Bulldog
    .28 Cal Center Fire
    Pat March.28.71
    Jan.5.86
    5 Shot
    Octagon Barrel
    Serial # 3340
    I can't find any information on this revolver. I didn't know there was a .28 caliber available. Could this be a mistake. The caliber digits are missing the nickle plating and I had to use a magnifying glass to see what they were. I thought it was a .38 cal until I looked at it real close, but a .28 caliber???
    Is there anyone who can give me any insight on this revolver?
     
  2. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    Posting detailed pictures generally helps...
     

  3. Davyboy

    Davyboy New Member

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    Does it have a spur trigger?
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Looks something like this one? http://www.auctionarms.com/closed/displayitem.cfm?itemnum=9442178.0 Same patent dates. That is .38 centerfire, not .28. I BELIEVE that is a .38 Short Colt, loaded with 14 gr of black powder, not the .38 S&W. H&A made a potfull of single action spur trigger guns, but branched out into the DA like yours. They were not real expensive guns.
     
  5. HDTOOLMAN1960

    HDTOOLMAN1960 New Member

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    That's the one! Thank You! So only 14 gr of black powder. So probably todays ammo would not be a good idea to use in this gun then!?
     
  6. HDTOOLMAN1960

    HDTOOLMAN1960 New Member

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    Can ammo be found for this revolver or is it not safe to be shooting a gun this old?
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2011
  7. HDTOOLMAN1960

    HDTOOLMAN1960 New Member

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    It does not have a spur trigger on it.
     
  8. HDTOOLMAN1960

    HDTOOLMAN1960 New Member

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    I will post some pictures for the record anyway-Thank You!
     
  9. HDTOOLMAN1960

    HDTOOLMAN1960 New Member

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    What would this type of gun sold for back in the day?
     
  10. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    While it MAY be possible to fire it with currently made .38 Short Colt ammo, I have worked with explosives since I was 13 years old,and still have all fingers and both eyebrows, so I tend to be a cautious sort of person. Medical bills are much less when you do that. I would not.

    Ref: selling price- the emphemera (ads, price lists, etc) is the first to go. These were not high dollar guns, and were probably somewhere in the $12-$20 range when new. Now, for grins and giggles, ask you local library to find you a copy (interlibrary loan) of the REPRINTED Sears Catalog- they have them from 1897. 1909, etc (the Sears HOUSE catalog from 1926 is a hoot- pick out a house, they would ship to you. Some assembly required)

    After you finish drooling over the $14 Greener shotguns, go look up the handguns and ammo you could by by mail. Like their 69 cent revolver.
     
  11. HDTOOLMAN1960

    HDTOOLMAN1960 New Member

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    Hopkins & Allen .38  XL Bulldog-1.jpg

    Hopkins & Allen .38 XL Bulldog-2.jpg

    Hopkins & Allen .38 XL Bulldog-3.jpg

    Hopkins & Allen .38 XL Bulldog.jpg

    Here are some pictures of this revolver.
     
  12. HDTOOLMAN1960

    HDTOOLMAN1960 New Member

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    Did these revolvers have to be registered back in the day?
    Also, what is the significance of the two patent dates. Would it be for the approval for the patent date on the first and actual manufacturing for the second patent date?
    Should this gun be registered now, whether shot or not?
     
  13. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Nice sidearm!
    Short history lesson for guns (No I was not around for all of it, dagnab it- just a lot of it)

    Registration of guns. What a ........STRANGE concept. :D

    At the time these were made, you could buy one through the mail. Kids sold Clover brand salve to earn points for a Hamilton .22 caliber boys rifle- yep- a gun MADE for a kid. Until 1934, there was no requirement in law that a handgun HAVE a serial number. In 1968, the Gun Control Act stopped sales by mail, required gun shop owners to maintain a record of who bought what, set age limits on purchases, and required serial numbers on rifles and shotguns. But no registration. Fast forward to 2011.

    In the US, there is NO FEDERAL REQUIREMENT for registration of ordinary rifles, shotguns, and handguns. Machine guns, short barreled rifles, short barreled shotguns, suppressors, etc, MUST be registered. A FEW states have a requirement that owner have a permit to possess, or that a handgun be registered with the state. If you google gun laws (your state) you can pull up a synopsis of state laws.

    Patent dates. The GUN is not patented- improvements in the gun are patented. More than one date, there is more than one improvement. Could be a different ejector system, double action, etc. For years, Smith & Wesson held the patent on boring a hole all the way thru a cylinder, so that it could be loaded from the back.

    These guns are reflective of a time when gun ownership was common, and crime low. Do you recall ever seeing a really cheesy movie called Swamp Thing? Adrienne Barbeaux (Hello Boys!) and this little black kid are in the back country way down South. Hiding from the bad guys, they are in the country store run by the little kids grandma. In desperation, Adrienne asks him, "Is there a gun around here?" Kid looks at her, and says, "What kind of a store do you think this is? OF COURSE we've got a gun!" Opens drawer, comes up with soulmate to your revolver.

    Now, if ownership of that gun is transferred to another person ACROSS A STATE LINE, other than by being inherited, it must go TO a Federal Firearms License Holder (usually a dealer) in the recipient's home state. The dealer would conduct a background check, retain a record of the transfer at his place of business, and you're done.