Hog Hunting - .223 or .7mm wsm

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Okie_6Shooter, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. Okie_6Shooter

    Okie_6Shooter New Member

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    I was just curious to get some different opinions and perspectives. Would you find it more advantageous to use a .223 with a 20 round magazine or a .7mm wsm bolt action with 3 rounds?

    I like the idea of having a lot of ammo to dump into a Texas hog but am not sure about the initial "make em drop on the spot" power. Either way I'd have a sidearm chambered in .40 caliber. The other side would be having less rounds but something that if you can put one on the mark that I would assume would do the trick without much need for follow up shots. Only problem is if you had one charging that the bolt action is slower and only 3 chances at it.

    Thanks in advance and look forward to the input.
     
  2. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Member

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    7mm WSM for the fact that it's got more grunt behind it than a .223 and even if you wound a pig you'll be able to finish it off as it won't be all that mobile where as with a 20 shot mag on a .223 you'll be tempted to go into a spray and pray mode and probably wound more than you kill. Just my thoughts and if you've got a .40 cal sidearm you've got more than enough firepower to do the job.
     

  3. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    7mm WSM.
    I carry an HK USP in .40 while hunting boar. I easily took down a charging boar with a double tap to the head. One would have been enough.
     
  4. sandog

    sandog Member

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    I live out west near Yellowstone, so we have no hogs, but I would think a big boar would be like shooting a good size black bear, and I would not attempt that with either of my .223's. Very small boar , maybe. The 7mm WSM might be overkill, but that's better than being undergunned. Eskimo's have killed polar bear with a .22 Hornet, but that doesn't mean it's a smart thing to do. Here's a pic of a very large Kodiak shot with a .17 Wildcat, but the guy (crazy ?) had a guide with a .458 standing by him.
     

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  5. Okie_6Shooter

    Okie_6Shooter New Member

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    I enjoyed reading the responses. It seemed like pretty consensus that the 7 short mag is the way to way to go. I guess by the time you went through all 3 rounds the next shot would be one charging and then the .40 is sufficient enough to put one down, especially if it was wounded from one of the three previous shots.

    I would just have to try to be as good of a shot as the double tap you mentioned. It's reassuring that one shot from the pistol would've done the trick. How big was he and how far of a shot? With your .40 caliber pistol, what range do you feel comfortable and accurate?

    I can't complain about the area that I'm in that we would also have to worry about bears. I spent a little time in Alaska and there are times that can be a bit unnerving, especially without some fire power. What is the caliber of choice per se in a pistol for a fella in bear country?

    I don't know how he ended up in line with the monster of a bear but I have to tip my cap that he was able to even pose for a picture with that thing. I would definitely say that cig that he's puffing on was much needed and deserved!
     
  6. Tjurgensen

    Tjurgensen New Member

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    If you reload I agree with the 7mm being the best. I own a 270 WSM and it's VERY expensive to feed. That's my 2 cents.
     
  7. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

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    If you hog hunt with a bolt action, carry a side arm so you can dump some bullets into one if you get close and he's not really dead.
     
  8. bamashooter68

    bamashooter68 Member

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    A 223 has more than enough power to cleanly kill a hog. I like hunting them with a semi auto personally but a 7mmwsm should be good medicine for piggy's.
     
  9. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I keep reading how a Bolt in some way is inferior, or insinuated, you need a sidearm. .223 in a semi is the way to go... Really?? This sh!t is old. Have a nice day.
     
  10. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    okie,

    The 223/5.56 is perfectly capable of killing a pig. Shot placement is the ticket. I try to shoot them behind the ear! I have killed a many of pig with the 223/5.56 as well as the 6.5 Grendel round both from the AR Rifle. But also with the idea of having a bunch of rounds as you stated can be an issue. If you hunt with the idea that each shot does not have to be as procise as possible because I have a lot of rounds. You are going to see a lot of pigs run off due to careless marksmanship. The 7MM WSM is an excellent caliber and would do the job well on a pig. And probably mentaly premote you to make more pricise shots. But either will work on the pigs. "ONE SHOT ONE KILL!"

    OK
     
  11. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    I hear you JP. It still boggles my mind at all the hogs we ground into sausage and put on a bar b q grill that we popped with 22 mag. I guess global warming has bred mutant ninja zombie pigs. :p
     
  12. Crazycastor

    Crazycastor New Member

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    I've hog hunted In Louisiana before hogs were pest. I've seen them charge my brother before I took him out with a lucky shot. A razor back is one thing but when they crossbread with domestic pigs they can get huge. I think the location you plan to hunt pigs dictates to what gun you use.
     
  13. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I think a tree stand or elevated shooting position would be in order w/ a .22WMR. But, I would agree with you. JMHO. I can put a 40gr HP .22WMR in a coyotes ear at 100 yards w/ mine. But, you are also talking an era when A lever or bolt was it. People could actually hunt and shoot.

    Pigs run from humans unless cornered or a sow w/ young. Hit them w/ mass weight, they don't get up. Hit them w/ an uber tactical rifle and a low mass bullet, you may have a PO'ed pig. I've sold every Semi Rifle caliber firearm I own. I am a big fan of the Mad minute w/ something larger. Having a rifle that is up to the task is #1. Being proficient is #2. Wearing the correct clothing such as chaps, or purpose made pants can go along way. I bought a pair of LL bean Kevlar chapped pants years ago, just for pigs.

    The size of a feral pig has nothing to do w/ breading w/ domestic pigs. They all were domestic at one time. Finding Russian boar traits on feral pigs is a bigger deal.
     
  14. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    We hunted them with spotlights from the back of a truck. We hunted them with dogs. We trapped the durn things.

    I am not saying you should not use your favorite deer, elk, moose or Sasquatch gun to shoot pigs to get some good practice. But if all you have is a .223, don't worry, go git ya some pork.
     
  15. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

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    :D I still have my LA lifetime license from when I was a kid. After deer season I'm driving down there for a weekend of fun with my cousins. All of those things are still legal in LA.
     
  16. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    I grew in FL, that is where my pig hunting took place.

    I too invested in a lifetime LA hunting & fishing license while I was a resident of the Sportsman's Paradise. Best $500 I ever spent. :cool:

    Bought my wife a lifetime fishing license, too.
     
  17. Tjurgensen

    Tjurgensen New Member

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    Also if you are wanting a semi-auto with a little more power look into a 6.5 creedmoor or a 6.5 Grendel. Personally I think they would be great pig guns but iv never tried them in a semi-auto rifle.