History of the Sniper Game

Discussion in 'History' started by jon1992d, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. jon1992d

    jon1992d New Member

    714
    0
    0
    Ok so this is an game of knowledge and information. The way it works is I post a picture name and other small piece of info about a sniper. The next person must then provide a little more info on that sniper then post another sniper to the thread with the picture name and info.
    Example.
    (me) Snipers name and picture,this sniper served in blank war and used blank as his rifle.
    (you) info on last sniper. New sniper,picture, bit of info.
    It will be fun learning about historys ghost soldiers and finding out new info on them.

    Ill start.
    Vasily Grigoryevich Zaytsev


    220px-Vasily.Zaitsev.jpeg
    Vasily used a Mosin Nagant as his sniper rifle. He also served in WW2.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,448
    564
    113
    "Enemy at the Gates"- Stalingrad. Ran the sniper school for the Soviet Union- his students were "Baby Rabbits". Originated the concept of shooter and scout in teams. Hero of the Soviet Union.


    Beware some of us smiling, kindly old folks.
    This is Charles Benjamin (Chuck) Mawhinney, USMC, Republic of Vietnam

    mawhinney.jpg

    Valentines Day, 1969. M14 rifle
     

  3. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

    4,482
    114
    63
    He holds the record for the most confirmed kills by a USMC sniper, having recorded 103 confirmed kills and 216 "probable kills" in his 16 months of action. On Valentine's Day 1969, Mawhinney encountered an enemy platoon and killed 16 North Vietnamese Army soldiers with head shots from his M14 rifle. Served 1967-1970.

    Mind if I propose a change to the rules? To make it into more of a game, I think it would be fun to have to identify the sniper and what war they served in... Post a picture, some info, and who ever gets it right goes next..

    Something like this:

    [​IMG]

    Fought for the Finnish army. Used a Mosin Nagant without the scope. Was shot in the lower jaw and survived.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2012
  4. jon1992d

    jon1992d New Member

    714
    0
    0
    That sounds good to me. From this point on we are gonna go by your rules. That does make it a lot more interesting :)
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    Simo Hayha. Credited with at last 505 confirmed kills.

    Suspected well over 700, within 100 days.
     
  6. jon1992d

    jon1992d New Member

    714
    0
    0
    Now you have to pick someone with a picture and a little info for us to guess lol
     
  7. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    I know, I just didn't have a picture on hand. I'll get to it. :)
     
  8. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    This cute lady is now a fiery grandmother who still takes no **** from anyone. She also is one who has had a semi famous sniper duel.



    shanina.jpg
     
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,448
    564
    113
    Trip- I'll let someone else take a turn- but my grandaughter named her rifle after the lady in the photo....
     
  10. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    C3, this is a terrible thing, I know her face, her story, and her record, but I can't remember her name!
     
  11. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

    4,482
    114
    63
    Roza Georgiyevna Shanina. Served 1943-1945. Credited with 54 kills 12 of those were enemy snipers..
     
  12. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

    4,482
    114
    63
    [​IMG]

    Served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force. Three times awarded the Military Medal and seriously wounded. Using the Ross Rifle, he was credited with killing 378 Germans and capturing 300 more
     
  13. theropinfool

    theropinfool New Member

    512
    0
    0
    Francis "Peggy" Pegahmagabow, an Ojibwa Indian from Ontario, was the highest-scoring Canadian sniper of WWI with 378 confirmed kills, the highest for the Allieds in World War One.



    image-1071659399.jpg

    Sights were marked to 900 yards. This one shoots a mite further. 500 grain paper patch bullet. Hired to shoot dingos on the Australian outback.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2012
  14. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,448
    564
    113
    Trip, Trez is right on the money. Unfortunately she died in combat. You MAY be thinking of her fellow servicewoman-Lyudmila Pavlichenko

    Lyudmila Pavlichenko.jpg
     
  15. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    I believe your right, my mistake. I saw her on the history channel.
     
  16. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

    10,198
    0
    0
    [​IMG]

    Served with the USMC in the 1st Marine Division during Vietnam. Used both a M2 Browning and a Winchester Model 70 30-06 to get 93 confirmed kills.
     
  17. theropinfool

    theropinfool New Member

    512
    0
    0
    What is this... No one responds to mine just because I made it up? No body said they had to be all "real." (Imagine me doing that weird air quotation thing.) Am I really the only Quigley fan?
     
  18. Muliemaster

    Muliemaster New Member

    2,193
    0
    0
    Quigley kicks dingos butts, all hail the quig
     
  19. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,448
    564
    113
    "I said I never had much use for one. Never said I didn't know how to use it."

    Here's one- do not know the sniper that sent him to history, but his final words were "They couldn't hit an elephant at this distance."

    Who was he???:confused:
    Sedgwick-John-th.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 18, 2012
  20. theropinfool

    theropinfool New Member

    512
    0
    0
    John Sedgwick (September 13, 1813 – May 9, 1864) was a teacher, a career military officer, and a Union Army general in the American Civil War. He was the highest ranking Union casualty in the Civil War, killed by a sniper at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House.

    Sedgwick fell at the beginning of the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, on May 9, 1864. His corps was probing skirmish lines ahead of the left flank of Confederate defenses and he was directing artillery placements. Confederate sharpshooters were about 1,000 yards (900 m) away and their shots caused members of his staff and artillerymen to duck for cover. Sedgwick strode around in the open and was quoted as saying, "What? Men dodging this way for single bullets? What will you do when they open fire along the whole line? I am ashamed of you. They couldn't hit an elephant at this distance." Although ashamed, his men continued to flinch and he repeated, "I'm ashamed of you, dodging that way. They couldn't hit an elephant at this distance."[3] Just seconds later[4] he fell forward with a bullet hole below his left eye.[5]

    Got that from Wikipedia. :)