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In 1955, the Remington Arms Company introduced the 6mm Remington. Fred Huntington designed the cartridge by necking down the case of a .257 Roberts to accept a 0.243" diameter bullet. He topped this cartridge with a bullet weighing 75 grains and called it the .244 Remington. Nine years later, the cartridge was renamed the 6mm Remington, and the name has stayed the same since.

The 6mm was intended for varmint hunting, and many of its characteristics make it very effective for dispatching varmints of any size – including maintaining spot-on accuracy at ranges as far out as 400 yards, maintaining a velocity better than 1,000 feet per second with the 100 grain bullet (even as it sails past the 400-yard mark), and frequently making shots at 500 yards or more. Deer hunters have come to appreciate the 6mm Remington, as it performs very well on medium-sized game at distances as far out as 300 yards.

With mild recoil and accuracy as good as any other cartridge available for sale today, the 6mm is a great choice for a beginning shooter or for hunters who want a deer and varmint rifle with lighter recoil. The similarity between the 6mm and .243 Winchester is unmistakable, yet the 6mm just edges past the .243 in performance.

The 6mm Remington is chambered in bolt action rifles manufactured by many companies, and is also available in single shot rifles. Performing well as a hunting cartridge, the 6mm saw only limited popularity with competitive shooters, and never really enjoyed the success in that arena that its cousin, the 6mm BR, did.

6mm Remington ammunition is uncommon, but is still available without requiring extreme effort. The most easily found 6mm ammo has a pointed soft point bullet that weighs between 55 grains and 105 grains. Muzzle velocity can exceed 4,000 feet per second, and the heaviest bullets can generate more than 2,000 foot pounds of muzzle energy. For shooters willing to search, specialty bullets including Nosler Partition and Hornady SST help squeeze from this cartridge the last possible drops of performance.

The 6mm Remington answers the “One Gun Only” question. It reaches to long ranges, and is available in a wide variety of ammunition. Due to this versatility, this cartridge is a jack of all trades.

History 6mm Remington Ammo originally appeared in The Resistance Library at Ammo.com.
 
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Ammo

Have you stopped by to introduce yourself in that section of the Forum?
Welcome to the FTF. And you are correct about the 6mm rounds. One will find nothing anymore accurate than them. I have shot a 243 Winchester Sako for years. In fact I later built it up into a law enforcement sniper rifle which I used on the SWAT Unit when we first started the Team back in 1983. I took it to Quantico for my first rifle school. And later when we instructed the LE Sniper Schools for the State Academy. And today I also have a 6.5 Grendel Rifle which I love. I aam shooting Hornady 95gr. V-Max rounds. And as you know today the 6.5 Creedmoore has taken leaps and bounds! Fantastic round I might add!
So yes I am a fan of the 6mm rounds.

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Hey, thanks for the welcome! I'll go over and introduce myself now.
 

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I had traded into a Remington 740 that was marked 6mm Magnum. I don't think that name lasted long for the regular 6mm Remington. That rifle may have been uncommon in the day. I traded it off for a nice AyA double.
 
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