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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)

In 1891, the Kingdom of Italy released a new cartridge that set a new direction for rifle ammo in the military. The 6.5x52mm Carcano became the first small bore cartridge to be accepted for service in the military, which lead to the development and adoption of other renowned cartridges – including the 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser and the 6.5x50 Arisaka.

The 6.5x52mm Carcano is a rimless bottleneck cartridge topped with a 6.8mm Full Metal Jacket or Soft Point bullet. Muzzle velocity is between 2,200 and 2,300 feet per second, and muzzle energy is about 1,700 to 1,800 foot pounds. The cartridge is effective for hunting deer and small game out to 250 yards.

The Italian military chambered the 6.5x52mm Carcano in the M91 rifle, which had a bolt action and performed in both WWI and WWII. The rifle had a reputation for poor quality and poor accuracy, not like other military rifles of the time, but the rifle did have one advantage – it had a loose action, enabling fast shooting. This was not enough to keep the rifles in service, and so the M91 was replaced by the M1 Garand soon after WWII.

Many M91 rifles have crossed the pond to the U.S. Some were carried home as war trophies by returning U.S. soldiers, and others were purchased as surplus arms from the Italian government. The M91 is the best known rifle chambered for 6.5x52mm Carcano.

The 6.5x52mm Carcano likely would have gradually faded into obscurity much like so many cartridges from the late 1800s and early 1900s, but this is not the case since it was used to assassinate President Kennedy in 1963. This did not lead to an increase in demand for the M91 rifle and 6.5x52 ammo, but it did keep the cartridge from sliding into anonymity.

There are very few manufacturers today who produce 6.5x52mm ammunition, and no major manufacturers of rifles sell a firearm chambered for this caliber.

Continue reading History of 6.5x52mm Carcano Ammo at Ammo.com for ballistic data!
 

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In 1891, the Kingdom of Italy released a new cartridge that set a new direction for rifle ammo in the military. The 6.5x52mm Carcano became the first small bore cartridge to be accepted for service in the military, which lead to the development and adoption of other renowned cartridges – including the 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser and the 6.5x50 Arisaka.

The 6.5x52mm Carcano is a rimless bottleneck cartridge topped with a 6.8mm Full Metal Jacket or Soft Point bullet. Muzzle velocity is between 2,200 and 2,300 feet per second, and muzzle energy is about 1,700 to 1,800 foot pounds. The cartridge is effective for hunting deer and small game out to 250 yards.

The Italian military chambered the 6.5x52mm Carcano in the M91 rifle, which had a bolt action and performed in both WWI and WWII. The rifle had a reputation for poor quality and poor accuracy, not like other military rifles of the time, but the rifle did have one advantage – it had a loose action, enabling fast shooting. This was not enough to keep the rifles in service, and so the M91 was replaced by the M1 Garand soon after WWII.

Many M91 rifles have crossed the pond to the U.S. Some were carried home as war trophies by returning U.S. soldiers, and others were purchased as surplus arms from the Italian government. The M91 is the best known rifle chambered for 6.5x52mm Carcano.

The 6.5x52mm Carcano likely would have gradually faded into obscurity much like so many cartridges from the late 1800s and early 1900s, but this is not the case since it was used to assassinate President Kennedy in 1963. This did not lead to an increase in demand for the M91 rifle and 6.5x52 ammo, but it did keep the cartridge from sliding into anonymity.

There are very few manufacturers today who produce 6.5x52mm ammunition, and no major manufacturers of rifles sell a firearm chambered for this caliber.

Continue reading 6.5x52mm Carcano Ammo For Sale at Ammo.com for ballistic data!
Ok, now how about a good write up about the History of the 6.5x55 Swedish Mausers. Many of us have them and they flat out do shoot very accurately. Ask me how I know that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok, now how about a good write up about the History of the 6.5x55 Swedish Mausers. Many of us have them and they flat out do shoot very accurately. Ask me how I know that.
Happy to oblige!

History of 6.5x55mm Swedish Ammo

In 1891, Mauser Hunting Rifles developed the 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser cartridge for testing and evaluation by the nations of Sweden and Norway. These two neighboring countries, then known as the United Kingdoms of Sweden and Norway, historically agreed on an ammunition caliber and then purchased firearms of their own choosing. This allowed for a level of logistical flexibility and interchangeability, as both countries together provided for their common defense. The cartridge was used in military service until the end of World War II, at which point Sweden changed to the 7.62x51 NATO. It was chambered in rifles as well as light and medium machine guns. Among the more famous machine guns that fired the 6.5mm Swedish include the Browning BAR, Bren Gun, and FN MAG.

The end of service in the military didn’t mean the end of this cartridge, however. The 6.5x55mm had gained popularity among hunters in Europe due to its excellent ability to hunt medium to large European game. Some characteristics that contributed to its popularity are accuracy, penetration, and moderate recoil – which is why the performance of the 6.5x55 is often compared to the .270 Winchester. The 6.5x55mm is mostly used by Scandinavian hunters to pursue moose and reindeer, although it's somewhat well known among hunters of large and medium game in North America. For the time being, there are no U.S. companies that manufacture rifles chambered for 6.5x55mm, but that doesn't mean this cartridge is impossible to find.

In addition to hunting, the 6.5x55mm has also been used in competitive shooting. It was most commonly used by biathlon competitors who knew and respected the capabilities of the cartridge, and was a popular choice for biathlon competitions until 1975 (at which point the .22 LR became the standard cartridge for the sport). The most common load fires an FMJ bullet weighing 140 grains and moving 2,400 feet per second. Remington, Hornady and Federal currently produce 6.5x55mm ammo, as do Wolf, Privi Partizan and others. Several European rifle manufacturers build 6.5x55mm rifles including Blaser, CZ, Mauser, Sauer and Steyr. If you need a cartridge with great accuracy and mild recoil that will harvest most game in North America and will also do well at the range, the 6.5x55mm is worth consideration.
 

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Happy to oblige!

History of 6.5x55mm Swedish Ammo

In 1891, Mauser Hunting Rifles developed the 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser cartridge for testing and evaluation by the nations of Sweden and Norway. These two neighboring countries, then known as the United Kingdoms of Sweden and Norway, historically agreed on an ammunition caliber and then purchased firearms of their own choosing. This allowed for a level of logistical flexibility and interchangeability, as both countries together provided for their common defense. The cartridge was used in military service until the end of World War II, at which point Sweden changed to the 7.62x51 NATO. It was chambered in rifles as well as light and medium machine guns. Among the more famous machine guns that fired the 6.5mm Swedish include the Browning BAR, Bren Gun, and FN MAG.

The end of service in the military didn’t mean the end of this cartridge, however. The 6.5x55mm had gained popularity among hunters in Europe due to its excellent ability to hunt medium to large European game. Some characteristics that contributed to its popularity are accuracy, penetration, and moderate recoil – which is why the performance of the 6.5x55 is often compared to the .270 Winchester. The 6.5x55mm is mostly used by Scandinavian hunters to pursue moose and reindeer, although it's somewhat well known among hunters of large and medium game in North America. For the time being, there are no U.S. companies that manufacture rifles chambered for 6.5x55mm, but that doesn't mean this cartridge is impossible to find.

In addition to hunting, the 6.5x55mm has also been used in competitive shooting. It was most commonly used by biathlon competitors who knew and respected the capabilities of the cartridge, and was a popular choice for biathlon competitions until 1975 (at which point the .22 LR became the standard cartridge for the sport). The most common load fires an FMJ bullet weighing 140 grains and moving 2,400 feet per second. Remington, Hornady and Federal currently produce 6.5x55mm ammo, as do Wolf, Privi Partizan and others. Several European rifle manufacturers build 6.5x55mm rifles including Blaser, CZ, Mauser, Sauer and Steyr. If you need a cartridge with great accuracy and mild recoil that will harvest most game in North America and will also do well at the range, the 6.5x55mm is worth consideration.
Thank You !!!!!!
I have friends in Sweden I met on another of our family of forums. They hunt their Elk with a lot of 6.5x55 rifles.
For those who are not aware in the US, a Swedish Elk is what we call here a Moose. This cartridge is fully capable of taking any Moose. Used by some in the US for both Moose and our NA Elk. Usually with a 140 or 160gr SP bullet.
 

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Some were carried home as war trophies by returning U.S. soldiers, and others were purchased as surplus arms from the Italian government.
My brother and i owned a bunch of 6.5mm Carcano rifles. There were several variants of the model 91.

One of the reasons the rifles were so cheap was the fact that military surplus ammunition was generally unavailable. We did find about five hundred military rounds at Bannerman's down town Manhattan store. Our deer hunting ammunition was ordered from Philip J. Medicus.
 
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