Herd Immunity May Be Closer Than Expeceted

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by Gatoragn, Jul 5, 2020.

  1. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    https://reason.com/2020/07/01/covid...han-antibody-tests-suggest-say-2-new-studies/

    The Karolinska researchers, according to the accompanying press release, "performed immunological analyses of samples from over 200 people, many of whom had mild or no symptoms of COVID-19." The study tested COVID-19 patients, exposed asymptomatic family members, healthy blood donors who gave blood during 2020, and a 2019 donor control group.

    "One interesting observation was that it wasn't just individuals with verified COVID-19 who showed T-cell immunity but also many of their exposed asymptomatic family members," said Karolinska researcher Soo Aleman. "Moreover, roughly 30 per cent of the blood donors who'd given blood in May 2020 had COVID-19-specific T cells, a figure that's much higher than previous antibody tests have shown."

    "Our results indicate that roughly twice as many people have developed T-cell immunity compared with those who we can detect antibodies in," noted Karolinska Center for Infectious Medicine researcher Marcus Buggert.

    In a second study, German researchers analyzed blood samples of 365 people, of which 180 had had COVID-19 and 185 had not. When they exposed the blood samples to the COVID-19 coronavirus, they found, as expected, that blood from those who had had the illness produced a substantial immune response. More significantly, they also found that 81 percent of the subjects who had never had COVID-19 also produced a T-cell immune reaction, reports The Science Times. If the German study's results prove out, that would suggest that earlier common cold coronavirus infections may provide about eight in 10 people some degree of immune protection from the COVID-19 virus.


    The findings in both of these studies are potentially very good news with respect to public health and the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. Here's hoping that future replications will valida
     
  2. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Lets hope so.
     

  3. Mister Dave

    Mister Dave Well-Known Member

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    - te them. <--the rest of the article

    Thanks for this. Passed it on.
     
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  4. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    Very encouraging. Mind it though, both papers are not peer reviewed. They are press releases, not scientific publications yet.
     
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  5. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't surprise me if, at some point, widespread immune response indicators exist in most of the populations of the world.

    The big question will be: to what extent that will afford a measure of "immunity" as such, if any at all.

    Hard to know that, irrespective of whether individuals have antibodies. Being "novel" this year, it's unclear to what extent any of that will matter, this first time around.

    I hope it will. The sooner it happens, the sooner we'll be to a roughly steady-state situation. (About what can be said for influenza, or the common cold.)
     
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  6. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If it is like the flu with 2 main types, it will be manageable with a vaccine. If there was not a flu vaccine, it would be a much more serious yearly event. If it was like the cold we would in trouble, there are around 200 virus's that can cause the cold.
     
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  7. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    The flu is a cold too, it’s been singled out for vaccination because of its more severe symptoms and mortality. It’s not that vaccines for the common cold viruses are impossible, they are just not worth it. Covid vaccination is certainly going to be top priority, like the flu if not higher.
     
  8. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    Well, me and my wife will likely sit this one out as much as we can until both a reliable vaccine is developed and proven and the wizards have figured out a reliable regimen for treating (with a focus on survival rather than hospital bed availability).

    We're both in the "high risk" category due to age and "underlying health conditions". It would be better off for the gummint were we to both expire from this: look at the cost-savings in MEDICARE, TRICARE-FOR-LIFE, and SS no longer needed to be paid out! Don't try and convince me this isn't an underlying consideration...spoken or not.

    Me and my wife hope to be giving the middle finger 20 years from now on that...
     
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  9. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think Nancy said if the shutdown saved just one life and cost DJT a second term, it would all be worth it.

    Reckon Nancy was talking about you?
     
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  10. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    Rarely spoken, and true. In fairness, the same goes for your insurance company and anybody who owes you money :)
     
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  11. Ghost1958

    Ghost1958 Well-Known Member

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    We would be there by now if not for idiotic power mad governors overstepping their authority and shutting down the PRIVATE sector.
     
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  12. Mister Dave

    Mister Dave Well-Known Member

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    I concur.
     
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  13. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    From that, i assume you think they should have just let the virus run out of control. The idea was to keep the infections low enough so the hospitals would not be overwhelmed. It worked, but it has all being thrown away with the guidelines on re opening not being followed. The hospitals are better equipped now with the time bought, will it be enough for the numbers now being infected, time will tell.
     
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  14. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Well-Known Member Supporter

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  15. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Give it time. infection, weeks latter hospitalisation, then deaths. On the plus side, the hospitals will have better knowledge on effective treatments.

    More and better treatments
    Health care workers have also become more knowledgeable about promising treatments and palliative care options to combat the coronavirus and its effects. For instance, prone positioning, in which patients are flipped onto their stomachs, can ease respiratory distress by opening up the lungs. Critically ill individuals are also now known to be vulnerable to excessive blood clotting, and may benefit from blood thinners. And the steroid dexamethasone appears to reduce deaths among patients with severe Covid-19, although the data demonstrating this emerged only recently. (Another drug, an antiviral called remdesivir, seems to speed recovery, but does not appear to have notable effects on mortality.)
     
  16. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, there are several revelations - anecdotal to be sure - of a number of commonly used drugs. Ivermectin, steroids, and asthma inhalers, for example. https://au.news.yahoo.com/asthma-inhaler-trial-covid-19-treatment-044613853--spt.html
    It would seem that one of the keys to survival is early treatment. Am a but frustrated the CDC/NIH/FDA mostly use trials on those that are most likely goners when administered (much like the HCQ "study" that was done mostly on those on ventilators in the late stage). What ever happened to their mantra about cancer of catching it early and treating it early???

    I'm not necessarily a "conspiracy theorist", but can't help but think this is a "crisis whose opportunity should not be wasted"...
     
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  17. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member

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    There's a decent lag in deaths as compared to known infections. And as testing increases, the numbers treated earlier will also rise, further reducing likelihood of ugly complications or death. But, let's see where we are in a month. Likely, with all of these re-opening galas that states are having, we'll see an uptick in the deaths/day.

    Time will tell.
     
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  18. BillM

    BillM Well-Known Member Supporter

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  19. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    Most quoted studies are in fact press releases. Unverified and not peer reviewed. Raw manuscripts are not normally released in the press until they are published in serious journals. These are not normal times, so the “data” reported by the media will be all over the place. Take them with a grain of salt.
     
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  20. Ghost1958

    Ghost1958 Well-Known Member

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    Yep and alot of those deaths were caused by something other than the virus. If you die of bullet to the head and test positive for the virus the virus will be listed as cause of death.