Help with WWII Garand info

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by sputnik1988, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    Taking up re-enacting an want to change my 1950's HRA to WWII specs, the only difference I'm aware of is the stock. So, what type of furniture did they have and roughly what color was it? Thanks.
     
  2. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    The color of the wood varied due to the type of wood used, and the amount of BLO applied.

    The WW2 trigger guards were forged steel, vs the post war which were stamped. That is a more obvious dif than the stock.

    Get a set of wood from Boyds and refinish to taste. Most of the WW2 stocks were scrapped during arsenal rebuilding after the war, so finding an original is not an easy task (or cheap).
     

  3. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    The only part of my rifle that isn't HRA is the trigger assembly , which thankfully is a wartime forged Springfield piece. Thanks for the info, it was a big help.
     
  4. Torqemada

    Torqemada New Member

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    If I get your question, you should also get a bar lock sight which can be easily seen.
     
  5. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    Sorry I took so long to reply, honestly I forgot about this thread. So I assume BLO is boiled linseed oil? I also assume that the more oil applied the darker the wood becomes, right?
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Yes, BLO is Boiled Linseed Oil. I have a SMLE from 1915 that is BLACK from nearly a century of BLO.
     
  7. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    Never would have thought, blo is a very light color in my experience.
     
  8. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Brit soldiers were required to apply a coat of BLO to the stock every few weeks as basic maintenence. Later beech stocks stay pretty light. Walnut turns chocolate brown.
     
  9. Orlando

    Orlando New Member

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    BLO takes years to darken, its darkens with age
     
  10. Oohrah

    Oohrah New Member

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    A Garand is a Garand. Early gas trap models may be spotted, or may not. Most of the new changes like noted between the early milled trigger guard vs stamped are superficial and may be changed in an armory for a rebuild. Only collectors probably have correct parts through out. I was issued a new one when I entered the Marines in 1958. The stock had a walnut shade of stain. It got a hand rubbed BLO with each cleaning that had kind of a red cast after many applications. One of my Garands is a 50s, rebuild Navy match, rebarreled to 7.62 X 51. it has the old type bar lock hooded match sights. So no matter what period parts go on to the Garand, it's still a Garand. You might want to check on period bayonets that will vary in length.