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One thing about it, the guns will increase in value faster than the money in you savings account.....
I don't know why anyone would have a savings account other than to keep a small amount of funds available is needed often. Savings accounts pay next to nothing. I believe in making money work hard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I've lived in Texas. There are better and definitely worse places to live. Spent much time in Louisiana?
I have spent some time in Louisiana.
 

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Pawn Shop Visit: Years ago shopping the clerk showed me their most recent pride and high priced joy. The gun was a near new Police Positive 32 caliber. The only problem was that Bubba had cut the barrel back and brazed the remains of the front sight on.Condition means everything. I got even worse story on this bunch for later.
 

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Pawn Shop Visit: Years ago shopping the clerk showed me their most recent pride and high priced joy. The gun was a near new Police Positive 32 caliber. The only problem was that Bubba had cut the barrel back and brazed the remains of the front sight on.Condition means everything. I got even worse story on this bunch for later.
On the opposite end of the scale, I had a mental vision of a model 37, went to a pawn shop one Saturday morning and, there it was. Came home with it. It has a very little bluing wear from being holstered but now it's mine. Really good SD gun with only 5 rounds but that doesn't bother me. I carry it often.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
I don't know why anyone would have a savings account other than to keep a small amount of funds available is needed often. Savings accounts pay next to nothing. I believe in making money work hard.
I have money I speculate with and money I want at my fingertips. I mean, who knows when I might need a big bail bond, or need to have ready cash to seal a quick deal.
 

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I have money I speculate with and money I want at my fingertips. I mean, who knows when I might need a big bail bond, or need to have ready cash to seal a quick deal,
Agree. MOST of my money works hard. Per another post somewhere here, we even have a few thousand well hidden in the house. Got caught without enough cash on a weekend ONE time. Never again. They don't arrest people for being wrong on gun forums so you're OK.....:eek:
 

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I am seeing as we speak another event that will cause a value increase. Taking a look at this new generation of Smith revolvers with the lock and sleeved barrel made the price on my old ones double. That's not unlike the difference between pre and post 64 Model 70's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
I am seeing as we speak another event that will cause a value increase. Taking a look at this new generation of Smith revolvers with the lock and sleeved barrel made the price on my old ones double. That's not unlike the difference between pre and post 64 Model 70's.
I think that the locks are a total waste of machining. I do not know of anyone who ever locks their S&W revolver, I have one with the lock and I know I haven't done it even as an experiment. I lock up my guns; different from locking my guns.

As far as the barrel liner, it is just cheap. In the old days companies tried to make the best products possible in order to increase sales and profits. Today, companies want to make the cheapest product to accomplish the same goals. S&W is guilty of the same errors that have brought down other fine companies. They want to live off of their reputation, but cut corners to increase profitability. Of course modern investors care nothing about guns, quality or history; the only thing that is important is short term profits, because, in the end, they will suck the life out of a company, throw it to the wolves and search out their next victims.

As far as practical differences, the lock or the barrel liner don't affect the functionality even if they do affect the perceived value. I don't like them, but I will not let them stop me from buying a piece that I want for other reasons, and at present, I own just one, an M-69.
 

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I think that the locks are a total waste of machining. I do not know of anyone who ever locks their S&W revolver, I have one with the lock and I know I haven't done it even as an experiment. I lock up my guns; different from locking my guns.

As far as the barrel liner, it is just cheap. In the old days companies tried to make the best products possible in order to increase sales and profits. Today, companies want to make the cheapest product to accomplish the same goals. S&W is guilty of the same errors that have brought down other fine companies. They want to live off of their reputation, but cut corners to increase profitability. Of course modern investors care nothing about guns, quality or history; the only thing that is important is short term profits, because, in the end, they will suck the life out of a company, throw it to the wolves and search out their next victims.

As far as practical differences, the lock or the barrel liner don't affect the functionality even if they do affect the perceived value. I don't like them, but I will not let them stop me from buying a piece that I want for other reasons, and at present, I own just one, an M-69.
S&W will continue to sell their compromised guns to people that either don't care or don't know. They're still around so their market research might validate their changes. I wonder if they had not compromised their quality if they could have sold fewer guns but at better margins. Probably not since people buy cheap junk today with no concern for quality.
 

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There is a reverse move on quality going on. Smith has abandoned their traditional methods of making revolvers. In the meantime Colt has reintroduced the Python and other revolvers patterned after the old guns. . I'm thinking that Colt has taken the high ground in the revolver world. Next, let's see what happens to the going price of the old marginal condition Pythons. My bet is that the shooters are out of the old Python market. With shooters, not collectors, Leaving the market prices may drop in the old guns. Could happen or not....no crystal ball here. I'm not sure Smith's efforts at retro handguns ever worked out very well. I just curious how this scene will play out. Sorry, no crystal ball here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
S&W will continue to sell their compromised guns to people that either don't care or don't know. They're still around so their market research might validate their changes. I wonder if they had not compromised their quality if they could have sold fewer guns but at better margins. Probably not since people buy cheap junk today with no concern for quality.
They put the locks on the guns in an attempt to dodge lawsuits, I get that. In a civil trial, the first question concerning the accidental shooting would be "Was the gun locked" the second question would be, "Do you ever lock the gun?"
 

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We have had incidences of toddlers getting into mommy's purse with fatal results. I'd rather see people be more mindful of the dangers of leaving loading guns about. How long does it take a toddler to defeat most any restraint motivated with unlimited curiosity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
We have had incidences of toddlers getting into mommy's purse with fatal results. I'd rather see people be more mindful of the dangers of leaving loading guns about. How long does it take a toddler to defeat most any restraint motivated with unlimited curiosity.
I still think that the Soviets had it right when they said the gun safety was between the ears.
 
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