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I bet there are some stories in those Colt's histories. I got a Smith here that has worn finish and holster wear. The right hand grip is dinged up badly.The left grip is in much better shape.

The was a carry gun. An old time LEO told me about damaged door jambs in stations. There were worn places where holstered gun butts hit.

The guns is in excellent+ mechanical condition. The gun is a Smith&Wesson 38/44 Outdoorsman from 1934. Is it a collectors piece? No way to draw top dollar with finish gone and grips worn. That's the reality of the gun world. It is a shooter. Is it forsale? Got you stimulus money yet? :) No it's not forsale.
 

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The Army Special is not a rare gun, Telling Chain if will be a good investment is a bit much. Collectables are judged on condition. Chain can make up his mind on the. He did not ride up on a turnip truck. If the gun has majority of the finish and is in good mechanical shape maybe. Good condition means tight, in time with no pits.To me, having to been to the mountain with old Colts, man is offering max money. I am biased. Can you tell?
Fair enough MT, but do the values, over time, ever go down on a gun?

Let's look at my grandfather's Remington 11-48, he bought in 63, for $80, and try to find a functional one today, for under $275, with 90% bluing, and no stock damage. Or my other grandfather's Mossberg 185d with a Redding rear ring sights on it, a sub $40 shotgun when he bought it in 48, with all three chokes, 80% bluing, and the orginal paperwork and choke tool. Can't touch that for less than $200, closer to $300, if he had kept the box.

And the same applies to his Colts, the Python, New Service, Official Police, Commando, and the Woodsman that went to my wife, daughter, and me. Especially that $70 Python.

You don't lose money on a firearm, if it's been taken care of. That was my point.

Moot one anyway, as Chain passed on it, as I would have, given what he found upon closer inspection, unless the seller drastically reduced the price to "Shooter" or range toy level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Thanks again to everyone who participated in this thread.

The question of firearms increasing in value, over time, is clear....they do. However, if you overpay for a firearm, then it can be a long time for the paid price to catch up with the fair market value. That said, I have knowingly overpaid for a firearm that I wanted badly enough, but the key is "knowingly." In those cases it was a simple matter of the firearm being more desirable than the cash in my pocket. You don't hit a home run in every time at bat, but you try for a good batting average.

Eight or ten years ago, I found, in a pawn shop, a Colt Revolver that was in excellent shape, it was in .38 S&W and slathered with British proofs. I slipped out of the shop and dug around in my books and saw that the piece was over-priced at $500.00, but I wanted it anyway, and didn't care about the extra dough. Even at that, now, similar pieces sell for 25-50% more than I paid, so in retrospect, it was a good deal and I didn't know it!

I have overpaid for some stinkers too. That has almost always been a matter of an impulse buy, letting the shiny object obscure my judgement. That usually occurs near the end of a long prowling for bargains and coming up empty, it is like my father used to tell me as if the money is burning a hole in my pocket. I used to beat myself up when I came to my senses, but in my later age, I try to forgive myself for my failings. After all, it is all a hobby, something to bring a little joy. Unlike some hobbies, as you get better at the game, it can actually pay for itself. Don't try that with golf, fishing or drinking and womanizing. ;)

This is how a turd of a deal can come out smelling like a rose in the not too distant future: (Post Dunkirk British purchase)

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Fair enough MT, but do the values, over time, ever go down on a gun?

Let's look at my grandfather's Remington 11-48, he bought in 63, for $80, and try to find a functional one today, for under $275, with 90% bluing, and no stock damage. Or my other grandfather's Mossberg 185d with a Redding rear ring sights on it, a sub $40 shotgun when he bought it in 48, with all three chokes, 80% bluing, and the orginal paperwork and choke tool. Can't touch that for less than $200, closer to $300, if he had kept the box.

And the same applies to his Colts, the Python, New Service, Official Police, Commando, and the Woodsman that went to my wife, daughter, and me. Especially that $70 Python.

You don't lose money on a firearm, if it's been taken care of. That was my point.

Moot one anyway, as Chain passed on it, as I would have, given what he found upon closer inspection, unless the seller drastically reduced the price to "Shooter" or range toy level.
The way I look at gun & other values is to keep it in perspective .
A item bought in the 60s price compared to today's price .
What was the average wage for a given job back then & what is it today ?
When I bought some guns years ago I paid top prices for them . It was tough to buy more than one a year . And I had a high paying job compared to others . All in all you don't loose money ( usually on guns you buy ) but you don't make as much as you think most times .
Just how a old guy see it .
 

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Fair enough MT, but do the values, over time, ever go down on a gun?
Yes, prices do go down on guns. Guns can go through a flurry of interest with prices at higher levels even on ordinary marginal specimens. Saying the value always goes up is not universally true.Take, for example, Model 29 Smith in Wesson's. Everybody went crazy over Model 29's in the era of Dirty Harry.. After the original Dirty Harry excitement.there were no more super inflated prices.

Can't say prices always go up. The price on five screw Model 29's is up there today. My 1959-60 era Model 29 four screw gun is a shooter grade gun. It's been factory re-nickled and the finish dinged up. No top dollar there.Condition rules I bought the gun many years ago. It was a different dollar then.Lools like a real deal today. Figured in constant dollars it was not a super deal.

.It's not unknown for somebody to write a book on Bumscrew Specials. Price goes up. Then BS specials come out of the woodwork. Prices change.
 

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But for one, all of the "prices" for my guns have gone up. But, not until I sell them. The first gun I paid for with my money cost me 89.99. Today it would fetch $700 on GB. But, not until I sell it, which I won't do. So, it isn't worth anything until sold other than how I feel about it.
 

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But, not until I sell it, which I won't do. So, it isn't worth anything until sold other than how I feel about it.
Right, it's what we can get for the gun. A point I was trying to make is how much of the increase is due to inflation. I wish my current dollars would go as far those dollars when I bought my $30.00 matching AC 42 P38 Walther. Price increases overtime are not consistent.Prices are a creature of demand as in the Model 29's. Also, on Gunbroker see what is the actual selling price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
But for one, all of the "prices" for my guns have gone up. But, not until I sell them. The first gun I paid for with my money cost me 89.99. Today it would fetch $700 on GB. But, not until I sell it, which I won't do. So, it isn't worth anything until sold other than how I feel about it.
That is kind of like saying that the money you stashed in the saving's account has no value because you are unwilling to spend it. The truth is that situations can change, and that savings money could be spent on that new roof roof you need. I try to stay up to date of what the current retail value of my firearms are, and update my computerized database on a fairly regular basis, and adjust the prices up or down as the market trends, just as I keep an eye on my savings balance.

I will freely admit, that from time to time, I will act like Ritchie Rich, and play in a pile of my firearms, (or on the inventory page) virtually sifting them between my fingers with a lustful grin on my face. Yea, I know It is a little insane, but insanity adds spice to an otherwise somewhat routine life.

(for those of you who are unacquainted with Ritchie Rich, you just may be too young, or if you are old enough, you just never read many comics)

Richie Rich (comics) - Wikipedia
 

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That is kind of like saying that the money you stashed in the saving's account has no value because you are unwilling to spend it. The truth is that situations can change, and that savings money could be spent on that new roof roof you need. I try to stay up to date of what the current retail value of my firearms are, and update my computerized database on a fairly regular basis, and adjust the prices up or down as the market trends, just as I keep an eye on my savings balance.

I will freely admit, that from time to time, I will act like Ritchie Rich, and play in a pile of my firearms, (or on the inventory page) virtually sifting them between my fingers with a lustful grin on my face. Yea, I know It is a little insane, but insanity adds spice to an otherwise somewhat routine life.

(for those of you who are unacquainted with Ritchie Rich, you just may be too young, or if you are old enough, you just never read many comics)

Richie Rich (comics) - Wikipedia
Yeah, as hard as it is to do (j/k), you have a good point there, Chain. I did fairly recently appraise all of my firepower for insurance purposes and every one of them has appreciated, some, amazingly. Lately, my "money" has too with the help of an advisor. Thank you DT for creating a business friendly environment ;)

Concerning insanity, next time you want to see it en mass, get in your car and drive someplace. I used to like to drive but not any more.

So, just about any old Colt has appreciated.

Ever seen that OLD Winchester, forgot which model, that was found leaning against a rock in the middle of nowhere in Arizona? Of course, it was in pretty bad shape but the theory is that someone way back when, laid it down and lost it or just rode off, left it and couldn't find it....who knows? Anyway, it's in a museum. What is a gun like that worth?

Speaking of cool guns, if you're ever near Waco, TX, go through The Texas Ranger museum. It's a must see if in the area. I guess they still have the incredible gun collection they used to have, including Billy the Kid's rifle everyone's seen in his infamous picture. Bonnie & Clyde guns, many guns of criminals that proved crime doesn't pay, although white collar crime seems to ; )
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Yeah, as hard as it is to do (j/k), you have a good point there, Chain. I did fairly recently appraise all of my firepower for insurance purposes and every one of them has appreciated, some, amazingly. Lately, my "money" has too with the help of an advisor. Thank you DT for creating a business friendly environment ;)

Concerning insanity, next time you want to see it en mass, get in your car and drive someplace. I used to like to drive but not any more.

So, just about any old Colt has appreciated.

Ever seen that OLD Winchester, forgot which model, that was found leaning against a rock in the middle of nowhere in Arizona? Of course, it was in pretty bad shape but the theory is that someone way back when, laid it down and lost it or just rode off, left it and couldn't find it....who knows? Anyway, it's in a museum. What is a gun like that worth?

Speaking of cool guns, if you're ever near Waco, TX, go through The Texas Ranger museum. It's a must see if in the area. I guess they still have the incredible gun collection they used to have, including Billy the Kid's rifle everyone's seen in his infamous picture. Bonnie & Clyde guns, many guns of criminals that proved crime doesn't pay, although white collar crime seems to ; )
I will never go to Texas. I am not taking any chances, I am like old Hickey in Last Man Standing, "I don’t want to die in Texas. Chicago, maybe… but not Texas. You can meet me there if you like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·

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Yes, prices do go down on guns. Guns can go through a flurry of interest with prices at higher levels even on ordinary marginal specimens. Saying the value always goes up is not universally true.Take, for example, Model 29 Smith in Wesson's. Everybody went crazy over Model 29's in the era of Dirty Harry.. After the original Dirty Harry excitement.there were no more super inflated prices.

Can't say prices always go up. The price on five screw Model 29's is up there today. My 1959-60 era Model 29 four screw gun is a shooter grade gun. It's been factory re-nickled and the finish dinged up. No top dollar there.Condition rules I bought the gun many years ago. It was a different dollar then.Lools like a real deal today. Figured in constant dollars it was not a super deal.

.It's not unknown for somebody to write a book on Bumscrew Specials. Price goes up. Then BS specials come out of the woodwork. Prices change.
Yes. They do fluctuate.

Yes. prevailing wages change.

Thank you Captain Obvious, as that goes for any product.

in 2004, a Honda VTX 1800 C was about $12,500 OTD, the 1300 was around $10,000 OTD. Know which one is cheaper now? 1300s go for a premium, 1800s are the best secret on the cruiser market, as the price is almost half that of the 1300.

Compare that to a base model 37 Knucklehead, then and now. Demand, popularity, and availability matter, no matter the product, but you sure as hell ain't even in the Zip Code of that Knucklehead, even with reproduction parts, if you are trying to buy it for the original MSRP. Even for a rough one.

Now, go try to locate, and purchase a 1901 made Iver Johnson Top Break, BNIB, for $7, and let me know how that works out. Blued, not nickle, all paperwork with it, any caliber.

Then you might understand what I posted.

Buy that 1969 Produced 29, keep it through the 5 movies, than another 35 years. taken care of, you are not losing money, unless you seriously over paid, way back when, and there is always someone willing to pay what you ask, or what you want, after they "Talk you down" from the asking price.

Me, I don't count that myself, because what I buy is what I usually intend to keep, and if both parties are happy with it, great. I get rid of what I don't use, with very few exceptions.

But hey, you and someone else likely don't care about anything I post anyway, and both universally despise me, so any reply you make is going to be tainted on both ends. So odds are, even if you found a point to agree on, it would still be a point of contention.
 

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But hey, you and someone else likely don't care about anything I post anyway, and both universally despise me, so any reply you make is going to be tainted on both ends. So odds are, even if you found a point to agree on, it would still be a point of contention.
I'm not entirely sure what this is all about. Nobody hates you. They be tired and fed up not to be confused with hate, The opposite of hate is not love. The opposite of hate is apathy. Do you get my drift?
 

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I'm not entirely sure what this is all about. Nobody hates you. They be tired and fed up not to be confused with hate, The opposite of hate is not love. The opposite of hate is apathy. Do you get my drift?
Fair enough.

Believe me, my life goals do not include being loved, much less liked.

However, I am considering the source.

Get my drift?

But I have an easy solution.

Enjoy the new and improved FTF, "SJW" Edition.
 

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Believe me, my life goals do not include being loved, much less liked.
By all appearances you are making grand progress on your goals. You may consider a job as a light house keeper. The rest of the world can admire you from afar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Right, it's what we can get for the gun. A point I was trying to make is how much of the increase is due to inflation. I wish my current dollars would go as far those dollars when I bought my $30.00 matching AC 42 P38 Walther. Price increases overtime are not consistent.Prices are a creature of demand as in the Model 29's. Also, on Gunbroker see what is the actual selling price.
One thing about it, the guns will increase in value faster than the money in you savings account.....
 

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One thing about it, the guns will increase in value faster than the money in you savings account..
The liquidity or how fast I can move the piece also plays in. Should I need the money how fast can I turn the gun is important. At that point in time where the gun is sold gives an absolute value. What am I willing to take? That's another value. Have you ever had a rare gun nobody knew about. They would look at you with glazed eyes you tried to explain.
 

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I went back to the store this morning, gave the gun a very close examination and came to the conclusion that it was not worth it, again the seller wouldn't budge. The bluing was nice, and it was original, but the barrel was an obvious replacement, not close to the same color as the rest of the gun. It would have needed to get into the excellent range to hit the $650.00 level.
With that replacement barrel it will NEVER be excellent, nor anywhere near it, all hints of excellence having followed the original barrel out of the window.

Meanwhile, the seller has a gun he can't sell, with you the only person interested in it.

I'd say the only REAL barrel here is the one that you have him over.

My $0.02.
 
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