Help please

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by DEagle13, Nov 14, 2011.

  1. DEagle13

    DEagle13 New Member

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    I need a little help understanding...grain...ok a 240 grain 45 and a 240 grain 44magnum.....i dunno just a little confused
     
  2. cswann1

    cswann1 New Member

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    Grain refers to the weight (mass) of the bullet. Caliber is the diameter.

    For any caliber of cartridge there are usually several weights of bullet.
     

  3. DEagle13

    DEagle13 New Member

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    So the two I mentioned are the same weight? Wouldnt that affect the power advantage? Just curious
     
  4. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Grain is the measurement of weight of the bullet itself. (the projectile) The caliber determines the cartridge case size and the amount of powder that is used to propel the bullet. ie: a certain amount of powder propels the bullet at x feet per second. There are various combinations for every caliber.
     
  5. DEagle13

    DEagle13 New Member

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    So with a 240 45 and a 240 44 mag...the bullet weoghs the same....
     
  6. cswann1

    cswann1 New Member

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    Yes the bullets have the same weight. You'd have to refer to some ballistic charts to do a comparison. Off the top of my head I'd guess the .44 mag would be the more powerful of the two.

    This is probably the the only thing I remember from high school physics:

    Force=mass*acceleration

    So for any two objects of the same mass the one that is moving with higher velocity will have more force(power).
     
  7. DEagle13

    DEagle13 New Member

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    Ok so same weight....how is the powder measured or whatnot...44 is longer therefore it would hve more powder...but whata the terminology on the powder amount
     
  8. Firearms4ever

    Firearms4ever New Member

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    Gunpowder is also measured in grains. Another factor that determines the velocity of the bullet and the power it has is how fast the powder burns.
     
  9. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    There are 7000 grains in a pound. The type of powder you use will also determine the amount you use. Different powders burn faster than others. Normally pistol powders burn faster than rifle powders. Lets say that you are talking about using a powder like titegroup. A 44 mag with a 240 grain bullet would use a lot more powder than say a 45 acp of the same bullet weight. If you used the same amount of powder in the 45 acp it would go kaboom for sure.
     
  10. DEagle13, sounds like...

    You need to look over a reloading manual.

    Some basics:

    Caliber is the diameter of the bullet and as it happens, the bore, or interior 'tube' the length of the barrel. The bigger it is, the heavier the projectile - usually, but not always. U. S. and some older British calibers are measured in decimal inches, usually hundredths or thousandths of an inch. European (and most of the rest of the world) calibers are measured in millimeters and

    Bullets are the projectiles. They are weighed in grains (1/7000 of a pound) in the U. S. and in grams - usually fractions - in the rest of the world. Gunpowder is also measured in grains or grams. Typically the heavier the bullet and the more gunpowder used, the more powerful the cartridge and firearm. Gunpowder comes in various speeds of burn rate. However, they are not listed by burn rate but by name or designation.

    All firearms have a pressure level. This is the real limiting factor for 'power'. The higher the pressure in the system, the faster the bullet gets launched.

    I said all that to say this: Get a reloading manual and read it. Depending on where you live, the local library might have a reloading manual. Even an old manual will give you the basic information and how all the 'parts' of a cartridge and firearm interplay to give a desired or specific result.

    I don't mean to sound stern or blow you off, but it sounds like the questions you're asking are not two sentence answers.
     
  11. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I agree. You should invest in a manual. Don't try reloading without reading up on it first. That is why I did not tell you how much powder would be used in either cartirdge. Just know that they are not interchangable. Reloading is not complicated. But it is precise.
     
  12. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    As others have stated, the weight of the bullet is the same. The diameter of the bullet is a little different. The .45 uses a .451" diameter bullet and the .44 uses a .429 or .430" diameter bullet.

    The operating pressures of the two cartridges are very different. The .45 ACP is a relatively low pressure cartridge. It is capable of shooting the standard 230 gr bullet around 900 fps. The .44 Magnum is a high pressure cartridge. It is capable of launching the 240 gr bullet near 1400 fps.

    The difference in power is like night and day. Most consider the .44 Mag too powerful for defensive use. It is difficult to control (for most shooters) and WILL overpenetrate a two legged target.
     
  13. DEagle13

    DEagle13 New Member

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    I was just getting confused wasnt trying to piss any one off by asking just about the same question more than once. Thanks for the info
     
  14. boatme98

    boatme98 New Member

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    DEagle, don't worry. Keep asking questions. A good way to learn.
    When I started shooting (waaaay before computers) I would check out used book stores for good books on everything shooting related. Of course a lot of info was outdated, but the basics remain the same. Now with the internet it's a lot easier to find the info you need, but you have to be careful that what you're reading is fact and not someones opinion. I think that's the reason folks are telling you to check out reloading books.
    A good idea even if you aren't going to reload. Scour used book stores and library sales for good cheap books. Also look for old Flaydermans or Blue Books to get an idea of different guns, their quality, and their value.
    Welcome and have fun.
     
  15. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    The only stupid question is the one that you dont ask.. I ask alot of questions to if im trying to learn or figure out something..
     
  16. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    In short answer to the .45ACP VS .44 Rem Mag question:

    The .45 is marginally wider, but the cartridge lacks the massive

    power of the slightly narrower, but same weight .44 bullet.

    I have to agree you've progressed to the point where a good

    reloading manual will be a great help to you.

    Hornady or Speer's 8th Edition, Lyman's or Lee are all a

    literal fountain of knowledge to the average gun-owner,

    regardless of whether you ever reload ammo. IMO,

    any one is 35$ well spent.