Help ME!Snub Nose Accuracy

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by ninjatoth, Jul 16, 2009.

  1. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    I am fairly new to shooting,so I threw up a cardboard target 25-30 yards away.Put in 6 125 grain blazer .38spls in my rossi 462 snub 2",and fired slow and in single action free handed.I was hoping to do better,but maybe my results are common free handed?I highlighted my hits,I feel lucky being so new to have all 6 on paper,but I feel like I could improve alot.I hope someone can read my bullet pattern signature and translate to me what I need to do better.
     

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  2. ccr203

    ccr203 New Member

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    Hi,

    Some of the problem is that a 2" barrel was never designed for the distances you were at. 2" and 3" barrel weapons are designed for up close and personal defense, typically 5 to 15 feet. They really weren't designed for distance shooting.
    Since you say you are fairly new to shooting, I would start by moving your target much closer and see what your results are. Try 2 to 7 yards away, usually a good starting point for a weapon with such a short barrel. Practice at those distances and see how you progress. As you improve, try increasing the distance. Remember though the weapon you have has such a short barrel, it was never ment to group tightly at 25 to 30 yards.

    Hope this helps.
     

  3. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Think of it as a Doctors gun; eyes, ears, nose and throat. You'll also hear the term "Belly Gun", that's because you stick it in the attackers belly and pull the trigger.

    Practice at 7 yards to maybe 15 yards. If you want to shoot longer distances accurately, buy a different handgun, one with a longer barrel.

    Good luck and keep practicing. :)
     
  4. Bigguns911

    Bigguns911 New Member

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    I agree with the up close and personal thing, but you can shot this gun from 25 yards with practice. You should not start out at 25 as a new shooter. The first thing I see your grip. The support thump needs to be moved up and cross the gun hand thumb. Second, pointer finger of the support hand needs to be up and against the trigger guard. The other issue most new shooters have is trigger control, squeeze no pull or yank. Press the trigger back slow and constantly. The gun should go off as a surprise to you. Also dry fire is good. Get some snap caps if you are concerned about damaging the gun. Keep you focus on the front sight and do not look to see where the round are going right after you shot. You need to look at the front sight, shot and get a second sight picture then look where the round went.

    What I see in the target is you are pushing the heel of the gun. This is an anticipation issue. Dry fire should help with this.

    Most of all keep working on it and don't give up. Shot slow at first and get faster as you get more trigger time. Good luck!!
     
  5. masterPsmith

    masterPsmith New Member

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    Do a lot of dry fire. As mentioned, a 2" revolver is designed to be used at combat distances. The average shooting incident will occur within 7 yards. Do most of your practice within that 7 yard distance and practice a lot, if you can find ammo. Contrary to popular belief, the 2 or 3 inch revolvers are inherently (mechanically) as accurate as a longer barreled revolver. Just more difficult to shoot due to , rudimentary sights, short sight radius and increased recoil. I have 2 and 3 inch revolvers that I can hit soda cans with out to 100 yards and will shoot ragged holes at 25 yards. Start your practice close to your target. You don't need ragged one hole groups. Combat accuracy is your goal. As you progress, your speed will also increase. What I mean by combat accuracy is placing all your shots within a 4" group in the upper body mass of your target. You want to be able to do that at any given combat range at any time and any situation. Practice, practice, practice. And, welcome to the shooting community, hope you enjoy.

    I hope this helps,
    Jim..............................
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2009
  6. JoshX3Magazine

    JoshX3Magazine New Member

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    I actually owned a Rossi snubby much like yours several years ago and my first few sets of groups at distance were a lot like yours. Like everyone else has said, a gun with that small a barrel was never intended to be a sniper rifle.

    I would also bring up, not to criticize but to help, your grip. Let me give you a link that REALLY helped me out in the accurate pistol shooting department. It's a great article covering the basics by Massad Ayoob. Your shooting WILL improve once you've read, studied and adopted the techniques he discusses.

    How to shoot a handgun accurately By Massad Ayoob

    Most important: don't get discouraged. Move the target closer, clean up the grip a little, and watch the groups get tighter!

    Josh
     
  7. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    I did see Bob Munden put 5 shots of 38 Spl. out of a 2" gun on a standard 25 yard pistol target... at 100 yards. Two of them were just outside the black. I think the problem is, you and me ain't Bob Munden.
     
  8. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    I have a 4" .22 that I can group about 6" freehanded at 25 yards,as where that snub I get more like 15" from bullseye.I never benched either gun to see if it is the gun at all,since they are cheap guns
     
  9. 1861

    1861 New Member

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    Get your left thumb of top of your right hand . That will cause you to throw the rounds around target .
     
  10. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    Repost your target with the shots numbered, it will help with the advice given. All the same you got good advice this is a close up firearm and not a target shooter.
     
  11. AsmelEduardo

    AsmelEduardo New Member

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    Jerry Miculek

    Not about snubby but advice for revolvers in general. Learning from the best Jerry Miculek:
    Here's some advice from him.... nice set of videos...
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsLx5ISBXw4"]the ...and the infamous video of Jerry Miculek from Youtube[/ame]
     
  12. JoshX3Magazine

    JoshX3Magazine New Member

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    Learning from people like Massad Ayoob and the amazing Jerry Miculek is always a good thing when it comes to revolver shooting. Their basic principles of grip and trigger pull really helped me shoot a revolver well. You can't go wrong with any of that!

    Josh
     
  13. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    Advice Taken

    So,with you guy's advice,I went out today with the only 6 .38spl rounds I own,so I needed to make my shots count,I measured out 7 yards(no more 25 yet) and with an unbenched weaver stance&grip,with 158grn LRN's I did my best in SA.My first shot was low(me trying to compensate),but after I seen it was low,I just aimed naturally,and I think I did pretty good,but that's for you to decide.
     

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  14. AsmelEduardo

    AsmelEduardo New Member

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    COOL! Glad that you improve your shooting.
    That's the way... step by step... once you become proficient @ 7yds. increase the range up to 15 yds.
    Remember that it's a snubby, is not intented for long distances and/or presicion shooting.
    This is a target of my first shots from a Ruger LCR and +P ammo @15 ft ....
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2009
  15. JoshX3Magazine

    JoshX3Magazine New Member

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    That is outstanding!!

    A great group from a gun with that short a barrel. Honestly I think it's a great group, period. :) I actually know a lot of people with firearms that would lend themselves to much better performance at longer ranges that can't hold a group that tight at that range.

    Whatever you did, it's working.

    Now go get some more ammo, have some more fun and build your confidence while you cut holes in paper! Then move back to 10 yards, 15 and so on.

    Have a great day!

    Josh
     
  16. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

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    You already got some excellent advice, but I'll add my two cents. I noticed that you're doing all your shooting in single action, in my opinion a snubnose (which is a self defense weapon) should be shot in double action 99% of the time.

    It is harder to be accurate at first, but it really helps you develope a good trigger pull. With enough practice you'll get good groups even at long distances. I'm a snubnose revolver fetishist, I know they aren't meant for long range marksmanship, but I get a sort of sick satisfaction from shooting them at 20 or 25 meters.

    That 7 yard target looks great. Keep working on the basics and you'll be able to move it further back soon. If I can do it, anybody can.
     
  17. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    I also get a kick out of shooting 25+yards/meters with a snub.I like to set up metal objects at 50 yards to hear a big ping.Just knowing that a snub is possible of firing a bullet about a mile,or 5000+ feet at 45 degrees makes me want to shoot farther than 10 yards/meters or so.
     
  18. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    Nice shooting,
    The pistol is meant for close use so don't get preoccupied with increasing the distance. Fire it as you would expect to have to use it. Same with firing SA, good for you as that will be the condition you will be in if you have to use it for defense. Pulling back the hammer will give you a easier pull on the trigger but not a real life situation. Work on three round quick burst, that will tell you much about your abilities at this distance.

    Looks like you are well on your way. Congrats!
     
  19. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    25 yard distance is usually reserved for target/match/hunting handguns. It's my strong belief you should practice at the distance you expect to actually fire the gun. With snubbys I usually teach to practice no further than 10 yards at most. It's my firm belief that if you are 25 yards away, you're going to have a hard time justifying engaging & using deadly force in court later. Make your practice as real as possible. Simply punching paper that far away in slow aimed precision single action fire does very little to prepare you for actual defensive situations. Get a lot closer and shoot like you mean it in an simulated defensive shoot-that means double action shooting.