Help identifying this revolver

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by six_shooter, Jun 10, 2009.

  1. six_shooter

    six_shooter New Member

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    Hello

    This is my first post, I recently inherited a .44 special revolver from my Father, but I have no idea as to what brand or model it is. The only markings on the gun are serial number on the barrel, cylinder and frame. They all match; But no other info is engraved. The gun comes apart by sliding froward a button on the front of the trigger guard and twisting the barrel. After that a lever on the side of the barrel is pushed and the barrel and cylinder slide forward. To load the gun there is part that slides down exposing the back of the cylinder where the bullets can be loaded one at the time.

    Here are some pictures, I can provide more if needed, any help identifying this revolver will be greatly appreciated.
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  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Not at home right now, and do not have access to my reference books- but will take a guess-

    The scalloped cylinder flutes are characteristic of Belgian manufacture. If you find the letters ELG anywhere, that would nail it down somewhat- Belgian proofmark.

    Almost certain it is NOT a 44 Special- and would STRONGLY advise not attempting to fire any modern 44 ammo.

    The unusual action is tickling my memory- it may come to the surface- if so, will post it. Anyone else with an idea? Anyone? Bueller? Anyone?
     

  3. six_shooter

    six_shooter New Member

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    I don't intend to fire the gun, but I do have some ammo for it:
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    I only have a few rounds left, the bulk of it was fired about 30 years ago, which is the last time I remember the gun being fired
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    I THINK the ammo is not 44 Special ammo- but 44 Russian- see the R? Earlier cartridge than the Special. The 44 Russian cartridge dates back to the black powder era, where the 44 Special is from the Smokeless era.

    HAH! Found it! (God, senility is a terrible thing!)

    I believe you have a Merwin & Hulbert Revolver. Here is a link to some info on the company, pictures of their revolvers, including the innovative loading/unloading system. The unusual cylinder flutes are known as "scoop flutes".

    Take a look: History of Merwin Hulbert and Company
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2009
  5. six_shooter

    six_shooter New Member

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    Thanks
    The revolver does not have Merwin Hulber on it so I assume it is a replica of these revolvers.
     
  6. 1861

    1861 New Member

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    Yep , that is 44 Russian , I use to have one .
     
  7. mr1911

    mr1911 New Member

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    1st thing that came to my mind when I saw the gun was "44 Russian", it just has the look of the ol' S&W Russian guns, looks like someone wanted to make a Russian looking gun without actualy copying the exact mechanical design.
     
  8. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    This note from Supica's Armchair Gun Show:

    "The Merwin collector has to be careful, in that many Spanish copies from the same era are found. Some of these are of good quality while others are lesser guns. An original Merwin will usually have both Merwin Hulbert company markings and Hopkins & Allen (although the Merwin guns were made to a consistently higher standard than the H&A guns.) The foreign copies, while interesting and colorful, were worth less than U.S. made Merwins, and may have the words Merwin Hulbert appearing in their markings."

    BTW, these were chambered in 44 Merwin & Hulbert, 44-40, and 44 Russian.
     
  9. mr1911

    mr1911 New Member

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    Great info guys, loved reading about this gun, I'm going to guess and say I think it's the Spanish version.:confused: