Help Identifying this Pre-Civil War Rifle

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by moosejaw, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. moosejaw

    moosejaw New Member

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  2. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Were percussion caps even around in 1823?
     

  3. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    Wikipedia claims they were invented in 1820. There is a lot of open space near where the nipple is. Maybe a converted flintlock?
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2013
  4. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Not in this country. It was never a flinter even tho there were back action flint locks. My WAG is it was made between 1840 and 1860.
     
  5. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    Looks like an old fowling gun
     
  6. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    The "Back Action" flinters date to 1815 made in America flint locks. Davy Crockett owned one he died in 1836. The posted rifle appears to be a Southern rifle with the long "Lollipop" tang. I would say it was originally an American flinter. The "Back Action" flint lock were know for their superior accuracy due to increased lock speed. They were popular on Squirrel and match rifles.
    Many amateur gun enthusiast believe only front action locks were used during the Flint lock period. :)

    This rifle was made in Jefferson Co. Ky. possible 1820?
     

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    Last edited: Dec 6, 2013
  7. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    That Lock looks to me like an old Brunswick Rifle, but the nipple is wrong..........
     

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  8. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    The percussion cap was listed on Trade company inventory sheets in 1820. :)
     
  9. TimL2952

    TimL2952 New Member

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    I didn't read the other posts, but I saw the picture.

    It could definitely be pre-Civil War and the owner then converted the firearm to a percussion cap system instead of a flintlock.

    The problem with these rifles is that most of them were made by local smiths and aren't really easy to "identify."

    Are there any marks on the gun that you can read?
     
  10. moosejaw

    moosejaw New Member

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    There are no other marks on the rifle, other than the decorative peacocks eteched into the brass. And on the end of the barrell there are small stars around the hole.
     
  11. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think those are pheasants.
     
  12. moosejaw

    moosejaw New Member

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    Not too sure what a pheasant is, at least in terms of guns.

    I guess I should ask, is there any consensus on the identity of the gun or date of manufacturer?
     
  13. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Pheasant is a very popular game bird.
     

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  14. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    Fastest flushing game bird there is !..............
     
  15. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    There's no missing/repaired wood for it to have had the huge lockplate a back action flinter had. The one in your pic is actually a double barrel that turns and has two piece lockplates with two frizzens, one for each barrel. You can see the frizzen for the bottom barrel showing in the pic.
     
  16. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    That is not a Dbl. flinter. and yes the detached frizen on a back action lock takes very little space. Sorry guys, the Ring Neck Pheasant was not introduced into America until March 1881. That would be too late for a rifle of this vintage. :)
     
  17. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And the peacock came......?
     
  18. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    This one is.

    [​IMG]

    The top barrel is fired and then the bottom barrel is turned to the top position for firing.

    Here's the other side.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013
  19. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Gees you are right. That certainly proves it requires removing very little wood when you can mount two of these frizzens on one stock. Thanks for proving my point. I appreciate the assistance, Thx.:)
     
  20. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    I din't prove anything to make your case. Quite the opposite as there is NO missing wood on the OP's rifle and in fact the stock doesn't go up high enough in front of the nipple to even consider it.