Heirloom

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by tzem68, Dec 20, 2013.

  1. tzem68

    tzem68 New Member

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    My father wants to buy my brother and I each an "heirloom" type firearm that can be passed down to our sons, and one day their sons, etc.... My brother is interested in a pistol, and I told him he couldn't go wrong with a Colt 1911.

    I've got a nice inventory of guns, but want to make the right decision. After a lot of thinking and research, I think I've decided on a Ruger Number 1. It is simple, timeless, and a work of art, (not to mention as strong as a brick sh*t house).

    As far as what caliber, part of me wants the old 45-70, which is what a lot of these falling block shooting platforms used over a century ago. The other part of me would like it to be a more "shootable" rifle, with less recoil - something that kids can shoot, and possibly take their first deer with, like a 243.

    I would love to hear others' opinions.

    Thanks!

    Z
     
  2. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I like the Ruger No.1 but I don't think it truly represents single shots? I would be looking at a Winchester 1885 reproduction. The big advantage of the single shot is that it essentially has no action compared to an automatic or bolt action. It is almost all barrel. That lets you get a longer barrel rifle with the overall length of a standard rifle. What action it does have is also extremely simply and accurate. That combined with the longer barrel makes it a great long range rifle, which is what the original single shots were. The 1885 was built for long range precision shooting. The Ruger No1 is a great rifle but I always hated that they didn't take advantage of the design and add a longer barrel.

    As for caliber I would get it in a great long range flat shooting caliber. I don't think it's available in the 1885 Winchester repo. but a 6.5 Creedmoor would be ideal? That's a fairly new caliber (named in honor of the Creedmoor matches) and it was also design for long range precision shooting. It would be a perfect match for the rifle that earned its reputation at the Creedmoor matches. If it's not available then any similar cartridge would work great.

    That would give you a truly classic rifle with an amazing history that would last you and your kids from now on. It would also give you something really fun to shoot and recoil wouldn't be an issue with something like a 6.5 Creedmoor.

    On a trivial side note, the 1885 Winchester was design by John M. Browning and it's what started his legendary career. :)
     

  3. forrest225

    forrest225 New Member

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    I think the no 1 is a great choice. As far as caliber, personally I would go with .45-70. I've fired it out of a marlin, I really didn't think it was bad at all. I think just about anybody could shoot a normal factory load, and I'll bet you could find some cowboy loads that would be lighter.
     
  4. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Single shot rifles are classic firearms. The Ruger Number one is designed from the great Farquharson single shot. This was invented in Scotland in 1872. A classic caliber such as a .375 H&H would be timeless.:)
     
  5. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    Yes, but I'm guessing not very much fun to shoot. :rolleyes:
     
  6. rockratt

    rockratt Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I agree nothing says heirloom like a single shot. But a good lever gun is not far behind. I don't have a thing against the Ruger NO 1 either. They are a very fine rifle. But IMHO nothing would say heirloom like a Shiloh Sharps. You could still go with the 45-70 or my choice would probably be the 45-110..:D
     
  7. Salvo

    Salvo New Member

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    Winchester offers the 1885 with a 24" octagonal barrel in 6.5x55.

    That's what I would go for. - Classic through and through.

    The Ruger #1 just doesn't measure up to the 1885, no way.
     
  8. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    I totally agree with your choice of the #1 and in a light kicking cartridge. +1
     
  9. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I would like a Ruger #1 myself. But I would get one in a more modern cartridge. Maybe a .308 or something like that. I would be concerned about ammo availability in 100 years. I have gotten my son to help me with reloading a little. But who knows latter in life. I would hate for them to sell it because they couldn't get ammo.
     
  10. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    I would not consider the fake Winchesters marked made in Japan. I own and shoot the copies of Sharps rifles.;) I would go with an American made firearm or a high end European Shot gun. Investing in fine vintage Winchesters made in America before 1963 would be better than investing in gold. Colt handguns are always a winner. :)
     
  11. forrest225

    forrest225 New Member

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    That's a good point, I will admit I don't see a whole lot of .45-70 locally.

    I agree with nitestalker, I would not want an heirloom made in japan. I'm sure the quality is there, but it's just not the same.
     
  12. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Ammo in 100 years? Most of the popular rounds we shoot today are over 100 years old. Have you had problems getting .45 ACP, 30-06, 30-30, 45-70, .38 Special the list is endless. Classic firearms in classic cartridges are always more valuable than standard over the counter chamberings. A Pre-64 Mdl. 70 chambered in a .300 H&H or .375 H&H will bring more than the same rifle chambered in .308 Winchester. If you are not a gun collector talk to one. The internet is a great source for Walmart shoppers. For a firearms investment get some good advise.:)
     
  13. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    Of your dad's firearms, which reminds you of him the most? Perhaps your first hunt or dad's most memorable.
     
  14. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Most rifles that end up as heirlooms are single shots and bolt actions. Neither requires a lot of care and they are simple guns that don't break.
     
  15. tzem68

    tzem68 New Member

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    25-5, I will inherit (hopefully no time soon) several guns that have many memories attached, but dad wants to get us new guns of our choice.

    As far as caliber, I can't imagine there ever being a big problem finding 45-70 ammo (or reloading), and that is a classic cartridge. However, I'd like to build a "memory" gun, and what's better than the gun a boy kills his first deer with. That being said, I'm not sure if an 8 or 10 year old can comfortably shoot the 45-70 round. That's why I threw out the 243. Although not an old, classic round (developed in 1955 I think??), it is extremely versatile. Easily kills deer, varmint, and with some of the cartridge development in the last few years, who knows the potential we may see in the future.

    Is the Ruger Numer 1 NOT made in the USA? I just assumed it was, but may be a deal breaker if it's made outside of the US.

    Thank you all so much for your comments, and is look forward to "seeing" some more of your thoughts....
     
  16. therukh

    therukh New Member

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    American made?

    If you decide to go with a Ruger No.1, I agree that a more versatile caliber would make a better gun for a boy to shoot and .243 was my father's favorite and is one of my favorite calibers. I had a tropical No.1 in .45-70 and, being young and poor, traded it for a pistol that I no longer have, but, that's another story. I liked the .45-70 but I agree with you about the .243's versatility. As to the American made question, according to the Ruger website at: http://www.ruger.com/products/no1/, it is American made.
     
  17. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i personally don't think you could go wrong with the Ruger #1. i have shot several over the years and enjoyed them a lot.

    pick something that appeals to you in the cartridge that appeals to you nad your needs or wants and buy the best one that you can find. buy a quality made rifle and take care of it, and you will have an heirlloom rifle to pass down to your grandchildren one day.
     
  18. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I know someone who's father recently died.

    In a bedroom closet, at the back of the house,

    they found a beautiful unfired revolver, in the original box,

    original papers, with a couple boxes of shells, which

    had been sitting there for over 50 years, unopened.

    Fortunately, it was nickel-plated. Had it simply been

    blued, it would probably now be a rusted hulk.

    Lesson learned: Anything I want to pass on to my

    kids has a stainless coating, to help preserve it's

    physical condition, over the decades...
     
  19. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    I have a Ruger M77 RSI International in .243. It is very nice with an 18" barrel and Mannlicher stock. A fine whitetail killer.
    I don't know if they are still made.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2013
  20. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    not for sure they offer that version anymore. i think they discontinued them a few years ago IIRC. they were a classy looking rifle too.