Hearing impairment

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by rika, May 6, 2009.

  1. rika

    rika New Member

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    While looking through the site I remember another question I've been wondering about, and decided to ask before I forget it again ^.^;

    Does anyone know the extent of damage a gunshot can have on one's hearing? Would a single gunshot cause instant ringing in the ears, or would it take several? And how quickly can gunshots cause temporary deafness?

    I hope noone has a habit of firing guns unprotected, but has anyone ever been exposed to gunshots at close range, without wearing hearing protection?
     
  2. Jo da Plumbr

    Jo da Plumbr New Member

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    This depends on the size of the gun and the area in which it was fired. When I first started shooting it was with a 22 rifle outdoors and no ear protection was used. No problem. Then I got a 9mm pistol, again outdoors, and had my ears ringing after the session. Next time I had ear plugs.:rolleyes:
     

  3. LegatoRedrivers

    LegatoRedrivers New Member

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    I fired six rounds from my .38 at the lake just last weekend with no ear protection (I left my plugs in my friend's truck and he made a quick run for some bait worms). My ears were ringing a bit after the first shot, and I still had a little trouble with my left ear the next day. I wouldn't say there was any temporary deafness; I could still hear better after firing a few rounds than I can with earplugs in. You should always wear hearing protection, but I'm not sure how quickly permanent damage would result.

    I'm sure there's someone here with more experience than I who can give a more thorough answer... :)
     
  4. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    Hunters are exposed to shots without hearing protection all the time. Yes, 1 shot can cause ringing that can last a few days depending on the load. Not so much with a .22, but a 3" mag 12ga will. When range shooting I always wear protection, but in the woods, never.

    I'm sure someone can come up the the db levels of gunfire for you.
     
  5. rika

    rika New Member

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    From what I have read, a typical rifle sound pressure level is around 150~160 dB, some even higher. If I remember correctly, an M1 Garand is supposed to dish out a whooping 167 dB! Not so sure about pistols, maybe a little lower?
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2009
  6. Jo da Plumbr

    Jo da Plumbr New Member

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    Sounds like you have done some research. Why the interest?
     
  7. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Each and every shot you take with your ears unprotected damages your hearing for LIFE. in side your inner ear is an area that is full of microscopic hair fibers that transmit sound. When you are exposed to loud noises what happens is the hair get sheared off. The hair is not really hair but nerve endings. When this happens it causes the ringing.

    I should know I have 30% hearing loss in my right ear and 45% loss in my left.

    With the technology today there is no reason for anyone to be shooting without earing protection on. Why would you hunt without hearing protection? I know I don't I use electronic ear muffs and I want a set of walker game ears.
     
  8. rika

    rika New Member

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    I'm working on various models/simulations for a game, to provide a very realistic and interesting atmosphere when using firearms. I'm sick and tired of the piss-poor, oversimplified systems used in most games. Thus I have studied many things related to firearms, however, the more I study/research, the more interested I become ^o^

    The physics is just so damn interesting!

    EDIT: I probably have 400+ MiB of reference material, from wounding physiology, to cartridge dimensions, to ballistics, to material science, to fluid dynamics ^____^ Add 1.7 GiB if you want to count the ASTM standards I downloaded. Plus a whole lot of links, and even more pages I just read without bookmarking. Been almost a year, going from knowing absolutely nothing, to knowing a little bit ^^ Although I've never fired a gun in my life, only theoretical work.

    So true! I was actually a little surprised/anguished to hear that maybe not everyone use hearing protection. I don't think it's such a wise choice, skullcrusher T_T

    EDIT: whoops, sorry! Didn't mean to post two separate replies.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2009
  9. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    My thought is there has been more than a few saying they are developing a game and need info. For the most part the information is easy to get from the manufactures. So why ask the question here? Maybe to get some nice quotes for another use?
     
  10. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    Thanks, and how else should I live my life? I suppose I shoulda worn headgear for every rock and metal concert I've been to, eh mom? If anyone can find me a 'game ear' that can actually distinguish the game I'm hunting from every other critter, let me know. If you've ever spent as much time in the woods as I have just listening...

    As I stated, Mother rika, I use protection when plinkning and sighting in, dorika. Isn't there a breather of city air you could be watching?
     
  11. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Many years ago, for several years, I pit crewed for a sprint car team before sound control was mandatory. For over 5 years I expesed my ears to what was measured at 20 feet from the car 125 to 130 db's. Before I was 30 y.o. I had lost near 28% of my hearing. Back in the early 1980's sound control was required on the cars and the db's were reduced to 80 to 85 db's at 20 feet distance from the car. Since then I have learned to continued exposure to 120 or so db sound levels will induce permanate hearing loss. Continued non stop sound levels in excess of 155 db's is in the range of sound weapons. Certain frequency levels of extremely high db level sound damages much more than hearing.
     
  12. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    Who did you pit with? Expect you knew Fred Brownfield.
     
  13. rika

    rika New Member

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    I have sent questions to Lapua and Vihtavuori (I live in Finland), but it is also very good to get practical info from shooters themselves.
     
  14. rika

    rika New Member

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    I didn't mean to be condescending or imply that I know best how you should live your life.
     
  15. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I pit, for a short stretch, for the late Dave Bradway jr. After I left he became a outlaw circut racer. He died in 1988 at Skagets Washington between 1 &2. There was a rut in the track that most of the race was avoided but just past the midway mark of a 30 lap, I believe, event he had to go into the rut. The Chassis was a Tognitti chassis that was not totally leagl and when the car commenced to flip it collapsed on him and he was dead. However, the cause of death didnt come from the chassis fairlure but from the violent tumbling of the car which ripped the aeortic arch out of his heart. They said he probably didn't feel a thing. He was a good friend of mine and I knew him for many years before he got into sprint cars. He worked for Stammerjohn Racing engines and was at the time their head engine builder. When this happened to him he was racing for Clyde Lamore who owned Tri C machine in West Sacramento. They were sponsered by Coors and his car at the time was a "Silver Bullet" Car. I hadnt pit for him since 1982, when he was not a Outlaw racer, when he was working his way up with his own car and just a few local sponsers. Most who knew him has never gone to a race since. Bill Stammerjohn a few years later sold out his business and became a math professor at a university in Washington.

    I didnt know Fred Brownfield as at the time Dave raced in California at Silver Dollar raceway in Chico, ocassionally at Placerville, and Freemont. I did know Wayne Sue who was at the end of his racing carrer in the first few years I was involved in this sport, and I knew Steve Kinser, as at the time he was racing these tracks.

    I havent been or watched a race since Daves death. I have no more interest.

    Before I hooked up with Dave and his group, me and a couple of friends did campaign a Vega Pro Gas dragster. We dicided after a couple of years of the Pro gas car we would get into what they called an Econo Rail. Let me tell you what, theres nothing econimical about a Econe Rail class dragster. I had to bail on this endevor and expense of this dragster with my friends about half way through the second season we raced it.

    I used to in the mid 70's until the early 80's have a shop where I built engines for street and some high effort professional engines. It was a good business until mail order motors prevailed in about 1982. There was never enough money in professional racing engines at the size my endevor was to keep going after the mail order motor thing happened. All the street stuff dried up. Mail order motors won the day. Small guys like me couldnt compete with their prices. Also fuel prices, insurance, and laws killed the real street scene about this time. The days of 8000 plus RPM high ft pound torque 800 plus hp 1-1/2 MPG street beasts became extinct. Now it's 4 banger Asian imports with insane oversize exhaust that rules the day on the street. Cheap to build (in most cases) easy on fuel and cheaper to insure.

    To be totally honest about this time in my life, I didnt really miss it. At that time I was getting totally really board with it. The love for it was already long gone and it was no more than a income. I've found much easier ways to make income since then and do quite well now as a Telcom contractor to the utility companys.

    Jeeeze I kind of went on a tangent here. Sorry