hay bailing on my farm....

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by bobski, Jul 30, 2013.

  1. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

    6,347
    26
    48
    thank GOD IM A COUNTRY BOY......

    i sure hope you guys comin' to the shoot and hoot like farm life. cows mooin', hawks circling, quail running, dogs barkin'.....it aint city life for sure. its so quiet on the farm, you can hear you ears hissing and you can see shooting stars at night in any direction.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

    3,150
    22
    38
    Man, I wish I had a way to bale my hay and grass :(

    My steer may have to eat some 'store bought' this weekend, poor boys.
     

  3. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    I have some very fond and special memories of square bales. Baling hay is almost a rite of passage for some folks.

    When you have several thousand you have to get in, and they each weigh between 60 and 100 pounds depending on whose farm your helping out at... if you can keep up, you're one of the men.

    It was such a big deal, farmers from my area scheduled their cuts so that no two farmers had cut hay on the ground at the same time. It was a community effort, putting the youngest and the oldest on the tractors, and everyone else trying get it done.
     
  4. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

    6,347
    26
    48
    i donated this crop to my neighbor. his cows needed it. this is the way we do things in the sticks. next crop i'll be using for some backstops on my range for patterning.
     
  5. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

    6,347
    26
    48
    who says a tractor has to always be green!
    here my toys.....
     

    Attached Files:

  6. rockratt

    rockratt Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,158
    0
    36
    It was the same here. My grandfather throwed me in the hay field when I was 11. He would drive the truck( he was no dumbie) while I wrestled the bails into the back. Every once in a while he would stop and come back to help me stack. That was the beginning of what became my summer job up until I got a real job. Everyone around here has went to round bails because it got to where you could no longer get help hauling square bails.
     
  7. rockratt

    rockratt Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,158
    0
    36


    image-489629421.jpg

    Some are Orange!!
     
  8. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

    3,150
    22
    38
    Mine is also orange :)

    Here it's moving some old stumps in the north end of the property
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

    4,435
    28
    38
    I don't miss stacking square bales one bit! Thank god for round baler's,that was the best invention ever for the farmer/rancher,at least for their kid's.
     
  10. MOshooter

    MOshooter New Member

    1,474
    0
    0
    Very nice Bobski,is that a Ford 4000 from the early 60s?...It looks a lot like our Ford 4000 except the front sheetmetal's the same color as the fenders.
     
  11. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

    6,347
    26
    48
    its a 2000 last of the detroit gas 4cyl's.

    hey rockratt, you be rich. you got a door on your barn! :>
     
  12. rockratt

    rockratt Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,158
    0
    36
    Woo boy!!! Not hardly. I just drive junk and needed some where to work on it!!!:D Ha to go set with my mom while my dad went to town. Will PM you later.
     
  13. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

    29,445
    314
    83
    Bobski, I'm looking forward to enjoying your land for a weekend. I love the country life.
     
  14. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

    6,347
    26
    48
    if you shoot well, i'll let you drive ole jim dandy! hes the little guy on the farm!
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Airborne1

    Airborne1 Member

    989
    0
    16
    Looks like it may have a wisconsin engine n it!

    Ken
     
  16. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

    3,852
    0
    0
    I heard they were going to ban the round bales. Seems the cows can't get a square meal. :D
     
  17. F4U

    F4U Well-Known Member Supporter

    2,557
    65
    48
    Picture_001.jpg

    Wrong color of orange.

    We did not get a baler until the mid 80s when grandpa had some heart problems. Until then we hauled it in loose. About 2:00pm grandpa would start to rake the hay into windrows, my brother and I would ride our bikes over there and by 3:00pm we were using pitchforks to make piles of hay about 3' around and high. The grownups would show up about 4:30. Mom or Aunt Dorothy would drive the tractor pulling the wagon( the smallest tractor in the picture, it was the biggest one we had at the time.)the men would load the wagon using pitchforks, there is a system to this to "build a load". The younger kids would ride on the wagon tramping down the hay as it was loaded.

    When the wagon was loaded we headed for the barn, the wagon was pulled part way into the barn and unhitched. The tractor was then brought outside and used to push the wagon the rest of the way into the barn.

    The tractor was then hooked to the rope connected to the hay fork. The hay fork was jambed down into the hay on the wagon and the tractor would pull the rope, a series of pulleys would take the hay fork with about 10 or 15 percent of the hay up and over the hay mow when the guy on the wagon (usually my dad) would pull the trip rope and drop the hay into the mow. The older boys were in the mow and would spread the hay around. The tractor would back up, the hay fork would come back down and the whole process started over again 6 or 8 times for a load. Then back to the field for another load.

    You knew you were considered responsible when you got to drive the tractor pulling the hay rope, because of the way it was set up if you screwed up you would do a huge amount of damage to the barn.

    About dark we would go up to the house for a cookout that grandma and the other women had ready. We ate outside or in the garage. Looking back I think that was because by this time we smelled too bad to allowed into grandmas house. lol
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2013
  18. rockratt

    rockratt Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,158
    0
    36
    My grandpa decided he would put his up loose one year. I was glad too. No buck'n square bales on to the back of the truck. It was just me and him and it was all done with pitchforks. Thank god the following year he decided to go back to square bales and never do that again is all I can say.
     
  19. wechols

    wechols Member Lifetime Supporter

    101
    0
    16
    I have terrible hay fever, burn under the sun and was a senior in high school before I weighed 120 lbs at 6' tall. Built a lot of character putting up bales all summer to buy school clothes.
     
  20. JW357

    JW357 New Member

    6,716
    1
    0
    I guess I'm just a city slicker. I've only stacked hay bales for about a month of my life. I was around 14, and my friend's grandparents had a farm in Quebec. We went up there and stacked bales of hay, shoveled sh*t, painted, and whatever other odd jobs were necessary. We also de-rocked a couple fields.

    It was hard work, but I really enjoyed it.