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I respect that opinion 100%, I just personally like firearms for their looks, caliber and history. A GEW 98 is a beautiful rifle unfortunately, it was the main long arm for the Germans in WW1. However, I’d love to have an 03 Springfield as well. I’m also not huge on Civil War era firearms but Union manufacture firearms will definitely be of better quality. The confederate rifles made by the British are pretty cool though in .577 Cal. and of a better quality then something strictly confederate manufactured.
I also respect the historical and aesthetical view point.
 

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I guess, I’m just freaked out by stuff used to kill Jewish people or slaves, or to defend those ideologies. I’d much rather have a gun used to defeat the Nazis or the Confederacy. Plus, Union guns were much better made- all steel frame, not brass.
Not all of them thar Yankee guns, were exclusively used by Yankees. Many a captured northern soldier's arms ended up being used by the men of southern units, same with ones recovered from the dead.

Personally, it never bothered me who used it, and for what reason. What matters is how YOU use it, going forward. If it bothered me, I sure as hell wouldn't have my New Service or my Python, as well as a few other ones my grandfather saved from destruction, after the cases made it through court.

His .32 Caliber Chicago Palm pistol has at least, two bodies on it, a store owner, and his wife, that he was involved in the investigation of their murders. My US Revolver in .38 S&W was another one with a past, that involved it being shot, at him and a bride one night, while on patrol.

Set to end up in Lake Erie, after the investigation was over, it ended up in his pocket, and joining his other rescues.

Me, I like having my Germans, Japs, and Italians. Same with my Russians and Chinese. What matters isn't what we did in our past, but what we do, going forward. If it applies to humans, then it certainly applies to a firearm, that could only have stopped it from happening by breaking, or running out of ammo.

But would they tolerate a Galil?
Mine tolerate a pair of them. A few DEs as well, and an Uzi Carbine, and Micro. Even the wife's Jericho 941.

My German's are very polite, and tolerant of their safe mates.
 

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Uncle had a wooden chest full of neatly packed Confederate notes. Where he got them, perhaps some that the James Gang hid in the caves of the mountains south of Winchester Tn, or.....HE BURNED THEM! i could have spit nails. Grand Ma said leave them alone, they are illegal. Where she got that I don't know. He had a double barrel muzzle loading shotgun with the stock painted in blue red and yellow chevrons. Belonged to my my Ancestor a Chikamaka Indian.Mentioned in Tn Indian Agency records early 1800s. Named by Missionary. Everyone in the County is his descendant, just about .They were there before the Cherokee. They called them the wild men of the mountains. Circa 1730s gun I handled it. It belonged to his Father maybe
HE BURNED IT TOO! So I didn't inherit anything in the firearms or Confederate items.
 

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Worked the suicide of an old man who walked out into his pasture, sat down on a rock, and shot himself. Returned the .22 pistol to the family. Perhaps a year or so later, his son took the same pistol out to the same rock and did the same thing. Some people wanted suicide guns returned, some wanted them destroyed. An option I offered was to donate them to the Missouri Conservation Commission's Hunter Safety Education program to hopefully keep youngsters from getting hurt. A few we intentionally blew up by clogging barrels, jamming them in the ground, firing wrong ammo (20 ga in 12 ga, etc.) to be used as teaching aids.

No case history was ever provided with suicide guns nor were any sold, carried off, or otherwise put back into circulation. Court orders were obtained individually in each case to ensure "conversion" did not take place under my watch. I'll never forget the old man and his son and, although I know it wasn't my fault, what happened did have something to do with that pistol going back to the family. Pistol ended up in a smelter at Doe Run, Missouri.
 

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Maybe it’s me- but owning a Nazi or Confederate gun is a little too weird for me- they belong in a museum as guns of the enemy, not in private homes to be celebrated. Just me, I couldn’t own a gun that was in the hands of people as bad as the Nazis, the Confederacy, or the Commies.
It is a little weird.

But I try to acknowledge the thing as a mechanical tool, not "the enemy's" thingy, and certainly not a reflection of the ideology that motivated those people to attempt the things they did.

A bit like, say, having a post-WWII built Yugo 48 Mauser. Was certainly based on the standard 98K Mauser platform, but it certainly wasn't "the enemy's" tool.

Haven't owned any C&R items, myself. Other than that one Yugo post-War Mauser. But I'd like to think that this sort of thing isn't any more an item of warfare and ideology than, say, the 1917-built Colt 1911 pistol or the Uzi or CZ 75.

Generally, I figure they're tools. Everyone makes 'em.
 

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Plus, Union guns were much better made- all steel frame, not brass.
BM: It was unnecessary for the South to make firearms etc. The North made enough for both sides.

I asked one time what was the most deadly firearm used against Americans. The answer was the 1861 Rifle musket. Both sides.

Ran into an 1861 in a pawn shop last year. A little too pricey. I've got the remains of an Austrian 1861 dated .54 caliber rifle musket. Those rifles were used in numbers by both sides. Does that balance things out? :)

Added:I got a Smith&Wesson 38-44 Outdoorsman. The finish is worn and the right grip is worn smooth. I assumed it was used by an LEO in the day. Assumed is the operative word there. There are some initials in the butt. That's the only clue. Too poor for a factory letter-$100.00.
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I just stick to when & where things were made . Reading all that other stuff into it is just a waste of time to me . In my collection of saps ...... I have a flat sap that has blood on it . ( not mine ) Someone got there butt kicked with it but it is just another sap in the collection .
To many feel guilty about what they own or what others own . Old things are neat to see & own . Going to deep in the weeds about things can only take the joy out of collecting them . All you guys that feel bad about owing things ...... send them to me ...... I will give them a nice home ! :)
 

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One I forgot about. This rifle may be the complete compromise. That would the good guys and the bad. It's a built up gun but is correct. This rifle has Israeli proofs so that end of our compromise is in place.

The balance of the rifle is made of Nazi era Mauser 98 components save the receiver which is marked DOT45. Now the stock is the killer. It's early Nazi era laminated with flat, not cupped, butt plate. Kinda unusual. What really sets the stock aside is the cut in the left side for a ZF-41 Scope.

There's probably fifty different stories in that rifle that would be told in several languages. Remember it's good guys and bad guys on these guns.
 

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It is a little weird.

But I try to acknowledge the thing as a mechanical tool, not "the enemy's" thingy, and certainly not a reflection of the ideology that motivated those people to attempt the things they did.

A bit like, say, having a post-WWII built Yugo 48 Mauser. Was certainly based on the standard 98K Mauser platform, but it certainly wasn't "the enemy's" tool.

Haven't owned any C&R items, myself. Other than that one Yugo post-War Mauser. But I'd like to think that this sort of thing isn't any more an item of warfare and ideology than, say, the 1917-built Colt 1911 pistol or the Uzi or CZ 75.

Generally, I figure they're tools. Everyone makes 'em.
Yet most bolt action rifles are based on a Mauser action which as we know is a action that was designed for military rifles so in a round about sort of way your using a military designed action whether you like it or not just for hunting or collecting.
 
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Yet most bolt action rifles are based on a Mauser action which as we know is a action that was designed for military rifles so in a round about sort of way your using a military designed action whether you like it or not just for hunting or collecting.
That or the 700 action.
 

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One I forgot about. This rifle may be the complete compromise. That would the good guys and the bad. It's a built up gun but is correct. This rifle has Israeli proofs so that end of our compromise is in place.

The balance of the rifle is made of Nazi era Mauser 98 components save the receiver which is marked DOT45. Now the stock is the killer. It's early Nazi era laminated with flat, not cupped, butt plate. Kinda unusual. What really sets the stock aside is the cut in the left side for a ZF-41 Scope.

There's probably fifty different stories in that rifle that would be told is several languages. Remember it's good guys and bad guys on these guns.
The Israelis had no trouble at all with using German made K98ks. I've seen plenty of them with peened out dirty birds and six sided stars.
 

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Yet most bolt action rifles are based on a Mauser action which as we know is a action that was designed for military rifles so in a round about sort of way your using a military designed action whether you like it or not just for hunting or collecting.
Well, they had contracts for production through that sales channel, yes. Even if it was frequent in their ramp-up as a company. Makes sense, given that that's where the money was. "State" armories. Juicy contracts. Nice way to start.

Though, most of their stuff was simple rifles and pistols. Which were easily sold through many markets, even though gov't armories were one of them.

It'd be like saying a Colt revolver's a "military" weapon since they went after military contracts early on in order to get into the game. Or that a Glock pistol is a "military/police" weapon since that's one of their channels.

Now, a CIWS system for the Navy, and cannon for the army ... well, that's something else. Hard to see that as anything other than a "military" system.

Anyway. Probably all semantics.

Good thing they were around, Paul and Wilhelm. Great contribution with the basic Mauser bolt rifle platform. I'm sure they'd be pleased to know that that basic design underpins most of the more-successful bolt-action rifles today, even 140yrs later.
 

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We have a lot of Confederate antiques, we bought. Had family on both sides.
Brother has a Winchester, Ted Williams a Sears Brand in .30-06. If you short stroke it or don't do it just right that claw that positive feed jams up. My Remingtons didn't do that. Only have the 660, in .308, left. Like to let others shoot it with Mi Surplus ammo. It will untie you shoe laces and even set them afire or try too. The muzzle flash lights up the day time. :)
 

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About 10 years ago i was at the range with my FB Radom VIS 35 which was also a war trophy to someone unknown to me. Next to me was a grandfather, daughter, grandson & grandson's wife shooting a Luger. On a reloading break i walked over to ask about the gun (i hate being that guy but i've never seen a Luger at the range). The grandfather told me he found it when they took a Nazi outpost. He took it off of an overweight kraut that had shot himself with it while sitting behind a desk. He made no mention of rank, only that the dead Nazi was quite obese & had probably been dead awhile since he stunk really bad.

I showed him the VIS & he vaguely remembered seeing a couple of those picked up by other soldiers during his time over there & that they thought it was some cheap knock off of a 1911.

I apologized for interrupting them, thanked him for his service, let him & his family continue to enjoy their range time.
 
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