Have you changed your basic FOOD inventory theory or practice.....????

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by AGL4now, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. AGL4now

    AGL4now New Member

    12
    0
    0
    Have you reassessed your reserve food type or inventory allotment in the last 24 months........???

    When I turned 65 y/o I assessed my basic theory for the next 15 years. Now nearly two years into the revised plan, I feel good about the new direction. I aspired to list the known natural disasters that had to be considered; Forest Fire & total loss of everything above ground, Being down wind of a Volcanic Eruption resulting in up to a few feet of volcanic ash, Catastrophic Earthquake which could destroy roads for several months, Grid Down for extended period of time, maybe very extended period of time.

    Next I took an HONEST inventory of my physical ability at age 65, then estimated what that would be at 70/75 & 80 years of age. I decided to scrap any consideration to years beyond 75 y/o.

    From this model I re-looked at my past food storage theory. And made changes as appropriate. The main shift was to more Freeze Dried Food and an Extensive Caching program.

    Other changes were made in reassessing the area of firearms for the future, and clothing for the future.

    Have you looked at your fundamental theory with fresh eyes.........????
     
  2. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

    1,638
    0
    0
    I wish I could go more with freeze dried food, and have been just recently buying more, but it is the most expensive of my three layers of food storage (canned goods, which get rotated through general use; bulk foods such as rice and beans in mason jars with oxygen absorbers; and pre-packaged freeze dried foods.
     

  3. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

    1,598
    0
    0
    I have some bulk rice sealed and other dried foods. Ramen, noodles and beans. What I need to do is learn more about canning.
     
  4. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

    3,937
    0
    0
    Yep

    I've definitely reassessed my food inventory theory. After developing several food allergies triggered by ticks I've had to completely rethink a lot of things. My goal for last year was to produce almost all of my own meats (hunting), veggies, nuts, and fruits. Mammals are off the menu for the moment. I should get to where I can eat most mammals again soon, but I might not ever be able to eat beef, pork, or lamb again. I can get by without the beef and pork but venison was a big part of my inventory plan. I had three deer in the freezer when I learned I couldn't eat them.

    Freezing isn't a good storage plan but I wanted to focus on producing last year and then expand into different storage methods this year such as canning and smoking. So for the moment I'm playing this by ear on the meats. And nuts are also off the menu so that isn't going to be an issue, which sucks because of all the pecan and walnut trees around here. Many of the nuts store well and are great for you. Plus having to avoid peanuts is a real pain. Oh well.

    I'm still good on the veggies and many fruits. I didn't get to do a garden this summer but I'm set for the spring and some fall stuff. For the fruits I know where some fruit trees are that I have access to but I've got to get some of my own in the ground. One of the trees I want to plant is and Arkansas Black apple tree. They're supposed to be great for storing and eating in the winter. I'll find out before too long! :)

    Much of this is related to production rather than storage but I don't really differentiate between the two. I think it's just as important to be able to produce food as it is to be able to store it. There are a number of potential disasters that could prevent me from producing so storage is very important, but there are also a number of scenarios that could prevent me from having access to what I have stored. That makes being able to produce just as important. :rolleyes:
     
  5. Crazycastor

    Crazycastor New Member

    481
    0
    0
    I would say to keep meats and the nuts and use them as barter. There will be people around you that will need things. This is great barter foods. Especially the pecans. If you have it and can't eat it store it anyways. Especially if it doesn't really cost you anything.
     
  6. DaughterofAres

    DaughterofAres New Member

    143
    0
    0
    Ok I love all this stuff. And I really think I could live in the root of a tree and live off the land etc. etc. Stick me in the woods I never want to go home. AND... Cooking your food without smoke (so you won't be noticed) would be beneficial to any plan. Check out on youtube "16 brick rocket stove". I built a 24 brick one. The fuel is STICKS... sticks, tiny sticks that you pick up off the ground. It's so easy and the most efficient heat. I cooked up a storm. I love outside cooking and anyone can build it.
    -photo1- The Rocket Stove that DOA built, boiled water in 8 minutes.
    -photo2- Beef wraps with a side of rice. (the rice was better than any rice I made on the stove)
    sharing the love,
    DoA
     

    Attached Files:

  7. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

    3,937
    0
    0
    Thanks for posting that. Now I've got to start keeping all the firebricks I find while metal detecting around old home sites. I will definitely be trying that soon (I'm always on the lookout for new ways to cook chicken). :)
     
  8. mich1377usmc

    mich1377usmc New Member

    606
    0
    0
    Sorry phone acting weird today. Here is rocket stove made out of a gallon paint can, large bushes baked bean can, & 2 Campbell soup cans. Filled with sand, same as brick rocket oven but more portable.
     
  9. DaughterofAres

    DaughterofAres New Member

    143
    0
    0
    Vermiculite can also be used as insulation. And yes, I saw the can rocket stove too! very cool.. out of bean cans!! for pete sakes!!! lol~ We want to build one that is the in the "J" shape or form. Apparently it feeds by itself. but that's another big project on another day. and probably a lot of trial and error.
     
  10. DaughterofAres

    DaughterofAres New Member

    143
    0
    0
    LOL! photo 2 ??? Where's the beef??? that doesn't look like beef and rice. LOL! That was breakfast... sausage and potatoes. oops I mixed up the photos being all excited and all...
     
  11. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

    3,022
    40
    48
    Not something I have thought about. To me its putting a lot of time money into something that might ever happen. I could store beans but my wife complains that they make me fart. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2013
  12. mich1377usmc

    mich1377usmc New Member

    606
    0
    0
    For me, making these stoves or similar ones are more an exercise of can I build this thing, as far as $$$ I paint my house & eat canned beans and soup. Also it better to have and not need , than need and not have. Knowledge is free.
     
  13. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

    3,937
    0
    0
    I figure I've got plenty of wood laying around and I find fire bricks all the time around old home places so the cost will be zero. I love cooking out side this time of year anyway and it could come in handy one day. Definitely something worth trying. :)
     
  14. mich1377usmc

    mich1377usmc New Member

    606
    0
    0
    +1 TLuker learning in the fat times makes the lean times not so lean or hard. I'm looking for old fireplace bricks myself , so who knows ??? BTW my company had an operation a few years back on Emerald RD, always liked your part of the world & that BBQ joint by the lake was to die for.....LOL
     
  15. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

    3,937
    0
    0
    Ain't that the truth. And just to add to that, I've been working on cutting back on my spending for awhile. Actually I want to get my spending down to a bare minimum. I was thinking the other day that it's actually kind of fun to see how low you can get your spending when you have money to spend, but it really sucks when you have to cut back because you're broke.

    I don't like what I'm seeing with the economy and I think the majority of us are going to have to cut back on spending. I would much rather cut back now while it's a choice rather than wait until there is no choice.

    What company?

    And luckily for me that BBQ place has some really good fried quail!:)
     
  16. mich1377usmc

    mich1377usmc New Member

    606
    0
    0
    Textile recycling company called Bollag International , we're being sold to another recycling company called Martex, as far as the BBQ joint watching I ate in there was good, even brought some home to the misses once.
     
  17. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

    3,937
    0
    0
    There BBQ is great but since I can't eat beef or pork it's off the menu. All I can do is remember how good it was. :cool:

    I used to work right across the road at Kaiser, and later Revstone Forgings. That plant is opening back up soon and hopefully I'll be back there.

    Little side note, there is a small strip of woods between Kaiser Bollag (directly across the road from Bollag). There was an old home place in there and attached is a picture of a Pepsi and a Coke bottle I found in there. The Pepsi bottle is roughly 1908 and the Coke is 1921. I only mention that because you have seen the area. You probably don't even remember it because it is such an obscure looking spot. But that just shows how we pass by interesting places all of the time without even noticing them.

    I had worked there everyday for years before I checked it out and I found all sorts of really neat old stuff in there. The world is full of wonder if we just slow down long enough to notice it. :)

    Pepsi.jpg

    Notice "Greenwood S.C." embossed in the bottom of the bottle just below "Pepsi-Cola"?
     
  18. mich1377usmc

    mich1377usmc New Member

    606
    0
    0
    Yes, you are right about slowing down to "smell the roses" or explore your soundings. Don't remember much around our building there but I was always getting on my game face for work. I use to find glass Clorox bottles around older homesteads around here.
     
  19. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

    3,937
    0
    0
    Here's my favorite Clorox bottle, It's cork top. And beside it is a Milk of Magnesia bottle from 1906 that was found with the Clorox bottle.

    Clorox.jpg

    I love finding old bottles and metal detecting around old home sites. I learn a lot about people's everyday lives from it. And it's just cool to hold a bottle that's over 100 years old. Not to mention all the history that goes along with bottles. Learning to identify bottles by how they were made is the history of the industrial revolution. :)