Handgun for my son?

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by PeaShooter22, Mar 19, 2013.

  1. PeaShooter22

    PeaShooter22 New Member

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    My son started shooting when he turned 12. He first got a 22 rifle, and when he turned 13, I got him an mp22 pistol. His 14 birthday is coming up and he loves shooting my full size 9mm and wants to get a m&p 9 for his birthday. Is that a wise decision?
     
  2. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    I would wait until he is 18. No matter how trained he is, it is still a bit dramatic for a pistol at that age. Unless you keep it or separate with the ammo. It your decision as a father. Just be careful and let him know how serious firearms are.
     

  3. PeaShooter22

    PeaShooter22 New Member

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    He will not have any acces to the pistol or ammo at all. Ill transfer it to him when he is 18, but until then the only time he would have it out is when he is cleaning it with me or shooting it at the range
     
  4. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    Then go full steam ahead. I see nothing wrong with that.
     
  5. PeaShooter22

    PeaShooter22 New Member

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    Thanks for the help
     
  6. molonlabexx

    molonlabexx New Member

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    Anytime. I like helping like minded people. Good luck and happy shooting!
     
  7. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    In the ancient world, the father would offer his son a spear as a symbol of manhood. Later, a sword, musket etc The key being reaching manhood. Manhood includes responsibility, morals/values, self-reliance, honesty and citizenship. 18 is today's norm of reaching manhood in the United States. Buying a handgun higher then a .22 caliber is a great gift for reaching "manhood". This is my two cents and philosophy. God bless you for raising one of our youth to become a responsibily citizen practicing one of our rights as an American.
     
  8. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    If that is what he wants and you think that the 9mm will not develop bad habits go for it. Nothing wrong with it.I might also think about starting him off with for example a Browning Buck Mark or Ruger 22 Target pistol. My though is #1. He will learn the basic fundamentals of shooting a handgun including sight Picture, Sight Alignment, proper grip[ and stance, as well gain a considerable amount of confidence in his ability. And starting out with a caliber that will not develop bad habits like flinching and pre- anticipating the pistol going off due to recoil of a larger caliber. Once a flinch or pre- anticipation of the shot is developed at this age it is hard to break. Just some thoughts to think about. But you are the Dad and know your son the best. I thank God you and the family are exposing him to the shooting sport and at a young age. He will have years and years of enjoyment and lasting memories due to Dad! "YOU! And also a very important issue as well! He when he becomes of voting age he will more than likely help the future generations in protecting and preserving our Second Amendment Rights and the sport! "Way to go Dad!"

    03
     
  9. PeaShooter22

    PeaShooter22 New Member

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    Thanks for your kind words
     
  10. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    My grandmother gave me a .38 snubby when I was 15; it never got me into much trouble. (Granny had started to "fade" a bit by that time, sweet lady.) Properly monitored, I would think he would be fine.
     
  11. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

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    I think it's fine. When I was that age my father got me my own 1911 because my father got tired of me hogging his at the range.
     
  12. shouldazagged

    shouldazagged New Member

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    My son has three boys, ages 14, 11 and 8. All have been very carefully trained in firearms safety and all shoot under my son's very strict supervision. The eldest will probably begin deer hunting with his own .243 this fall, again in the company of his dad. All three boys have shot the lovely Smith Model 15-8 I gave my son, the older two a lot. They won't officially own handguns till each turns 18, but they'll know how to handle them responsibly. It's all about good teaching, and always has been.
     
  13. Max-Q

    Max-Q New Member

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    My 13 year old son saved his money and bought a Glock 19 when he was 8. He has worked and put his money towards quite a few firearms and I've given him several others for his birthday. He just bought an EAA Witness P Carry last week with his own money. I think he has 13 guns now including two SBR's.

    I keep them locked in the safe and he will get them when he's 18 but I'm proud of the fact he has learned to work and save his money for something worthwhile instead of wasting it on video games and other crap.
     
  14. nosaj

    nosaj New Member

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    Also, look at it this way.....for now it's another gun in your house :) ....or at least until he is old enough to move on...
     
  15. qwiksdraw

    qwiksdraw New Member

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    Would you adopt me? could use another 9MM.

    I promise to be behave, too.
     
  16. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My son got a .,22 S&W "Kit gun" at 8. He got a S&W model 19 .357 magnum at 12. He worked part time and saved his money and acquired a Glock 17 at 15.

    They remained locked in my gun safe until he left home for college at 18.

    I've seen 21 year olds that I wouldn't trust with a pocket knife. And I seen many 12 year olds that I wouldn't hesitate to trust with an MP-5 full auto. Depends on the kid.
     
  17. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    Personally, I don't think there is a darn thing wrong with buying your kid a handgun if he is mature and responsible enough to own one.

    The preconception that young boys cannot be trusted with firearms is a manufacture of today's society not based in fact. Obviously you do not want to break the law, don't let liberal paranoia dissuade you from doing the right thing for your child.
     
  18. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    That does seem like a reasonable purchase. I am a year older and I have not even shot anything above a 32 auto.