Hand Tools For Evacuation Kit?

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by GatorDude, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. GatorDude

    GatorDude New Member

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    What kind of hand tools and hardware supplies do you take in case of an evacuation? I've been thinking small self contained tool kits like these would be handy for bugging out:

    Tool Review: Fixa Tool Kits from Ikea - Associated Content

    However, a little bit heavier duty kit would probably be better.
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Well, depends on how you will transport all your stuff. Limits on weight and bulk if you are packing it yourself.

    My personal AWCRAP pack has a Leatherman, and 4 hacksaw blades (and a roll of 100 mile an hour tape)

    The toolbox on my pickup includes wrenches, screwdrivers, hammer, bowsaw, hacksaw, axe, file.
     

  3. mpd8488

    mpd8488 New Member

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    If it's for your vehicle there is no reason to not carry a good set of tools. Buy good ones to begin with and they'll last forever. If it's for a carry pack a good multi tool, knife, and one of those folding camp shovels should be all you need.
     
  4. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Evacuation? For what reason and for how long? If someone tells me I have to leave my house they better be armed...and if I am forced to leave my house I will be armed, and my "evacuation tools" will be a Lee AutoPrime, a single stage press, dies, powder, primers, and bullets...as well as every gun in my house and anything else I can't easily replace that is of value, and all the cash I can carry. Some parts of the country have never had to evacuate, I'm lucky to live in one of them..
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2009
  5. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    My bug-out bag has a hatchet (which can be used as a hammer), a couple knives, a folding tree/limb saw, and a multitool. I also have some nails, rope, a tarp and a bunch of other things. The idea is to be able to build a shelter reasonably easily. I don't worry about tools suitable for tearing down the engine on my car...

    Bug-out locations should be well-stocked with a variety of tools to do many jobs.
     
  6. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    I understand, appreciate, and agree with your sentiment. Someone telling me I need to leave won't go over too well.

    But if I choose to leave for safety reasons, that's a different story. Have you given any thought to a bug-out bag and a bug-out location?
     
  7. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    I have thought of it and have a small cabin on property I own. I have food stuffs and hunting & survival gear stored there. I just can't come up with a scenario where I would be required to leave my house. I'm too old to start wandering the country side raping and pillaging...:D So if the worst ever happens (non-weather related) I'll stand and defend what took me my whole life to acquire...my kids are grown and on their own, but know they are welcome if they need a place to stay.
     
  8. layton

    layton New Member

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    If that ever happens, that is my thought also, fortify in place, besides if everyone tries to bug out, it will get very crowed any way.

    Layton
     
  9. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    My endgame follows a slightly different theme, no offense.

    But if you are packing tools, don't forget some rope & maybe a little wire. If you are talking about a car kit, don't forget extra fuel line for siphoning and such.
     
  10. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    +1 and game will become non-existant...
     
  11. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Yeah, in that case the rope and wire will come in handy when I catch your ass siphoning gas from my vehicle...;)
     
  12. layton

    layton New Member

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    You mean that you would actually confront him with the hose in you tank and not just pop a cap?:D



    Layton
     
  13. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    I wouldn't want to risk blowing up my own car...:eek:
    Then again, being a pot-head, he'll probably be smoking while he's syphoning...:rolleyes:
     
  14. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    In this area lots of people improved their siphoning skills after Katrina. My dad had the sense to buy the gas from a neighbor's crushed Expedition to use in his generator. Lots of peeps down here now have natty gas generators hooked up to the house lines; it never went off for some reason.

    And there's no way in heck i'd be that far north RL. :D

    Too late, a buddy learned that lesson for me. My first car was a 65 beetle (stressing beat) with a non-functional fuel guage. I would check it with a dipstick (cap under front hood); as we stopped to water the bushes on a rural nighttime ride, i asked a buddy to check the level. When i looked up dude had a lit zippo over the open gas tank; he understood when the rest of us dove for cover. Luckily, the tank was soooo low there weren't even enough fumes to catch fire. We didn't make him walk all the way home.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2009
  15. layton

    layton New Member

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    Here, they just crawled under the car and punched a hole in the tank.

    Layton
     
  16. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    It's the fumes that cause the explosion - it lowers the "flash point" dramatically - you're safer with a full tank than an empty one. You can throw a cigarette into a can of gas and it will go out - try it when the can is almost empty and it will explode.
     
  17. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Not all the siphoneees were crushed, though.

    RL, it was really, really low, maybe two gallons at the most. I did feel very lucky not to have to explain a flaming car though. :D
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2009
  18. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    10-15% tank capacity is perfect for a nice explosion - what's a VW Bug tank capacity? 12-15 gals? I had a buddy who burned to death in his 1970 VW. He ran off the road drunk and hit a telephone pole - the car caught fire and was engulfed by the time the fire dept. arrived. His brother and one other friend were in the back seat and escaped out the rear window. So did the passenger in the front seat. He later told us the damned gas tank ignited instantly, and being a VW, his brother was pinned behind the wheel by the gas tank and telephone pole...he was conscious the whole time he burned.
     
  19. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Fully understand the "defend in place" view- HOWEVER- self assessment time.

    Watch the weather radar- determine the wind movement patterns in your area. Then look at what is UPWIND from you. Powerplants? Chemical plants? Rail lines? Nuke facilities? Major cities? The chemical plant boo-boo in Bhopal India was 25 yrs ago- and killed an estimated 15,000 people

    While I CAN "defend in place" for a limited time from chemical or nuclear accidents, key word there is limited time. It gets really hard to eat while wearing MOPP 4 gear.

    For some folks, the weather itself may be a cause for unplanned movement- hurricanes, floods, fires, ice storms, plague of frogs, plague of locusts, etc.

    If you are already occupying defensible terrain, and the threat is HUMAN locusts, well, OK- then drop the abatis across the road, arm the Claymores and the Fougasse, and check the range cards. But there are natural disasters that may force your hand. Do some planning while you have leisure time.
     
  20. sharps_74

    sharps_74 New Member

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    Y'all have some good ideas on what to pack. My bug out vehicle is on four hooves so I would add Things like nippers, double-sided file, sandpaper and one of those collapsible hoof stands. As always, get good quality, your life may depend on it. For those that shoe their bug out vehicle, good iron shoes with cleats work well for going up and down mountians. There are also boots for long rides on hard surfaces.