Hand Loading Questions

Discussion in 'AR-15 Discussion' started by ed0312, Aug 10, 2012.

  1. ed0312

    ed0312 New Member

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    I just got my Rock River AR and love it. The only problem is that I called their support for a handloading problem and they wouldn't talk about it. My problem is that after full length sizing the rounds work fine except when I try to manually clear the chamber. The rounds chamber fine and eject with no problem when fired. It's only with manual clearing that they stick. I would appreciate any help. Thanks in advance.

    Ed
     
  2. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    generally firing handloads will void any warranty.
     

  3. ryguy00

    ryguy00 New Member

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    Check your seating depth. The bullets could be sticking into the lands and sticking when you try to manually cycle. If its not the bullet then its the brass. Most ar's require small base dies for reloading. Make a dummy round and seat the bullet .025-.045 shorter than normal. Load and manually cycle 2 or 3 of those and see if they stick. If not, then increase length gradually until they do stick, make note of that length, and start loading a few thousandths shorter than that. No powder, no primer makes a great dummy round. Keep a few on hand for practicing malfunction drills. If you decide you made too many dummys, you can always dissamble with a kinetic puller
     
  4. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    all manufacturers say that to satisfy their lawyers. If we didn't reload, shooting sports would die in 20 years or less.

    I own guns that have had as much as 10-12 thousand rounds through them, and never a single factory load.

    :p
     
  5. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    Not arguing....but this could be why RRA refuse to talk to him about it. I find it best to just leave my handloading addiction out of the conversation when talking to gun companies...ESPECIALLY when discussing warranty work.
     
  6. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Very good point. I hadn't thought of that.:eek:

    BTW, OP, next tme call Speer, Hoprnady, Hodgdon, etc insteaD of the gun company with handloading problems. I've had really good lucj with these guys, especially Speer and Hodgdon.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2012
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    stuck rounds when manually cycling the action is almost 99% of the time incorrectly sized brass. the force of the bolt will jam the brass into the chamber and make it "stick" this increases pressure and can cause a kaboom.

    best method for insuring brass is sized correctly is with a case gage.

    next best is manually cycling a re-sized empty case. any stickiness the sizing die needs a 1/8 turn down. keep doing that until it hand cycles with no stickiness.

    the way i set my sizing die is to raise the ram all the way up so the shellholder is at the very top, then screw the die in until it hits the shell plate. lower the ram then tighten the die 1/8 to 1/4 turn more and test with a case.

    the reason that companies dont warranty reloads is that there is no way to ensure that the end user is loading correctly. while factory ammo is pretty crappy it is true that most guns that blow up are from handloaders who arent following the correct safety procedures and often shortcut or ignore steps.
     
  8. ed0312

    ed0312 New Member

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    Thanks for the info. I'll give some of the ideas a try.
     
  9. steve4102

    steve4102 New Member

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    Give JonM's advice a try first. Your rouinds are not to long and sticking in the rifling if they fit the mag. Jon has it nailed, your sizing die is not set up correctly. Screw it into the press 1/8 of a turn at a time until an empty sized case will chamber and extract with ease.

    If after loading a properly sized case and it gets stuck then you most likely are over crimping due to an improperly set up seating die. To much seating die crimp can buckle the case and cause the round to hang up.
     
  10. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    One thing i forgot to mention be sure the case length is not overlong each time you try to chamber the test case. If the case mouth is too long it will stick in the chamber