hand gun for my wife

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by Ozz2g, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. Ozz2g

    Ozz2g New Member

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    I want to get my wife a hand gun for self defense, but I'm not sure if I should get her a 9mm or .380. All my friends tell me to get her a 9 because it's bigger. My main concern is that she won't be able to handle the recoil. Would the .380 be enough or should I stick with the plan to get her a 9mm?
     
  2. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Started my wife on a 380- She quickly went to a 9mm & now dearly loves her Ruger SR9C - She said she really cudn't tell much difference in recoil -
     

  3. vincent

    vincent New Member

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    Do you have a range nearby that rents guns? If so, go there and have her try them for herself, she can tell you better than any of us. Good form and fundamentals will overcome any percieved recoil. A few of our esteemed female forum members shoot the bigger calibers with no problems.
     
  4. Firearms4ever

    Firearms4ever New Member

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    Vincent and Hoss are spot on. The only thing I have to add is take her to some local gunshops and let her "try out" the various firearms they have in their inventory.
     
  5. fins59

    fins59 New Member

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    I would add ( and I'm no expert ) but in my opinion and my wife's. Try a .45, the recoil on comparable size guns (9mm & .45) feels the same to us. We went .45 for that reason alone. She loves the bigger round.
     
  6. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    How much training does your wife have?
    Knowing the proper hold, stance, and safety matters is more important than what caliber.

    I taught my niece when she was 12 (yes, I'm NRA certified). She likes to pick up a gun and shoot 2X4's at 50 yards with a .45ACP.

    At the time, she was about 5 foot and skinny as a rail. 95lbs soaking wet.
     
  7. Mark F

    Mark F New Member Supporter

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    She has to try out some guns, and SHE must decide what works for her. Forget all the hype about caliber, knock-down, etc. The caliber simply doesn't matter it she doesn't like it, and doesn't use it.

    Been there, done that, with my wife... and she ended up liking my Smith & Wesson Model 60 (.357 Mag) best.

    Ya' gotta' let her decide...
     
  8. jismail

    jismail Member

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    I am a firm believer in the KISS approach.

    Unless she is willing to spend enough time to fully understand the pre-fire operation of an automatic and commit it to muscle memory, I would get a revolver for HD.

    my reasoning is simple: The 'panic' reaction of an untrained shooter is simply "point and pull" - for an automatic, depending on the condition it is stored, that may or may not result in a discharge. For a simple Da revolver that has no need to check the status of the safety, magazine, or a need to chamber a round, it will result in a sucessful firing and if it truely is needed in a HD situation, the seconds saved may be critical.


    JMHO....
     
  9. TruggieTex

    TruggieTex New Member

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    Bought mine a hammerless SW 5 shot .38. She likes the no-brainer, double action, stiff trigger, and the visual cylinder load status. The grip fits her hand and though she will shoot a semi pistol, she is very comfortable with the revolver.
     
  10. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Why not let her try them both and decide for herself?
     
  11. charliegirl

    charliegirl New Member

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    Definitely let her try for herself. Guns are like shoes. Everyone likes different ones for different reasons. You wouldn't dare try and tell her which shoes feel the most comfortable, right? I think guns are just as personal of a choice. My two cents.
     
  12. charliegirl

    charliegirl New Member

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    Also, if your wife plans on going to the range regularly and doesn't just break it out for those "just in case" moments, I wouldn't try to shoe horn her into a revolver - unless, of course, that's her preference. :) If she practices regularly (which, if you are going to own a gun, I believe that you should), there's no reason she can't become proficient with a semi-auto.
     
  13. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    Charliegirl has it right... both posts... I've been saying that for many, many years....
     
  14. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    my suggestion is let her try and see what fits her hand the best, be it semi auto or revolver. because it doesn't mater about the caliber if the gun doesn't fit her hand well. the fit in the hand has a lot to do with how well a person can control recoil.
     
  15. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    Keep in mind that the perceived recoil will have just as much to do with the form of the gun as its caliber. My wife does not care for my S&W BG 380 at all. It's very narrow, light with a short barrel. It kicks into the web of the hand very noticeably.

    Best advice is have her try multiple guns in different calibers and sizes.
     
  16. PanBaccha

    PanBaccha New Member

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    When I had purchased my Ruger LCP 380 I lessen the
    recoil effect somewhat by replacing recoil spring #9 lb
    with a #13 lb spring. Hardly any recoil whatsoever.
    :)
     

    Attached Files:

  17. jismail

    jismail Member

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    And if she doesn't?
     
  18. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    My daughter was somewhat reluctant, too.

    I made it a point to take her out to the range once.

    She at least has a familiarity with a rifle and pistol.
     
  19. jismail

    jismail Member

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    Most dedicated HD purchases are not made by "Gun Ensthusists"

    I am not saying it isn't a good idea to have a semi, All I am saying is that there is a good chance that the original 'getting familiar' effort that may be spent with the weapon may not be maintained thru continued practice, and if the weapon was purchased - as many are- by non-gun enthusists for that 'peace of mind' feeling of having a gun for HD in the house, it may even be stuck in a drawer 'just in case' and never handled regulary again.

    A weapon that you don't know how to use is of little use in times of an emergency, and sadly, while it is easy to say 'practice with it till your proficient', the likelyhood of that with the above mentioned catagory of gun owners is slim, and based on that assumption, a dedicated HD weapon should be selected by what will be most sucesfull by the least skilled user in the household in an emergency situation where stress, and andrenilin may overstep the original training with the weapon which may not yet be ingrained and second nature to the user.

    I personally would rather come home and find 6 holes in an intruder because she was able to point and pull sucessfully then to find her dead with a shiney pistol on the floor that she didn't remember how to shoot when the time was critical.
     
  20. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    One factor not mentioned is "Is she willing to use it?" If she does not have the mind set to shoot an intruder, the gun will be used against her. Most women will do anything to protect their children but not necessarily themselves. There is a lot more to home defense than having a weapon. There has to be a defense plan and a knowledge of where and when it is safe to shoot. Are there kids in the house? Where are the kids rooms? Do you have a plan to secure the kids? Do you have a plan to enter the house in a "situation"?
    My daughter had a prowler in the back yard. She called 911 and then called me as I lived 1 mile away. She secured the kids in the master bedroom on the floor behind the bed. The door was locked and she had a 9mm with 10 rnds and spare mags. She does know how to use it. I went to the house and identified myself. I asked if the kids were all right. She answered using the correct names for the kids. If she had answered yes or used the wrong names I would have known she was in trouble. I cleared the house. One police officer arrived 45 minutes later and rang the doorbell.