Hammer "Stub" Too Small

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by chuck_in_texas, Mar 28, 2010.

  1. chuck_in_texas

    chuck_in_texas New Member

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    My Taurus 851 snub is a nice little carry piece. I bought it (over the Mod 85) because of the shrouded hammer.

    However, the "stub" of the hammer that's supposed to permit SA cocking is really tiny. Touch of arthritis in my right hand, and to use it SA I have to reach over with my left thumb to cock it. Probably not the safest thing to do.

    Tried a buddy's S&W with shrouded hammer, and it's not easy but easier than the Taurus.

    Taurus CS says it's normal, and says I can send it in for a second opinion, but I'm not sure what that will do. I was thinking maybe of having a small spot weld or braze on top to give my thumb something to grip.

    Anybody else encountered this - - - - - as has a fix.

    BTW, the DA pull is fine, so I don't think the hammer is binding.
     
  2. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    Chuck, someone should be along shortly to give you some options. In the mean time, wuld you mind going over to the introductions thread and telling us a little about yourself?
     

  3. Dzscubie

    Dzscubie New Member

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    Chuch,

    As I see it the whole purpose of a shrouded hammer is to keep the hammer from being accidently being cocked back and placing the weapon in single action stage. I believe, not sure mind you, they were designed for concealed carry for police. If you want to cock your weapon and shoot single action why not just buy one with an exposed hammer? If you extend the hammer, and that's what I think you’re saying when you talk about putting “a small spot weld or braze on top” you are defeating the purpose of having a shrouded hammer. I would not do it myself.
     
  4. superc

    superc Member

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    I would give strong thought to obtaining a second hammer, then having that hammer built up via Tig welding to a shape you are comfortable with.

    Keep one hammer in original configuration just in case you someday want to go back to square one.

    The bottom gun pictured (Charter Arms Undevcover .38) now has a serrated top hammer shape that might be more to your liking. The original hammer, which now sits in drawer somewhere, wasn't too far away in shape from the top pistols. I have seen similar hammer mods done to S&W K and N frames also.
     

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    Last edited: Mar 28, 2010
  5. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    Buy a model 85 hammer and grind away the spur until you have just enough left to manually cock the revolver if you HAVE to shoot it single action. If it was ME I'd just practice double action only as that's the way the gun was designed to be fired anyway. The hammer was designed to not snag on clothing during the draw and any modifications to the hammer will affect that. I would recommend having a Wolff spring kit installed to safely, reliably reduce the trigger pull weight on DA.
     
  6. chuck_in_texas

    chuck_in_texas New Member

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    thanks to all for the quick answers! I mainly shoot the gun DA, and I bought the shrouded hammer since I pocket carry. (and pocket guns are DA, I know) the reason I had wanted the shrouded hammer, as opposed to a DA only (I also have a Ruger LCR that's DAO), was to have SA available as an option.

    What's troubling me, I suppose, is that the effort to get it cocked in SA is way more than I think it should be (at least way more than my old bones can handle).

    but it may be that all Taurus pieces with this config are like this.

    I guess my next step is to take it to a good smith and see what he says about whether or no anything is impeding. I DO like the idea of getting a second hammer before I try this, in case I want to go back to the original. Or, in case it had to go back for factory service.

    thanks again!!
     
  7. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    Another nice thing about the Wolff spring kits is they'll reduce cocking effort by 40%.
     
  8. chuck_in_texas

    chuck_in_texas New Member

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    stalkingbear:

    with the wolff springs, have you ever encountered a FTF? I've heard about them but been reluctant to try.

    I guess all I could do is to try a set and see if ignition is normal, eh?
     
  9. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    I've heard of people having trouble with Wolff springs but I've used them for a few weapons and not had the issue come up. I sometimes wonder if the ones with problems have not been installed properly but I have not actually held the "problem weapon(s)" so I can't make that assumption.
     
  10. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Well-Known Member

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    I've never experienced a failure to fire with the Wolff spring kits. I go with the middle weight mainspring when faced with a choice. If they weren't reliable I wouldn't recommend them.
     
  11. MoHawk

    MoHawk New Member

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    After reading this post, I ordered a Shooter's Pak for my Taurus 85 and a recoil spring pack for the S&W 908
     
  12. chuck_in_texas

    chuck_in_texas New Member

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    bear / drum:

    thanks - - - - - as I said, I don't know much about Wolff springs, so I'm glad to hear from some guys who have used them - - - - - - and more important: trust them.

    thanks again, guys
     
  13. superc

    superc Member

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    You can trust Wolff Springs. I have been using their products for decades. I use them in both revolvers and autos. If it is a coil spring for just about any firearm, they have it in stock. Likewise, if it is somehow a spring type they don't have, send them a good specimen and they will make one. For decades could mean I bought one 20 years ago, and it does, but it also means I have been using them fairly consistently and have bought products from them at least 4 times in the past month alone. Their products are good.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2010